OILERS SIGN DAVID MUSIL

David Musil signed today with the Edmonton Oilers, it is the kind of contract given out annually to a player who is in the mix for 7D on the NHL depth chart ($600k, per Bob Stauffer). That contract may be the last one he signs with the team. Musil will be waiver eligible this fall and the team will have a choice to make: Risk losing him or keeping him on the roster as a 7D or 8D. This is exactly what happened last fall with Brandon Davidson.

In an era where speed is king, David Musil is bucking the trend. Make no mistake about his potential, we’re talking about a player who—if everything breaks right—will play in the NHL as a pure defender and PK man. That’s a third pairing defender, along the lines of Ladislav Smid or Eric Gryba.

Peter Chiarelli and Todd McLellan did not bring him to the show during a season when blue were dropping like flies—and yet they qualified him. As is the case with Tyler Pitlick, Edmonton had a chance to walk him and chose not to do it. That tells me the club still believes in him on some level, hockey men have liked his defense from the start.

  • Red Line Report (ranked him No. 17 in 2011)Maintains great gap control and always squares up to the puckhandler. Has good poise, plays solid, mistake-free game in own zone and is excellent positionally. Reads and anticipates developing plays well. Good laterally, but 1st step and straightaway speed are average. Is not good as either a PP quarterback or trigger-man— has weak shot and makes poor decisions in puck distribution.

I always like to go all the way back to draft day scouting reports, it is extremely uncommon for players to shed those words. Musil has been in the minors for all but four games—and speed, plus the Leftorium, are the reasons why. I imagine the player and agent agitated for a one-way deal, but as it is this young man will have lots of competition for that job—in fact, Jordan Oesterle might have the inside track.

EVEN STRENGTH GF-GA (2014-15)

  1. Oscar Klefbom (17-7) +10
  2. Brandon Davidson (42-32) +10
  3. Dillon Simpson (48-44) +4
  4. David Musil (40-38) +2
  5. Martin Gernat (37-37) 0
  6. Brad Hunt (52-53) -1
  7. Martin Marincin (16-21) -5
  8. C.J. Ludwig (13-20) -7
  9. Jordan Oesterle (39-47) -8

This is even-strength goals for-against while each player is on the ice. We don’t have time on ice, qual comp, qual team or possession, but this does indicate that good things were happening with Klefbom and Davidson on the ice—both men moving up to the NHL in the following season. Source: Eric Rodgers.

EVEN STRENGTH GF-GA (2015-16)

  1. Brad Hunt (57-50) +7
  2. Joey Laleggia (54-50) +4
  3. Dillon Simpson (43-39) +4
  4. Darnell Nurse (6-4) +2
  5. Colton Waltz (2-1) +1
  6. Mark Fayne (2-2) 0
  7. Martin Gernat (15-16) -1
  8. Griffin Reinhart (22-24) -2
  9. Caleb Jones (1-3) -2
  10. Ben Bekter (6-9) -3
  11. David Musil (46-50) -4
  12. Jordan Oesterle (36-41) -5
  13. Nick Pageau (8-14) -6
  14. Nikita Nikitin (12-24) -12
  15. Source Eric Rodgers

OILERS CURRENT 50-MAN LIST

50-man

List is now complete, David Musil being the last RFA. Edmonton may still find time to add one of their own free agents (major or minor) and the team does have room (three slide rules, two of which are likely to do just that thing).

STRAGGLERS

  1. L Kale Kessy. Not qualified, destination unknown.
  2. D Adam Pardy. UFA, destination unknown.
  3. D Eric Gryba, UFA, destination unknown.
  4. D Nikita Nikitin, UFA, rumored to be heading to Omsk (KHL).
  5. C Marco Roy. minor league UFA, destination unknown.

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45 Responses to "OILERS SIGN DAVID MUSIL"

  1. Ducey says:

    Anyone know what happens to Big Yak’s contract when he goes to the KHL?

    He is in the last year of his ELC. Does it get used up, or does it apply next year should he return to North America?

    Also Martin the Martian signed today with the Leaves 2 x $1.25 M.

  2. Lowetide says:

    Ducey:
    Anyone know what happens to Big Yak’s contract when he goes to the KHL?

    He is in the last year of his ELC. Does it get used up, or does it apply next year should he return to North America?

    Also Martin the Martian signed today with the Leaves 2 x $1.25 M.

    Yakimov stays on the 50-man, his entry-level deal will expire at the end of 2016-17. The Oilers basically let the clock run out, do not qualify and poof! He is gone.

