NEWBURY TRAIN SONGS

The Bakersfield Condors have deployed Kris Newbury—34—once so far this season, while not yet playing Greg Chase, 21. On the other hand, Jujhar Khaira is on the top line and flourishing. Here is a quick look at deployment so far this season among Bakersfield Condors. (all photos by Mark Williams).

  • No. 2, Mark Fraser. Two games, third pairing and 14 pims. The Oilers must have hired him for just this reason and he is delivering. As long as he stays healthy we should expect him to play most of the year. Has played with Joey Laleggia in both games.
  • No. 3, Dillon Simpson. Seems to be getting a little push, playing with Matt Benning on what I would guess is the second pairing. No boxcars so far, he is +1 and is getting PK time.
  • No. 4, Matt Benning. He is 1-1-2 and is playing a feature role, including power-play time. Simon Boisvert tells us that he is close to NHL-ready. He is probably among the ice-time leaders for the Condors, and has eight shots on goal in the two games.
  • No. 6, David Musil. Has yet to play, and that could be a tell. Musil is a good AHL-level defender, so the fact he isn’t playing is probably either an injury or a decision to rotate others ahead of him to start the year.

russell-khaira-and-hamilton

  • No. 7, Jujhar Khaira. He has posted 3-1-4 in the first two games and appears NHL-ready in all phases. Playing on the top line with Ryan Hamilton and Taylor Beck, he is flourishing offensively—the one area we could reasonably assume he would be shy. His eight shots on goal co-lead the team.
  • No. 8, Griffin Reinhart. Playing on what looks like the top pairing with Jordan Oesterle, he is +2 and the star of a twitter vine that shows him winning a fight. This is a big season for the big man.
  • No. 11, Kris Newbury. He is an excellent AHL player, has been since 2005. He last played an NHL game in 2013-14, one suspects he will serve a depth role—and that also means a prospect will be in the pressbox or Norfolk. One is a bad idea, the other a good one.
  • No. 12, Ryan Hamilton. I am not ordinarily a fan of AHL vets, but Hamilton plays a prominent role and gives the Condors (along with Beck) some certainty on the top line. You want prospects to develop, but it is also important for them to avoid being overmatched. Hamilton is 2gp, 0-2-2 so far.

PLATZER WILLIAMS2

  • No. 14, Kyle Platzer. He is getting 2C minutes from what I am seeing (playing on a line with Joey Benik and Jaedon Descheneau) and has an assist in the two games. It is a big season for him—not in terms of of 40-point season or anything—and we should expect a regular shift and some success in multiple areas. It looks like he is in a position to prove himself this season.
  • No. 15, Jordan Oesterle. I am still a little confused by his quick demotion this fall, but he appears to be on the top pairing with Griffin Reinhart. The PP time is going to Laleggia and Benning (from what I can see), so this is a strange start based on Oesterle’s established skill set.
  • No. 17, Joey Laleggia. Has a power-play assist and appears to be getting plenty of playing time in the discipline. I think he is third pair at evens (with Mark Fraser) on what is a classic puck mover/stay-at-home pairing. I watched him quite a bit in training camp, he is a chaos defender and that brings some issues. Would need to make it as a pure offensive defender, possibly a rover role. Seven shots on goal so far.
  • No. 18, Josh Currie. A mild surprise in that he has played just one game so far, possibly losing playing time to newcomer Newbury. He has a range of skills, suspect he will emerge as a regular.

MOROZ WILLIAMS

  • No. 19, Mitch Moroz. Has played in both games, no points so far. Playing on what is clearly a 4line with Braden Christoffer and rotating centers, the college kids are playing above both men so far and will need to prove their value from the depth minutes.
  • No. 20, Zach Pochiro. I am going to cheer for him because it has to be a tough spot for him.
  • No. 21, Joey Benik. Early star of the team, two goals in the first two games. He has five shots and has been doing business on a second line that includes two other prospects. Lots to like about this prospect.
  • No. 22, Joel Rechlicz. Big man threw some thundering fists in preseason, has not yet played in a league game since the regular season began.
  • No. 23, Braden Christoffer. He plays on the 4line with Moroz, but is getting more done. He has six shots on goal and does a lot of busy work. No idea if he can score at all at this level but he does get noticed.
  • No. 25, Greg Chase. Young man in the middle of his entry-level deal hasn’t played a game yet.
  • No. 28, Mikael Tam. Depth defender hasn’t played yet.
  • No. 29, Scott Allen. I bet they love him, he is 2, 1-1-2 so far and playing in front of a bunch of prospect. At 26, there is little chance of an NHL career but they are playing him a lot (with Jere Sallinen and Patrick Russell) so maybe one of them makes the grade.

