GONE BY VALENTINES?

Now that the Oilers have a more tradition NHL GM, there are all kinds of possibilities that weren’t out there before. In-season trades to address current weakness (like a goalie or center last fall), minor league player for NHL player, that kind of thing. It also means we should be on the lookout for a pump and dump.

Arnason_ChuckThis is Chuck Arnason. Flin Flin Bomber. In junior hockey he was a tremendous scorer, popped 79 goals in his draft season and was chosen No. 7 overall in the 1971 draft. The problem? Montreal took him. At the 1971-72 training camp, Arnason’s competition on RW would have been:

  1. Yvan Cournoyer (who would score 47 goals on the top line in 1971-72)
  2. Guy Lafleur (No. 1 overall in 1971, and the next Beliveau)
  3. Rejean Houle (probably the most underrated Hab of the 70’s; it’s him or Pierre Mondou)
  4. Claude LaRose (a veteran two-way winger, scored 20 and played a rugged game)
  5. Phil Roberto (Two years older, wider range of skills than Arnason)

In other words, this was an insane depth chart and Arnason was going to have a difficult time making the grade. There IS a job there though, if you follow “Sam Pollock Logic” to its conclusion. Cournoyer was 27 that season and in Pollock land lots of forwards went missing after 30. Now Cournoyer was a freak (imagine Pavel Bure with a French name) of nature in terms of foot speed, but Pollock was always planning for a replacement and Arnason’s opportunity was right there (maybe No. 2 RW after Lafleur) but about three years away.

Arnason played 17 games in 1971 (three goals), added another 19 in 1972-73 and was off to Atlanta for a first-round pick in May 1973. He would score 20 goals a year for pretty much the rest of the decade and often on poor teams. In the fall of 1973, age 22, Arnason was out as a Montreal Canadien. That fall, Montreal’s RW depth chart (Cournoyer, Lafleur, LaRose) did have a 1971 draft pick in the group—but it was fleet Murray Wilson, who had grabbed employment from Arnason in 1972-73. Don’t feel bad Chuck Arnason, that was an impossible task in 1971-73.

nikitin capture 1Peter Chiarelli is going to move people. Signings and trades and releases and minor leagues and on it goes. If you think he’s finished, look again at what he did off-season and IN-SEASON during year one in Boston.

  • June 26, 2006: Bruins trade D Nick Boynton and a fourth-round pick to Phoenix for Paul Mara and a third-round pick. Gorton from the Bruins side: “The trade enabled us to get somebody who is more offensive and more capable on the power play. I think it will blend well with what we already have and we are looking forward to Paul coming here and wanting to be a part of the turnaround.” Source
  • July 1, 2006: Bruins sign D Zdeno Chara. A franchise altering transaction.
  • February 10, 2007: Bruins trade D Brad Stuart and F Wayne Primeau to the Calgary Flames for D Andrew Ference and F Chuck Kobasew. Chiarelli: “It became evident that when I wasn’t having success signing Brad that I was going to have to trade Brad. Part of what we have to do is preserve the assets of players that are unrestricted. Chuck is 24 and Andrew is 27. They add some youth and energy, which we want to add to this team.”
  • February 27, 2007: Bruins trade D Paul Mara to the NY Rangers for D Aaron Ward.
  • February 27, 2007: Bruins trade D Brad Boyes to St. Louis for D Dennis Wideman.
  • Chiarelli on the February trades: “Part of the rationale in the [Brad Stuart] deal and these two deals was to have players who can help us now, in the short term and the mid term. I feel we have the depth, both in unsigned draft choices and in Providence. For example, David Krejci came up, and game to game, he played better. So that’s just the glimpse of the depth we have.”

Bottom line? Yes they’ll probably look to deal Scrivens and Nikitin and Ference and Purcell during the season, but those are the easy ones—and all bets are off of the names who are performing well if Edmonton is in contention. It’s the second group—the Arnason group—I’m more interested in.

Peter Chiarelli’s name is on Cam Talbot, Andrej Sekera, Eric Gryba, Griffin Reinhart, Connor McDavid, Mark Letestu and Lauri Koprpikosi. He is unlikely to deal quality performers from the McDavid or Hall clusters but there’s a lot of talent outside those zones.