  3. Ducey says:

    Lowetide: Yakimov stays on the 50-man, his entry-level deal will expire at the end of 2016-17. The Oilers basically let the clock run out, do not qualify and poof! He is gone.

    They could also qualify him, too, right?

  4. Lowetide says:

    Ducey: They could also qualify him, too, right?

    Sure. He COULD be in Bakersfield in November.

  5. godot10 says:

    //Peter Chiarelli and Todd McLellan did not bring him to the show during a season when blue were dropping like flies—and yet they qualified him.//

    A team only has 4 recalls after the trade deadline. The Oilers used them on Nurse, Osterle, Khaira, and Broissoit. Pardy and Clendenning were brought in as extra bodies off waivers to just run out the season.

    The Oilers also wanted Bakersfield to make the playoffs. And David Musil was the key to holding the Bakersfield defense together on the defensive side of the game.

    Simpson and Musil were victims of circumstance in their not getting a callup.

  6. Lowetide says:

    godot10:
    //Peter Chiarelli and Todd McLellan did not bring him to the show during a season when blue were dropping like flies—and yet they qualified him.//

    A team only has 4 recalls after the trade deadline.The Oilers used them on Nurse, Osterle, Khaira, and Broissoit. Pardy and Clendenning were brought in as extra bodies off waivers to just run out the season.

    The Oilers also wanted Bakersfield to make the playoffs.And David Musil was the key to holding the Bakersfield defense together on the defensive side of the game.

    Simpson and Musil were victims of circumstance in their not getting a callup.

    Musil was an option, they passed on him. We can argue the importance of that fact, but the presence of Nurse and Oesterle in the recall group suggests a decision was in fact made (he was lower on the depth chart) on Musil at that time.

  7. LMHF#1 says:

    Would rather they have given that money and spot to someone who might be struggling but with a higher ceiling than Musil.

  8. Lowetide says:

    LMHF#1:
    Would rather they have given that money and spot to someone who might be struggling but with a higher ceiling than Musil.

    I won’t argue ceiling, because Musil (should he be a 5-6) would have value. The Oilers have so many lefties—and so many players like Musil but better—it really is a rather superfluous signing.

  9. Mr DeBakey says:

    LMHF#1:
    Would rather they have given that money and spot to someone who might be struggling but with a higher ceiling than Musil.

    An NHL team always needs lots of D; the real headscratcher remains Sallinen.

  10. Lowetide says:

    Mr DeBakey: An NHL team always needs lots of D; the real headscratcher remains Sallinen.

    Good God man, they couldn’t sign Petrell and had just bought out Korpikoski!

  11. Centre of attention says:

    Not exactly Oilers related, but some interesting conversation from the twitterverse I would like to bring here:

    Adam Herman
    ‏@AdamZHerman
    So this book made me question: What are some radical hockey strategies you think might work but that coaches would never try?

    Matt Pfeffer
    ‏@MattPfefferHky Matt Pfeffer Retweeted Adam Herman
    Forward who stays at opposition blue line. Think of it like a 5v4 but every time you clear puck you get a breakaway

    Heh. I mean, isn’t that what the Leafs tried doing with Kessel, but everyone blamed Kessel instead of the system? I think Jack Adams down in Calgary there tried it for awhile too, the whole “give up more chances in your own zone just to get more break aways” kind of deal.

    I mean the 80’s Oilers kind of did the same thing too right? Gretz just kind of hung around center ice waiting for his line mates to snag the puck in the D-zone and feed him for a breakaway or two-on-one?

    What are some crazy ideas you guys would try but an NHL coach never would? 4 or 5 forwards at even strength?

  12. Chachi says:

    Centre of attention,

    “I mean the 80’s Oilers kind of did the same thing too right? Gretz just kind of hung around center ice waiting for his line mates to snag the puck in the D-zone and feed him for a breakaway or two-on-one?”

    I can’t tell if this is meant be a joke or if you are serious. If it is a joke, lol, if not the answer is no.

  13. Chachi says:

    Centre of attention,

    As far as crazy ideas go, a 600 pound goalie would be worth exploring.

  14. Ryan says:

    LMHF#1:
    Would rather they have given that money and spot to someone who might be struggling but with a higher ceiling than Musil.

    The Oilers have a long and irrational fear of losing marginal prospects to waivers.