laurikainen-williams

  • No. 30, Eetu Laurikainen. He was optioned to Norfolk and then recalled with Laurent Brossoit got the call from Edmonton. Has not played yet.
  • No. 34, Nick Ellis. He is the early star among AHL rookies (along with Benning), posting a .925 save percentage in the first two games of the season. I hesitate to say he will end up pushing Brossoit for the NHL backup job, because it is much too early. Suffice to say he has looked good so far.
  • No. 36, Patrick Russell. Has done some things (2gp, 0-1-1, 7pims) to get noticed early, but the big item here is foot speed. Kind of the opposite-Laleggia, in that there might be a shortcoming so great that an NHL future is not possible. Early days for Russell, but the boots looked slow in training camp.
  • No. 39, Jaedon Descheneau. Very likely to emerge as the new Josh Winquist (we will all spend hours wondering why the Oilers don’t sign him to an NHL deal), he has speed and skill in abundance. Stay healthy young man. 2gp, 0-1-1 so far.
  • No. 40, Jere Sallinen. Scored a nice goal last night (2gp, 1-0-1) and has plenty of Sm-Liiga and KHL experience. He should push for an NHL job at some point in the next 18 months based on resume.
  • No. 41, Taylor Beck. He is 2gp, 0-3-3 and has to be on Edmonton’s radar—although all of the RH wingers appear to be doing pretty well in Edmonton. He is on the 1line and playing very well.

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41 Responses to "NEWBURY TRAIN SONGS"

  1. RexLibris says:

    I hadn’t made the Jaedon Descheneau connection until just today.

    He was the player taken with the 5th round pick the Blues got from the Flames for Kris Russell.

    Interesting backstory:

    Feaster could have simply taken Russell as a free-agent during a period when the Blues had waived him, but he had gone unclaimed.

    Feaster defended trading for him because it preserved an element of his RFA status and lengthened team control of the player more than if they’d simply claimed him. (Then again, Feaster believed he could offer sheet O’Reilly and not lose him on waivers, so take his CBA opinion with a grain of salt).

    So the Flames gave the Blues a pick in exchange.

    So if Feaster hadn’t traded for Russell, the Blues wouldn’t have selected Descheneau, he wouldn’t have been let go by the team and the Oilers wouldn’t have signed him to Bakersfield this summer.

  2. "Steve Smith" says:

    RexLibris: (Then again, Feaster believed he could offer sheet O’Reilly and not lose him on waivers, so take his CBA opinion with a grain of salt).

    I continue to believe that he was right about this, and that he took an enormous amount of undeserved grief over it.

  3. Lowetide says:

    “Steve Smith”: I continue to believe that he was right about this, and that he took an enormous amount of undeserved grief over it.

    Interesting. The media and hockey industry folks I talk too (my dog) universally pan him on that. Would love to know they are all wrong.

  4. lynn says:

    I think Jujhar Khaira is going to have an NHL career.

    Pitlick and Slepyshev beat him to a roster spot on the Oilers. The inn is crowded on the bottom six.

    Khaira could be a future waiver gem for another NHL team.

  5. "Steve Smith" says:

    Lowetide,

    On its face, section 13.23 of the CBA would require him to pass through waivers. However, the clarification to this rule states “All Players on a Club’s Reserve List and Restricted Free Agent List will be exempt from the application of CBA 13.23 Waivers in the case of a mid-season signing.”

    O’Reilly was on Colorado’s Restricted Free Agent list; he would have been exempt from the application of section 13.23 in the event of a mid-season signing.

    I understand that some people, including apparently Bill Daly, take the position that “mid-season signing” refers only to a mid-season signing by the team who had the player on their list (in this case, Colorado). I can see nothing in the language of the CBA supporting such a limitation.