  • Nail Yakupov: In reality, he isn’t far from Arnason, save for the competition being less severe. If he can’t displace Purcell, what does that tell Peter Chiarelli? The weird thing is this: A pump and dump (lots of playing time on a feature line) and a genuine attempt to see the young man flourish (lots of playing time on a feature line) are identical. I honestly don’t believe he makes it. Seriously.
  • Justin Schultz: Last chance Texaco. He has substantial talent but it may not fit in Edmonton—this club’s overall weakness matches the player and that’s a bad, bad thing. McLellan has had success with young defensemen, and chances are Schultz’s TOI will be reduced in a big way—thus allowing him to slow the game down and build confidence and traction. I honestly don’t think he makes it. Seriously.
  • Anton Lander: I am so happy for him and hope he comes in and delivers across the board (he has a wide range of skills and can do some things offensively). There are dangers here—Letestu duplicates his skills and if anything has more gears—and the one coach who ever gave him some rope in the NHL is down the line. I honestly think he makes it and in a very big way as an Oilers player. Seriously.

They could be here for a decade or gone by Valentine’s. There’s a new man behind the big oak desk and he’s not attached to any of these kids beyond performance and winning. Life as the Oilers knew it is over. It’s a good thing, but there will be pain along the way.

 

written by

The author didn‘t add any Information to his profile yet.
Related Posts

57 Responses to "GONE BY VALENTINES?"

  1. oliveoilers says:

    Another 6th Grade reading level article from Specs.

    http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/nail-yakupov-is-the-lost-no-1-in-edmonton/

    Seriously, even with auto-editing, shouldn’t a professional journalist proof read their own stuff?

    Yool never katch me maiking such miss-steaks.

    Personally, I don’t think there is a difference between pump and dump and seeing what we’ve got. Oh wait, there is. One right offer before the trade deadline….

  2. Lowetide says:

    oliveoilers:
    Another 6th Grade reading level article from Specs.

    http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/nail-yakupov-is-the-lost-no-1-in-edmonton/

    Seriously, even with auto-editing, shouldn’t a professional journalist proof read their own stuff?

    Yool never katch me maiking such miss-steaks.

    Personally, I don’t think there is a difference between pump and dump and seeing what we’ve got.Oh wait, there is.One right offer before the trade deadline….

    I think trading Yakupov is lunacy but there are teams who have what Edmonton needs (top flight blue) and the Russian No. 1 is probably part of the package.

  3. oliveoilers says:

    Lowetide,

    Le sigh, I fear you are right.

    But I so don’t want it to be.

    Yakupov, I think, is the poster boy for the lunacy of the organisation in the B-Mc-D (Before McDavid). All the times we posted about the verbal not matching the actions.

    Oilers realised that highly skilled UFA’s did not want to come to Edmonton and that the draft is the way ahead; draft kids, get them to love being an Oiler and to never want to leave.

    Well, that’s Yakupov. Only, a strange thing happened on the way to the forum. We can only speculate. Was it Eakins? Was it subconscious racism (he a Russian, fer chrissakes!)? Was it playing with some honestly awful hockey players?

    The boy can play, and from Bob’s verbal the other day, I think Yak has a little grace time.

    Because you’re right LT, after this year, maybe sooner, we might have to replace Purcell AND Yak.

  4. Stud Muffin says:

    You say every season that you think Yak won’t make it. But he does.

  5. Centre of attention says:

    Lowetide, heres a ridiculous hypothetical situation, what do you think the odds are something like this happens?

    Yakupov starts in the top 6, lets say with 4/97. Lets say he shoots the lights out, hes shooting at like 20% and he has potted 15-20 goals by January.

    What do you think his trade value would be at that moment? What if St. Louis likes the idea of Yakupov/Tarasenko line? Would you do a Yak+ for Shattenkirk++? Throw Yakupov-Shutlz and lets say Brad Hunt for Shattenkirk, Some first/second round picks, and a prospect. [paajarvi? joking.]

    It would still be insane but I might be able to sleep at night if something like this happened.

    I still don’t like the idea of trading Yak, especially if he catches fire on the “Lottery Line”. Me thinks Chiarelli trades him simply to set a precedent, to put his stamp on the team so to speak.

    I think the odds are 2:1 that this sort of situation goes down, maybe its not Shattenkirk they target, but something tells me the Young Russian is showcased to 29 other teams this winter, and it is in the Oilers best interest that he performs, whether they want to trade him or not Yakupov has to do his part.

  6. Ducey says:

    Lowetide: I think trading Yakupov is lunacy but there are teams who have what Edmonton needs (top flight blue) and the Russian No. 1 is probably part of the package.

    But you said above you don’t think he will make it. Is that just as an Oiler? I understood you meant as an NHL player.

  7. Bar_Qu says:

    oliveoilers,

    It is the same thing with Yak as occurred with Petry. You develop a verbal/prejudice against a guy, then see the pieces of evidence that confirm it. With Petry, he didn’t play physical enough (not enough PIMs, right?). With Yak he’s poor defensively and not putting up the points (bad +/-, and look at those boxcars!).