    When Peter Hollands and Jacob Kindls sail thru waivers all day long…

    They also have a long history of loss aversion for marginal prospects that they spent high draft picks on.

    If everything breaks right, he’s a player that no team really covets like a Gryba. That’s faint praise.

  15. Centre of attention says:

    Chachi:
    Centre of attention,

    As far as crazy ideas go, a 600 pound goalie would be worth exploring.

    Haha. It’s all fun and games until you want to pull the goalie in the last few minutes and he can’t make it to the bench in time for the extra attacker LOL. That would be entertaining, for sure. I think you may have to redesign the benches as well :p

    Ryan: The Oilers have a long and irrational fear of losing marginal prospects to waivers.

    When Peter Hollands and Jacob Kindls sail thru waivers all day long…

    They also have a long history of loss aversion for marginal prospects that they spent high draft picks on.

    If everything breaks right, he’s a player that no team really covets like a Gryba.That’s faint praise.

    The Ottawa Senators once put 30 goal guy Hoffman on waivers. Not even kidding. Can’t believe he cleared.

  16. Centre of attention says:

    Chachi:
    Centre of attention,

    “I mean the 80’s Oilers kind of did the same thing too right? Gretz just kind of hung around center ice waiting for his line mates to snag the puck in the D-zone and feed him for a breakaway or two-on-one?”

    I can’t tell if this is meant be a joke or if you are serious. If it is a joke, lol, if not the answer is no.

    No, no. Clearly Gretzky was incredibly diligent in his own zone and never ever cheated for offense. Not once 😉

    (I’m joking now, just in case you can’t figure it out)

  17. Woodguy says:

    Chachi:
    Centre of attention,

    “I mean the 80’s Oilers kind of did the same thing too right? Gretz just kind of hung around center ice waiting for his line mates to snag the puck in the D-zone and feed him for a breakaway or two-on-one?”

    I can’t tell if this is meant be a joke or if you are serious. If it is a joke, lol, if not the answer is no.

    That’s almost exactly how Gretzky played.

    Kurri went and did the hard work and Gretz was near or past the blue line.

    He got many break aways because he started behind the Dmen, not due to his speed.

  18. Jethro Tull says:

    Ryan: When Peter Hollands and Jacob Kindls sail thru waivers all day long…

    It’s tough to get a good read on Kindl…….

  19. Centre of attention says:

    Jethro Tull: It’s tough to get a good read on Kindl…….

    Go home Gene, you’re drunk. Lol.

    Seriously though you’re on point with some of these gags, haha!

  20. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Woodguy: That’s almost exactly how Gretzky played.

    Kurri went and did the hard work and Gretz was near or past the blue line.

    He got many break aways because he started behind the Dmen, not due to his speed.

    Gretzky was a Datsyukian-class puck thief. Mind you he would often come from the blind side (ie behind the play). He caused a shitton of turnovers with that magic wand of his.

    The idea that he did nothing on the defensive side of the puck is far from the entire truth. That said, he was beyond comparison in his ability to read a transition and to jump into the opening, which some saw as goal-sucking, others as a proper use of skill. Depended who one was rooting for more than anything.

    I would also dispute his “not a fast skater” reputation. If you lined up all the Oilers speedsters for a race, if it was end to end Coffey would win it, if it was offensive blueline to goal line Anderson would win it, but if it was a race to the puck, I’d put my money on #99. Had the best first step I have ever seen, & it’s not particularly close.

  21. AsiaOil says:

    Gretz was an all-time great – but here are his boxcars from 93-94 in LA just before the wheels fell off:

    81GP 38-92-130 -25

    Boggles the mind how you score 130 points and end up -25. He must have needed a hall pass to go past the blue line his own end that year.

  22. Centre of attention says:

    Bruce McCurdy: Gretzky was a Datsyukian-class puck thief.Mind you he would often come from the blind side (ie behind the play). He caused a shitton of turnovers with that magic wand of his.

    The idea that he did nothing on the defensive side of the puck is far from the entire truth. That said, he was beyond comparison in his ability to read a transition and to jump into the opening, which some saw as goal-sucking, others as a proper use of skill. Depended who one was rooting for more than anything.

    I would also dispute his “not a fast skater” reputation. If you lined up all the Oilers speedsters for a race, if it was end to end Coffey would win it, if it was offensive blueline to goal line Anderson would win it, but if it was a race to the puck, I’d put my money on #99. Had the best first step I have ever seen, & it’s not particularly close.