    Addendum: I’m a lawyer, but I don’t practice in this area and, in any case, lawyers are not invariably right about the law in areas where they do practice (in fact, at least a few times per month, I go into court and argue that other lawyers are wrong about the law in areas that they practice). But the Flames’ lawyers and Ryan O’Reilly’s agent (not sure whether he’s a lawyer, but he should at least be learned in the application of the CBA) apparently agreed with me on this point, and I think they were right.

  6. Lowetide says:

    “Steve Smith”:
    Lowetide,

    On its face, section 13.23 of the CBA would require him to pass through waivers.However, the clarification to this rule states “All Players on a Club’s Reserve List and Restricted Free Agent List will be exempt from the application of CBA 13.23 Waivers in the case of a mid-season signing.”

    O’Reilly was on Colorado’s Restricted Free Agent list; he would have been exempt from the application of section 13.23 in the event of a mid-season signing.

    I understand that some people, including apparently Bill Daly, take the position that “mid-season signing” refers only to a mid-season signing by the team who had the player on their list (in this case, Colorado).I can see nothing in the language of the CBA supporting such a limitation.

    Ah. Thanks, and that makes sense. I love the NHL because these things are like a giant game of Stupid vs. Stupider and this appears to be an example.

  7. Lowetide says:

    Dylan Wells had a strong start but a wobbly 10 days, is up 4-1 and has stopped 26 of 27 tonight.

  8. Lowetide says:

    Tyler Vesel with another assist tonight, he is now 3gp, 1-2-3 with most of his third game to go.

  9. The Hermit says:

    "Steve Smith",

    Very interesting, good find!

  10. "Steve Smith" says:

    The Hermit:
    "Steve Smith",

    Very interesting, good find!

    I didn’t come up with this analysis myself – can’t remember where I first saw it, but it was floating around at the time of the offer sheet. It was overtaken, however, by the dominant narrative that the Flames were real morons.

  11. The Hermit says:

    “Steve Smith”,

    I pilloried Feaster in my mind also.

  12. Lowetide says:

    Vesel adds a goal, now at 1-1-2 for the night.

  13. MrEd says:

    Pitlick. On one goal he nearly breaks his upper-body, on another he nearly breaks his face (an incredible goal). Pitlick.

  14. Lowetide says:

    Markus Niemelainen with his first assist of the season this evening.

  15. Centre of attention says:

    Lowetide:
    Vesel adds a goal, now at 1-1-2 for the night.

    He roomed with McDavid the first year during orientation camp.

    It was a sign.

  16. nelson88 says:

    I don’t know if it is my love of prospects or disdain for arrogance but I’ll admit to really enjoying these non game day threads.

    Feels like I’m sitting in the kitchen with a few good friends chatting and getting radio updates on an exciting topic. The a-hole neighbours are out for the evening and there is no yelling or throwing of chairs.

  17. Lowetide says:

    Wells wins for the Petes, now 9gp, 2.91 .919 for the season. Excellent numbers, despite the tough week.

  18. MrEd says:

    Stauffers bit with Mr. Hutton was pure radio gold.

  19. dustrock says:

    "Steve Smith":
    Lowetide,

    On its face, section 13.23 of the CBA would require him to pass through waivers.However, the clarification to this rule states “All Players on a Club’s Reserve List and Restricted Free Agent List will be exempt from the application of CBA 13.23 Waivers in the case of a mid-season signing.”

    O’Reilly was on Colorado’s Restricted Free Agent list; he would have been exempt from the application of section 13.23 in the event of a mid-season signing.

    I understand that some people, including apparently Bill Daly, take the position that “mid-season signing” refers only to a mid-season signing by the team who had the player on their list (in this case, Colorado).I can see nothing in the language of the CBA supporting such a limitation.

    Addendum: I’m a lawyer, but I don’t practice in this area and, in any case, lawyers are not invariably right about the law in areas where they do practice (in fact, at least a few times per month, I go into court and argue that other lawyers are wrong about the law in areas that they practice).But the Flames’ lawyers and Ryan O’Reilly’s agent (not sure whether he’s a lawyer, but he should at least be learned in the application of the CBA) apparently agreed with me on this point, and I think they were right.