    Eakins personified those things in the organization, which MacT perpetuated when Tambi left. There just didn’t seem to be a time when someone other than Kruger or Nelson went, “hmm, that isn’t working, let’t try this instead.”

    I am grossly oversimplifying, but when we see Yak traded, which I acknowledge seems very likely, we can look back and see the same actors from the last dumpster fire whispering their advice in the ear of the guy who makes the trade. At least Chia will make the trade dollar for dollar, rather than cents on the dollar.

  8. Lowetide says:

    Stud Muffin:
    You say every season that you think Yak won’t make it. But he does.

    Yak has NOT made it. Absolutely disagree with this.

  9. speeds says:

    Bar_Qu:
    oliveoilers,

    I am grossly oversimplifying, but when we see Yak traded, which I acknowledge seems very likely, we can look back and see the same actors from the last dumpster fire whispering their advice in the ear of the guy who makes the trade. At least Chia will make the trade dollar for dollar, rather than cents on the dollar.

    Do you feel like Marincin for a 4th was dollar for dollar?

  10. Lowetide says:

    Centre of attention:
    Lowetide, heres a ridiculous hypothetical situation, what do you think the odds are something like this happens?

    Yakupov starts in the top 6, lets say with 4/97. Lets say he shoots the lights out, hes shooting at like 20% and he has potted 15-20 goals by January.

    What do you think his trade value would be at that moment? What if St. Louis likes the idea of Yakupov/Tarasenko line? Would you do a Yak+ for Shattenkirk++? Throw Yakupov-Shutlz and lets say Brad Hunt for Shattenkirk, Some first/second round picks, and a prospect. [paajarvi? joking.]

    It would still be insane but I might be able to sleep at night if something like this happened.

    I still don’t like the idea of trading Yak, especially if he catches fire on the “Lottery Line”. Me thinks Chiarelli trades him simply to set a precedent, to put his stamp on the team so to speak.

    I think the odds are 2:1 that this sort of situation goes down, maybe its not Shattenkirk they target, but something tells me the Young Russian is showcased to 29 other teams this winter, and it is in the Oilers best interest that he performs, whether they want to trade him or not Yakupov has to do his part.

    If he has 15-20 goals by January, he’s here for this season and next, probably beyond.

  11. Магия 10 says:

    “If he can’t displace Purcell, what does that tell Peter Chiarelli?”

    Good point, but he will.

    “A pump and dump (lots of playing time on a feature line) and a genuine attempt to see the young man flourish (lots of playing time on a feature line) are identical.”

    The difference is that Purcell is traded at the deadline.

  12. Lowetide says:

    Ducey: But you said above you don’t think he will make it. Is that just as an Oiler? I understood you meant as an NHL player.

    I think Yakupov has tremendous ability but (as with Schultz) his weaknesses are a match for the Oilers. There’s not much doubt in my mind Yakupov can be a very good NHL player but he needs the right situation. I’m not sure EDM is that situation. Sorry should have been more clear.

  13. Marc says:

    Bar_Qu:
    oliveoilers,

    You develop a verbal/prejudice against a guy, then see the pieces of evidence that confirm it.

    This also describes the attitude of a sizeable portion of our community here towards Schultz.

  14. Snowman says:

    I think one thing that might save Yak is he’s a demon on the forecheck and Tmac’s teams forecheck hard.

  15. Centre of attention says:

    Ducey: But you said above you don’t think he will make it. Is that just as an Oiler? I understood you meant as an NHL player.

    LT definitely meant he wont make it as an Oiler. I think even if Yak performs, that is just increasing his trade value at this point. Imagine a cap-strapped team looking at a $2million dollar 1st over-all pick perform well, and possibly be available.

    How many phone calls do you think Chiarelli gets about Yakupov? Especially after the all-star break, when the Oilers other all-world talent will be showcased. Edmonton is seemingly overflowing with ridiculous talent, and there might almost be a bidding war on certain pieces. Especially if they are performing well.

    I really hope Chiarelli knocks it out of the park on the return, especially if Yakupov is performing well [re:coasting on a high shooting%]

    I’m sure there is a fair share of the fan base who will be absolutely enraged at the thought of trading YakCity, especially if he is filling the net.

    I’m undecided, it all depends on the return. If we get a “Seguin trade” level of return, I’ll be in the enraged camp, if we get a bonafied top 4 defenseman who isn’t 32+ years old as part of the package, I might be a bit more accepting.