    I know he came back and stole pucks, I was just saying his focus on offense was so successful that he never really “needed” to come back deep in his own zone.

    Like you say, he could just dart in from his own blue line and steal the puck off the opposing point mans stick and just like that he was away and gone.

    Also, I agree with your analysis of Gretz being the first one to a loose puck. I think the way he could pick his angle and direction gave him an advantage as well as his first step.

    For example, off a dump in a defender will chase the puck into his own zone. Gretzky would go to where the puck will eventually end up, seemingly out skating the D there but in reality he just picked the perfect angle.

  23. Centre of attention says:

    AsiaOil:
    Gretz was an all-time great – but here are his boxcars from 93-94 in LA just before the wheels fell off:

    81GP38-92-130-25

    Boggles the mind how you score 130 points and end up -25. He must have needed a hall pass to go past the blue line his own end that year.

    The 93-94 Kings were a bad team. Gretzky was not the reason for this.

  24. Jaxon says:

    Centre of attention,

    One thing that I think is crazy that coaches don’t often try is when they have a face off in the offensive zone with less than 4 or 5 seconds left and they don’t pull their goalie. Why the hell not?!? The odds of the opposition team getting possession AND firing it down the ice AND hitting the night in less than 5 seconds is miniscule. But having an (6 on 5) extra man in the attacking zone for a final ‘go-for-it’ faceoff must increase your chances of scoring. Every time there is an opportunity and I get hopeful, they don’t go for it, it makes me a bit angry. I know, I need to get a life if that is what keeps me up at night, but damn it, I don’t understand why it doesn’t happen more often or even rarely. Plus, it would be exciting for the fans and the team. Probably good for team morale too. I would be pumped if my coach was telling us to gamble and go for it in that situation. I’d be like, “Right on, let’s do this!”

  25. Gordies Elbow says:

    Ryan: The Oilers have a long and irrational fear of losing marginal prospects to waivers.

    When Peter Hollands and Jacob Kindls sail thru waivers all day long…

    They also have a long history of loss aversion for marginal prospects that they spent high draft picks on.

    If everything breaks right, he’s a player that no team really covets like a Gryba.That’s faint praise.

    The last marginal prospect that they held on to was Brandon Davidson, just last year.

  26. AsiaOil says:

    Centre of attention,

    I saw Gretzky’s first goal as an Oiler in the WHA and saw about 95% of his Oilers games – about half live. He was the best player of his day but the last years of his career bled into a different era where skating, size, systems play, goaltending, and defense increased drastically. His body started to break down but his time and space to make plays also decreased radically. The game changed and the all-out offense of the Grezky era was gone. Loved that period but also realistic about what it was.

  27. Edmonton_fan says:

    I mean the 80’s Oilers kind of did the same thing too right? Gretz just kind of hung around center ice waiting for his line mates to snag the puck in the D-zone and feed him for a breakaway or two-on-one?

    You are mixing Gretzky up with Tim Kerr. I used to joke Kerr never knew what his own goalie looked like. My sister and I watched a game where he never crossed his own blue line – not once!

  28. Chachi says:

    Bruce McCurdy: Gretzky was a Datsyukian-class puck thief.Mind you he would often come from the blind side (ie behind the play). He caused a shitton of turnovers with that magic wand of his.

    The idea that he did nothing on the defensive side of the puck is far from the entire truth. That said, he was beyond comparison in his ability to read a transition and to jump into the opening, which some saw as goal-sucking, others as a proper use of skill. Depended who one was rooting for more than anything.

    I would also dispute his “not a fast skater” reputation. If you lined up all the Oilers speedsters for a race, if it was end to end Coffey would win it, if it was offensive blueline to goal line Anderson would win it, but if it was a race to the puck, I’d put my money on #99. Had the best first step I have ever seen, & it’s not particularly close.

    After about the 85 season he also did all of this with shadows on him all night like Sheehy and Kasper.

  29. Centre of attention says:

    AsiaOil:
    Centre of attention,

    I saw Gretzky’s first goal as an Oiler in theWHA and saw about 95% of his Oilers games – about half live. He was the best player of his day but the last years of his career bled into a different era where skating, size, systems play, goaltending, and defense increased drastically. His body started to break down but his time and space to make plays also decreased radically. The game changed and the all-out offense of the Grezky era was gone. Loved that period but also realistic about what it was.

    Agree after ’94 he started to break down and the game changed. It would be tough to pin the Kings struggles and that big minus on Gretz though. I think that ’93 playoff run really took a lot out of him physically as well as mentally. Keenan and St. Louis finished him off.

    My original point was just that the 80’s Oiler’s did play that risky run and gun style that Matt Pfeffer (former Habs analytics guy) had referred to in his tweet. Though not to the exaggerated extent that some people like to assume. (And that McCurdy quickly corrected)

    I wasn’t disputing your knowledge of 99 🙂 Sorry if it seemed that way.

  30. judgedrude says:

    Chachi:
    Centre of attention,

    As far as crazy ideas go, a 600 pound goalie would be worth exploring.

    That’s been tried.

    Sumo Goalie

  31. Genjutsu says:

    Red line has him as their 5th best defencemen in that draft, he would wind up as the 11th D taken.

    He’s not a terrible bet to make and it’s not like they needed from the 50 for a better bet.

    My ideal scenario is for him to have a terrific training camp and make the team out of camp pushing Griff and Nurse to the AHL to start the season.

  32. Chachi says:

    Centre of attention: No, no. Clearly Gretzky was incredibly diligent in his own zone and never ever cheated for offense. Not once

    (I’m joking now, just in case you can’t figure it out)

    Just saw this now. You are kind of a dick. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

  33. stevezie says:

    Jaxon: One thing that I think is crazy that coaches don’t often try is when they have a face off in the offensive zone with less than 4 or 5 seconds left and they don’t pull their goalie. Why the hell not?!?

    This drives me crazy. It’s so obvious and risk free. Is there some kind of hockey-wide gentleman’s agreement not to do this that i don’t know about?

    It’s like the Sean Avery screen. Clearly a good idea that is just considered uncouth.

  34. kinger_OIL says:

    Fog of Warts: just because I like your posts, allow me to retort. You did what I hate about the internet: misrepresent to diminish..

    – Kinger said: I’ve never heard anyone ever conclude:” well it’s a shame so and so was dominating in the AHL, before playing in the NHL:that time in the AHL clearly stunted their development.”

    – FoW says: Right: there’s never been a prospect that tops out as a dominating career minor-leaguer, who is nothing but underwhelming cups of coffee at the NHL level, because whatever skills he perfected at the AHL level simply don’t translate when the game speeds up another 10%

    – What does that have to do with my point? Did I say what you said ? Not even close

    – Prospects that top out in the minors have nothing to do with my point. There have been lots of players in the minors who dominate there but can’t make the move to the NHL. But none of those players, has anyone said: “boy they screwed that player up, by playing him too much in the minors”.

    – Was 55 games in the AHL detrimental or too many for Klef? The 125 that Davey played? Poo, he played almost 150: was that bad for his development.

    – The risk to pool-party isn’t to dominate in the AHL, then come up to the NHL, the rist is to not dominate in the NHL right away, and not develop. So do what is less-risky.

    Come on, be better…

  35. Centre of attention says:

    Chachi: Just saw this now. You are kind of a dick. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

    I’m generous with the sarcasm, sorry. I genuinely enjoy your posts man. I don’t mean any trouble ok? 🙂

  36. Centre of attention says:

    stevezie: This drives me crazy. It’s so obvious and risk free. Is there some kind of hockey-wide gentleman’s agreement not to do this that i don’t know about?

    It’s like the Sean Avery screen. Clearly a good idea that is just considered uncouth.

    I can find better words to describe Avery’s behavior on the ice than “uncouth”, if you catch my drift haha.

  37. OilClog says:

    kinger_OIL:
    Fog of Warts: just because I like your posts, allow me to retort.You did what I hate about the internet: misrepresent to diminish..

    – Kinger said: I’ve never heard anyone ever conclude:” well it’s a shame so and so was dominating in the AHL, before playing in the NHL:that time in the AHL clearly stunted their development.”

    – FoW says: Right: there’s never been a prospect that tops out as a dominating career minor-leaguer, who is nothing but underwhelming cups of coffee at the NHL level, because whatever skills he perfected at the AHL level simply don’t translate when the game speeds up another 10%

    – What does that have to do with my point?Did I say what you said ? Not even close

    – Prospects that top out in the minors have nothing to do with my point.There have been lots of players in the minors who dominate there but can’t make the move to the NHL.But none of those players, has anyone said: “boy they screwed that player up, by playing him too much in the minors”.

    – Was 55 games in the AHL detrimental or too many for Klef?The 125 that Davey played?Poo, he played almost 150: was that bad for his development.