    That being said, if Yakupov continues to struggle, and cannot secure the minutes to be really valuable by the deadline, I could see Chiarelli getting a less-then-desirable return for the player. Again, I would be in the enraged camp. But for different reasons.

  16. blainer says:

    Agree with you on three strides and then glide Yak.. although I think he is gone before Xmas. Have never seen much of a player there. Imagine if he actually could put his shots on net he might actually score a decent amount of goals. I also don’t think he meshes well with the other players well because he doesn’t know where to be at the NHL level. A player actually has to perform before there can be a pump and dump.

  17. flyfish1168 says:

    Its nice we all can feel free and share our opinion on this matter. I would love to keep both our top RW. ( and I don’t mean Purcell as one). Until it becomes a CAP issue, we can decide then. We maybe trading one of our top RW and then an injury hits then we are up $hit creek. Yak signed a very CAP friendly contract and genuinely wants to be here. Nail is the only physical, and gritty top 6 player we have along with his other tools. People should remember Yak was only -11 in the +/- ratio when he was being coached by Nelson and Kruger. G Money had an excellent article pertaining to what Yaks season was like when he was under a competent coach and a Center man. If we need to trade one i would trade Jordan more because he is not a very physical player or hard on the forecheck. Again good teams have two good players at each position and I prefer to keep both.

    If by all accounts pertaining to Klefbom, Nurse and Reinhart is true that they are tireless and can handle 24-27 minutes per game we don’t need another minute muncher top pairing.

    I have always been leary of strong teams trading good players to weaker teams, often it is the system that hides that players weakness and not the other way around.

    If and only if we really want another d-men then OEL is they only one I would go after. JMHO

  18. Stud Muffin says:

    Lowetide: Yak has NOT made it. Absolutely disagree with this.

    Yak has been in Edmonton 3 years and has been great away from that idiotic DallasEakins but you somehow will defend Eakins but not Yak. Yak had 20 points in the last 28 games if that’s not making it then I don’t what is.

  19. Centre of attention says:

    Snowman:
    I think one thing that might save Yak is he’s a demon on the forecheck and Tmac’s teams forecheck hard.

    I think if Yak plays on the 4/97 train, Hall will get in first on the forecheck down low, McDavid sets up to direct traffic in his office by the half-boards, and Yakupov spends most of his time drifting in the slot ready to use his shot.

    When Yak played with Roy, Roy liked to be in the slot some of the time, and Yak worked down low, scooting out occasionally to take a quick shot from point blank.

    Not so with Taylor/Connor, he will have to be out in the slot, if he gets down low it will be too crowded.

    I doubt Todd forces Hall to stay higher in the zone, why throw off your best players game?

    On the powerplay or at even strength, I would rather have Hall retrieve the puck down low and make the first pass to a waiting Yakupov, then the other way around.

  20. Really? says:

    Yakupov has not “made it”. As a matter of fact he is approaching abject failure.

    By eye, Yakupov lacks speed (he does have quickness), lacks the smarts, lacks the accuracy with his shot (he can fire the puck but is too often off the net), lacks top end moves (have never seen him beat/deke anyone).

    In short, what does Yakupov bring to the table????

  21. wheatnoil says:

    Stud Muffin: Yak has been in Edmonton 3 years and has been great away from that idiotic DallasEakins but you somehow will defend Eakins but not Yak. Yak had 20 points in the last 28 games if that’s not making it then I don’t what is.

    Almost half of those points (9 of the 20) were on the Powerplay. His even-strength play wasn’t as good, but it actually wasn’t bad either, with a 1.68 P/60 in those last 28 games. His corsi wasn’t great, but neither was the team’s. Corsi-rel was negative, but near even.

    28 games over the whole season is a small sample size. That said, if Yakupov can produce like that over a whole year (near break-even possession relative to team, 2nd-3rd line production at evens, PP killer) there will be a role for him going forward.

    I’m not sure it’s enough to make him a core piece. He turns 22 very early this coming season. Peak offensive production for forwards is between 23 and 26 years old (though they don’t decline sharply until their 30s, I believe), so we’ll have Yakupov surrounded offensively pretty soon.

  22. Centre of attention says:

    Lowetide: If he has 15-20 goals by January, he’s here for this season and next, probably beyond.

    I was exaggerating more then a bit with “15-20 goals” But really. if its just a high shooting%, do you think its repeatable? What are the odds he cools off dramatically? I’m torn as well. If he performs that well, we will have to give him a significant raise, and McDavids contract will be the year after. This is a factor as well.

    What about Eberle? His contract year comes in sync with McDavids doesn’t it? Do you think Yak shooting at 17-20% could push Eberle out of the picture long term? Who is a more consistent player?

    Thinking ahead 2 years is what leads me to believe there will be a trade. It will be one of those 2 players, and I don’t like the thought of trading either. Why can’t we have ALL the good players, forever 🙁 The Canadian dollar will make sure the cap is not the Oilers friend and I don’t like it one bit.

  23. Bar_Qu says:

    speeds: Do you feel like Marincin for a 4th was dollar for dollar?

    Good point.

    Now I’m more sad.

  24. Rip Fan Winkle says:

    With a team like this and all the brass with teeth new, it is not easy to see the near future. I agree the team will be remade to Pete’s taste, for certain.

    Players like Yak and Schultz who are so one dimensional (and Yak’s position can allow for it more) yet still don’t score enough to warrant the weak overall play are vulnerable to a GM like Chiarelli. Any sane GM really.

    Hockey Canada has regularly chosen rep and size over speed and ability for the WJHC and who knows what role Nicholson had in that.

    Lander on the other hand is a quality 5 tool bottom six player, and he signed for cheap. Chiarelli knows this type of player and if Lander values NHL play over maximum contracts he could have a long Oiler/NHL career. He can skate, he’s an agitator to a degree, he’s physical, he can play with skill, he has international rep, he’s a centre, he becomes captain often.

    Those are the type of players that contenders are built on and Pete has had them, and overpaid them to his cap detriment.

    My take is he could be seen as a keeper if money is less an issue for him. Capped leagues are always tight financially for teams, but unless there is a fairly quick turnaround in the CAN $ purse strings will be more tight than normal. Cheap, good and a team guy is hard to give up.

  25. Bar_Qu says:

    Marc: This also describes the attitude of a sizeable portion of our community here towards Schultz.

    Which is the best part of the discussions in these threads. If the sizeable portion of the community is wrong, then the evidence in the numbers or on ice results will prove them wrong.

    I remember arguing with FSB(P?) about the value of Pacioretty versus Hemsky a few years back. He was very clear this was a special player and I didn’t agree. I was delighted when it was proved over the past number of years that Pacioretty was special (and I was wrong).

    Numbers and results win the argument. Not the majority.

  26. Ryan says:

    Over at the fine blog, Fear the Fin, early reaction regarding the Mclellan signing from their comment posters was that Yak really isn’t Mclellan’s type of player.

    To be fair, you can’t really call any player with back-to-back sub -30 seasons a coach’s player type… Yet they’re anticipating significant friction between Yak and Mclellan.

    Someone read my mind and beat me to the punch in the Vandevelde thread here… Yak’s last season here was basically VV+ a minute and 49 of pp toi/60. It’s going to be an uphill battle for Yak this season.

    Of the trio, I’ve already predicted that Lander’s days as an Oiler will be numbered. I realize that it’s both an unpopular as well as minority opinion here.

    While GMoney called it confirmation bias… It was actually quite the opposite. To me the underlying numbers go against the narrative we’ve created for Lander. I don’t see enough sustainable offense going forward. I also don’t see enough in the underlying numbers to support his “two-way” reputation.

  27. Centre of attention says:

    Everyone has to remember, Chiarelli traded a young 20-something PROVEN 30+ goal scorer in Phil Kessel for a return that didn’t improve his team immediately. He ended up winning that trade eventually, but for a time it was uncertain.

    He flat out stated he’s not afraid to trade good young forwards in one of his first pressers in Edmonton, it all depends on the return.

    I will still be heart broken if Yak gets traded, but the reasonable bet is that he does.

  28. jonrmcleod says:

    Stud Muffin,

    A lot of people complain about Eakins, but maybe if he’d been given Franson instead of Nikitin, things would be different. 😉

  29. wheatnoil says:

    Ryan,

    McLellan plays a pretty aggressive forecheck off the dump in, if I’m not mistaken. I’ve noticed that when Yak is on his game, he really steps up his forecheck, getting in the zone fast and using his body. If he can keep his game simple, forecheck hard, force the turnover and get open for a shot, that’ll be his meal ticket with McLellan.

    Whether he succeeds with that… we’ll see I guess. That’s up to McLellan to communicate / motivate and Yak to follow through.

  30. Yeti says:

    Stud MuffinYak had 20 points in the last 28 games if that’s not making it then I don’t what is.

    Doing it for a full season?

  31. Pouzar says:

    Lowetide: I think trading Yakupov is lunacy but there are teams who have what Edmonton needs (top flight blue) and the Russian No. 1 is probably part of the package.

    I think trading Eberle is lunacy but I bet it happens on Chia’s watch.