    – The risk to pool-party isn’t to dominate in the AHL, then come up to the NHL, the rist is to not dominate in the NHL right away, and not develop.So do what is less-risky.

    Come on, be better…

    Klef and Davy are D, this comparable is bananas, not to mention neither of them being anywhere near a top 5 pick. Top 3 in reality, Columbus is in Narnia.

    Pou was not playing against men for two years before entering the NHL, nor was he a consensus top 3 pick, consensus NHL ready, with numbers that could be argued to go 1 or 2. He’s the Oilers biggest RW now?

    He’s playing wing, the absolutely easiest position to break into the league.

    Poolparty just dominated the jrs, followed it up with a near point per game performance in the men’s league playoffs.

    The Oilers have Eberle, Yakupov, Kassian all to cover any mishaps or burn outs along the way, the Oilers are actually in a pretty great position to shelter him, unless he goes super nova on Connors wing.

    The three skilled C’s need skilled wingers to player with, Poolparty is a large, skilled winger.

    Playing him in the AHL is a safe move, mayhaps even more of a coward move if going by your stated reasoning.

    Be better.

  38. Chachi says:

    Centre of attention: I’m generous with the sarcasm, sorry. I genuinely enjoy your posts man. I don’t mean any trouble ok?

    No need for apologies. Your posts make things interesting.

  39. Centre of attention says:

    Chachi: No need for apologies. Your posts make things interesting.

    Yeah I figured that Pfeffer tweet would spark some sort of discussion. Ended up being “A short history of Wayne Gretzky’s career”, lol. Not my original intent.

  40. AsiaOil says:

    Centre of attention,

    Hey no apologies needed – I’m no expert on 99 – just a guy who watched him in my younger years in EDM. The guy was the best player of his day at a time when all-out offense was unopposed by systems, size and goaltending. Having some haplessly 3rd line scrub follow Gretz around all game only meant that the hapless 3rd line scrub was on the ice for most the game against the best player in the world. A rudimentary understanding of matchups and possession now tells us what the likely result of that brilliant idea would be. IMHO Crosby is every bit as talented and likely more well rounded than 99. But the evolution of systems, the fact that even 3rd line guys are now are pretty damn good players, and goaltending that isn’t keystone cops material has limited his impact. Love the Wayner – but now every time I see that famous overtime goal against Calgary in 88 I think – wow – 99 is up-ice of the defense in his own end while killing a penalty in overtime and Vernon was some crappy goaltender. All of that being true doesn’t make 99 any less great or the experience of beating the godless flame any less fun. Times change.

  41. Revolved says:

    It is very interesting to look at the whole organization depth chart, as it reveals some holes that I didn’t think about:

    -Centre is top heavy and now we can’t even fill out the condors roster with Bogdan gone. Is there an obvious AHL contract to fill that spot? Doesn’t Roy deserve another AHL deal?

    -Left wing is also not the position of strength I would have expected.

    -The condors have fewer right handed players than the oilers. Whoa.

    Also, now that the depth chart is complete at most positions, would anyone care to hazard a guess on the risers and fallers this year based on this list?

    – My risers: Caggiula(LW), Lander (C), Kassian/Beck(RW), Reinhart(LD), Waiver pick up(RD)

    – My fallers: Maroon(LW), Letestu,(C), Puljujarvi/Pakarinen(RW), Nurse(LD), Musil(RD)

  42. Ryan says:

    Gordies Elbow: The last marginal prospect that they held on to was Brandon Davidson, just last year.

    I enjoy reading your posts on systems play. You need to post more of those.

    Davidson is a modern NHL defensemen. He can skate, transition the puck, defend, and unlike any dman on our team, he actually has a legit slap shot.

    I was honestly on record here worrying about losing Davidson to waivers at the start of last season.

  43. A-Frame says:

    Jaxon,

    stevezie,

    I’m a goalie and when I was young (playing Atom I think) my coach tried this once. The other team scored, he never tried it again.

  44. who says:

    I would like to see an nhl coach try to hang a winger at the other teams blueline while his other 4 skaters defend in their end. Tried doing this while coaching kids and believe it or not it is hard to get that forward to stay out there. He tends to drift back into his own end. Hard habit to break but I’ve often thought a team might get more scoring chances than it gives up if it tried this. Especially if they change equipment or net sizes to make the goalies less dominant.

  45. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Wow, Mike Vernon was “some crappy goaltender” now? I guess the Flames never really did turn that corner until they got Karri Ramo & Jonas Hiller

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