  32. JD¡™ David O'Connor's Reel says:

    Oh come on LT – that desk has got to be walnut or better.

    Where’s Woodguy?

  33. godot10 says:

    Yakupov is too slow to be the guy in on the forecheck with Hall and McDavid. The guy playing with Hall and McDavid has to be exceptional on the back check, and recognizing which player to pick up on the back check.

    And neither Yakupov, nor Eberle is that guy.

    My kingdom for a reincarnation of Tikkanen. (Or a right shot version of Pouliot.)

    Of the Oilers centres, Lander has the best skill set to complement Yakupov. Yakupov is an alpha dog. He needs his own line. One finds players to play with him, and not try to make him fit into other lines.

    It is better for Yakupov to be the feature player on the third scoring line than a complementary player on the other two lines.

    But he should be on the powerplay with the other feature players.

  34. Doug McLachlan says:

    Yak is on a good bridge deal for this year and the next.

    He gets a chance to show if he clicks with McJesus. We all know how this plays out if Yak can’t get the cannon unleashed but I choose to anticipate success.

    Oh and the Hall-McDavid-Yakupov line has to be either the Lotto-Max line or (for American fans) the PowerBall line. Right?

  35. RexLibris says:

    JD¡™ David O’Connor’s Reel:
    Oh come on LT – that desk has got to be walnut or better.

    Where’s Woodguy?

    Yeah, but oak is very 80s.

    Dynasty days and all that. If the organization hates changing people what must they feel about the furniture?

  36. Pouzar says:

    Stud Muffin: Yak has been in Edmonton 3 years and has been great away from that idiotic DallasEakins but you somehow will defend Eakins but not Yak. Yak had 20 points in the last 28 games if that’s not making it then I don’t what is.

    Yeah the list of Yak defenders is real short in Oilerville.

  37. Pouzar says:

    Centre of attention: Who is a more consistent player?

    Honest to Gord….I just want to **** puppies.

  38. Stelio Kontos (Formerly Zangetsu-Formerly Thinker) says:

    Check this out. Golden Bears Football put out their own version of Oil Change. Pretty neat stuff.
    https://twitter.com/BearsandPandas/status/637002431356907520

  39. JD¡™ David O'Connor's Reel says:

    x

    RexLibris: Yeah, but oak is very 80s.

    I doubt it survived the Eakins era:

    Chop wood. Carrie Fisher.

  40. Woogie63 says:

    godot10,

    I feel our entire RW fits this comment, Eberle, Yakupov and Purcell all want to be going north

  41. SwedishPoster says:

    I think Yak is bound to be top 3 on the team in goals scored this season. If he can at least back check hard and play physical when on D I think he’s a very useful player. I also think there’s a decent chance he explodes as a goalscorer within his two year contract. I absolutely disagree with those of you who claim Yak lacks a high end skillset.The guy is 21, soon 22. As been mentioned players usually peak offensively between 23-26, which also means some players Peak at 26, we are way too quick to give up on players who joins the league at 18. Doubt the Canucks would have been happy flushing the Sedins at 22.

  42. book¡je says:

    Seriously?

  43. Oilanderp says:

    Nail Yakupov: In reality, he isn’t far from Arnason, save for the competition being less severe. If he can’t displace Purcell, what does that tell Peter Chiarelli? The weird thing is this: A pump and dump (lots of playing time on a feature line) and a genuine attempt to see the young man flourish (lots of playing time on a feature line) are identical. I honestly don’t believe he makes it. Seriously.

    GUARDS! SEIZE THAT MAN! ….

    GUARDS!

    Crap, this isn’t my caaaaaastlllllllllle!

    *jumps over the wall into the ferocious corgi infested briar patch below*

  44. SwedishPoster says:

    In other news Anders Nilsson has arrived in Edmonton three weeks before camp. He did an interview with swedish media on his way over, while waiting on a connecting flight on Iceland(icelandic people are the coolest people on earth, Björk is pretty much the least cool person from Iceland, which is saying something because she’s awesome).

    I won’t do a complete transcription but will add the yest of it. First they chatted a bit about being a new dad, his son was born seven weeks ago, he’s left the newborn and his wife in Sweden for now, they’re coming over later.

    He started by saying he’s happy to get the opportunity, he feels management believes in him and while he understands he’s coming into camp as the third string and that it’s going to be a tough task he feels it’s up to him to prove he’s worth a shot and that he’s getting a more fair chance than wtih the Islanders since this time he’s on a oneway contract. He says it’s up to him, if he’s sent down it’s on him, noone else to blame.

    When asked if he’s afraid to end up in the AHL: “I wouldn’t say I’m afraid. I haven’t even thought about it. I’m not going there to play the AHL, I’m completely focused on establishing myself in the NHL. I’ll take it as it comes, but I guess you can say I don’t think I would develop a lot more from playing in the AHL. I’ve already done that for three seasons.”

    He then said he had offers from his former SHL club Luleå but that he was clear that he wanted to give the NHL another shot. He felt it was too early to come home and didn’t want to look back on his career and regret not taking the chance.

    He was happy that it was Edmonton that gave him the call with all the things that’s happened there this summer, “with McDavid and everything”, he feels it’s a club with a great future and he’s happy tagging along on this journey with so much talent on the club.

    The reason he’s coming so early is so that he can get used to the smaller rink, acclimatize to a new enviroment, meeting his new coaches, the goalie coach et al.
    He also wants “to show them this is where he wants to be”. It wasn’t mandatory to be there until the day before camp(17th Sep) but he wanted to make a statement that he’s here to battle and have everything in place when camp starts so he can focus completely on hockey once camp starts.

    A couple of personal comments. I’m not sure how it comes off in translation but my interpretation of his AHL comments are that he certainly won’t stay past this season if he’s stuck in the AHL but if he gets sent down he’ll buckle down to make sure he makes it back up, ergo he won’t bail if he starts in the minors. At least that’s how I read it, he wants to give this a proper go.

    I also get the feeling that this a man on a mission. He has come to Edmonton to play. I mean the man leaves his wife and seven weeks old son in Sweden to fly in three weeks early to get his head in the game.

    Scrivens better bring his A game because Nilsson is here to battle.

  45. Snowman says:

    Centre of attention,

    Macellan uses a two man forecheck so it’ll be Hall and Yak not Hall or Yak.

  46. SwedishPoster says:

    book¡je:
    Seriously?

    Yes.

  47. wheatnoil says:

    SwedishPoster,

    Thanks for the info!

    Even if he doesn’t beat out Scrivens, if he goes down and blows the cover off the AHL, Chia might be able to flip him for a mid-to-late draft pick to a team with a goalie injury. That’s not a bad return on Liam Coughlin.

  48. Centre of attention says:

    Snowman:
    Centre of attention,

    Macellan uses a two man forecheck so it’ll be Hall and Yak not Hall or Yak.

    I think it will be Hall/McDavid in on the forecheck and Yak being the trigger man out in the slot. That was my point. I understand its a 2 man forecheck but looking how the players work on the ice, I think 4/97 get first pick of positioning. Yak just has to get open, and jamming on the boards means he isn’t open.

  49. flyfish1168 says:

    Yak has really been in the league 2.5 years and 1.5 years was wasted by an incompetent wannabe NHL coach. Opps i forgot they don’t understand simple defense, famous last words.

  50. Frank the dog says:

    I think Yak’s performance during his short time under Lander is more indicative of where he can go than all the time spent under Eakins
    Yak was improving with Roy, may do well with Lander or the more experienced Drai or big Yak. May explode with Connor though, with Connor and Taylor drawing the D. He does bring physicality, sandpaper, a good attitude towards being coached, and a great one timer that could be perfect for the Hall-McDavid line.
    Unfortunately though his improvement even under TMac may be too little, too late. We’ll see.

  51. Rebilled says:

    SwedishPoster,

    Unless the Professor has learned how not to slide way out of his net, Anders should have a good chance.

  52. Snowman says:

    Centre of attention: I think it will be Hall/McDavid in on the forecheck and Yak being the trigger man out in the slot. That was my point. I understand its a 2 man forecheck but looking how the players work on the ice, I think 4/97 get first pick of positioning. Yak just has to get open, and jamming on the boards means he isn’t open.

    If I have a winger who is very durable and mean who plays poorly positionally and a generational, skilled high IQ center, who am I sending into the corners against the worlds biggest toughest Dmen? Not the center.

    I’d much rather have Mcdavid out in the open ice using his high hockey IQ to read the play and get in the right position than Yak out in the open ice and floating around aimlessly while Mcdavid takes a beating.

    Edit: It makes zero sense to prioritize Yak not “jamming on the boards”. The less time Mcdavid spends jamming on the boards the more time he is using his skill to destroy the league.

  53. Snowman says:

    I feel like we had this discussion last year but people need to realize that Yak might not ever live up to his # 1 overall status. He may in fact become a 2-3 line tweener who can help you on the powerplay that scores 20-25 goals.

    He has a tonne of skill but he goes walkabout during the game more often than not. Some of that is on the Oilers but some of that is on the player. This is an important year Yak. He’s got to learn to play a sound game positionally if he wants to be a regular in the top 6. The NHL is too good of a league to have a player on a feature line who can’t be relied upon to be where he needs to be in either end of the ice.

    I love Yak. I love his enthusiasm for the game and his work ethic and all that other stuff that makes him a favorite. That stuff doesn’t help him not get murdered in a top 6 role though.

  54. Hammers says:

    Funny thing is the 3 your not sure of in Yak ,Lander and Schultz are the 3 I feel will have more points than you gave them . Hope I’m right and your not LT .

  55. Marc says:

    Lowetide: I think Yakupov has tremendous ability but (as with Schultz) his weaknesses are a match for the Oilers. There’s not much doubt in my mind Yakupov can be a very good NHL player but he needs the right situation. I’m not sure EDM is that situation. Sorry should have been more clear.

    This might be true this coming season, but you don’t have to look very far in the future to see a time when it isn’t.

    The Oilers have three young centres who project to be above average to elite defensively, and who project to be above average to elite playmakers. What type of winger will be most successful with players of that description – a player with elite offensive skills who is shaky going the other way, or a solid third liner who lacks high end skill?

    I’d say the former. A good two way centre can cover most of Yak’s defensive lapses. Lumbering an elite playmaker with a winger that can’t take advantage of the space created by guys like McDavid and Nuge, or bury the passes they get from them though, that actually compromises the effectiveness of the best players on the team.

    Add to that the fact that RW is by far the weakest position in the Oilers’s system – after Eberle and Yak there are a bunch of guys that will be beating the odds if they make the NHL in any capacity. Depending on these guys to be an effective top six winger is somewhere between optimistic and delusional. It’s certainly not something a smart organisation should be staking McDavid’s ELC and RFA years on.

    I think it’s more accurate to say that Yak’s strengths are exactly what the Oilers need going forward, and his weaknesses can be easily covered by the Oilers, if not now, then soon.

    The same is true of Schultz. You just did a post about the fact that the Oilers two high end D prospects project to be better defensively than offensively. The same is true of Klef. Schultz (as Bruce so eloquently pointed out a couple of days ago) is not only the only D on the team with high end offensive skills, he is miles and miles better than anyone else.

    And scoring D happens to be another organisational weakness. Hunt and LaLeggia are pretty much it. And even if they make the show, it is again somewhere between optimistic and delusional to expect them to be even as good as Schultz defensively, given how small they are.

    Again Schultz’s strengths are exactly what the Oilers need going forward, and his weaknesses can be easily covered by one or more of the Oilers’ three young defensive D, if not now, then soon.

  56. Bootstrap Effexor says:

    oliveoilers:
    Seriously, even with auto-editing, shouldn’t a professional journalist proof read their own stuff?

    At the level of grammar and spelling, the copy as it now stands is clean so far as I can see. It’s even using official Canadian ervresal of centre-* that I can’t be bothered with.

    I wondered about the the correct hyphenation of “third most” in the opening phrase in the second paragraph for a moment.

    While Taylor Hall has emerged as the third most productive left-winger in the NHL over the past three seasons

    But, no, it turns out that most editors avoid hyphenating superlatives in compound modifiers.

    He is, however, guilty of a few clunky sentences:

    There is still an obvious reserve of talent here (and quite a nice young man, we might add), but thus far only Nelson has approached success in mining that lode — without the puck ending up in the wrong net more often than not.

    Clunkier than Granny Clampett cutting a tabletop chicken-dance rug in ill-fitting souvenir clogs at her first-ever Nederland Bierfestival.

    “This stuff is thinner than possum piss!” she grouses as she hooks four more pints for the Clampett clan (excepting Jethro, whom they have shipped off for the day to the Sprookjeswonderland theme park).

    “And that ain’t no way to chicken dance!” as she kicks up onto the table in her unsteady clogs to demonstrate to the feather-brained furriners her bush chicka chicka boom boom.

  57. oliveoilers says:

    Bootstrap Effexor,

    Lifted ad verbatim from The Spec’s great article:

    “When he arrived in the NHL, Yakupov’s centreman complained they had no clue where he would end up at any given moment, and his defensive game was horrendous.”

    CentreMAN and ‘they’? It’s men’s hockey and he had more than one centreman.

    There are a few more. Childish, I know. But it’s been annoying me for a while. Just don’t get me started on the BBC. They used to be the watch word for grammatical correctness. When even I start noticing, there’s a problem. Also, the newsreaders who can’t read on CBC radio.

    And I’m aware that my prose is full of holes, but then, I don’t get paid to purvey the English language to the masses.

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!
© Copyright - Lowetide.ca