    I’m no CBA lawyer but I read it the same way. Unless “club” is clearly defined in the definitions, it would be interpreted as “Club that has contract with player”. The fact that the section clearly mentions “in the case of mid-season signing” is hugely important here

  20. Lowetide says:

    Now 1-2-3 for Vesel.

  21. Genjutsu says:

    Not sure if this has been discussed but how much of what we are seeing with Kris Russell this season is related to his partner?

    Andrej Sekera is a fine player and has been on top of his game from the world cup on in.

    With a good coach and system and playing behind the Swedish chefs this is a pretty decent spot for him despite his handedness handicap.

    Though I did have a higher opinion of the player to start the season than some:

    I respect the package Jim Nill paid for him too much to not believe he has value to a playoff team.

  22. stush18 says:

    nelson88:
    I don’t know if it is my love of prospects or disdain for arrogance but I’ll admit to really enjoying these non game day threads.

    Feels like I’m sitting in the kitchen with a few good friends chatting and getting radio updates on an exciting topic. The a-hole neighbours are out for the evening and there is no yelling or throwing of chairs.

    I do too. I typically try to stay away from the game day threads, at least during the game, because conversation is hard

  23. stevezie says:

    MrEd:
    Pitlick. On one goal he nearly breaks his upper-body, on another he nearly breaks his face (an incredible goal).Pitlick.

    I loved Ethan Moreau because, among other reasons, he played like me.

    When he lost it I felt extra sadness, as I knew what criticisms were true of him were true of me too.

    I am beginning to like Pitlick.

    EDIT: Anyone ball or ice hockey teams needing someone shitty and reckless can find me on twitter.

  24. Seismic Source says:

    All Western teams lose again tonight. This has been an amazing start to the year.

  25. supernova says:

    Lowetide:
    Wells wins for the Petes, now 9gp, 2.91 .919 for the season. Excellent numbers, despite the tough week.

    Lowetide,

    Have you ever had anyone on your show from the OHL explain why Wells gets the Matt Murray comp.

    Murray’s Junior numbers and then pro numbers don’t add up to me.
    Just wondering what scouts see in detail.

    Other goalie note the best part of The Monster’s injury is that Nick Ellis gets more games and early.

  26. Lowetide says:

    supernova: Lowetide,

    Have you ever had anyone on your show from the OHL explain why Wells gets the Matt Murray comp.

    Murray’s Junior numbers and then pro numbers don’t add up to me.
    Just wondering what scouts see in detail.

    Other goalie note the best part of The Monster’s injury is that Nick Ellis gets more games and early.

    I have had Steve Kournianos and Brock Otten on, and we have discussed him. Good story idea though, will have one or both on in the near future.

  27. Lowetide says:

    Ethan Bear scores his first of the season.

  28. wheatnoil says:

    Good day for prospects!

  29. supernova says:

    Lowetide: I have had Steve Kournianos and Brock Otten on, and we have discussed him. Good story idea though, will have one or both on in the near future.

    Lowetide,

    I think I caught one of them in the past about him.
    Just came to mind again though with Murray extension.

    Looking at Murray’s career he certainly gets belief in his ability early.

    Not saying he won’t be worth his extension but with so little NHL experience it made more sense to me to wait before committing.

    After all the hockey I have watched in my life I still have no read on Goalies just wander what it is they see, then how that migrates to Wells.

  30. Lowetide says:

    supernova: Lowetide,

    I think I caught one of them in the past about him.
    Just came to mind again though with Murray extension.

    Looking at Murray’s career he certainly gets belief in his ability early.

    Not saying he won’t be worth his extension but with so little NHL experience it made more sense to me to wait before committing.

    After all the hockey I have watched in my life I still have no read on Goalies just wander what it is they see, then how that migrates to Wells.

    Me either. Honestly, I kind of giggle at people who are sure of goalies and their futures. It is like projecting knuckleball pitchers.

  31. supernova says:

    Lowetide: Me either. Honestly, I kind of giggle at people who are sure of goalies and their futures. It is like projecting knuckleball pitchers.

    Lowetide,

    Haha Knuckleballers is a good analogy.

    I lived in Medicine Hat when Bunz was the goalie there.

    My business partner and I would go to lots of games.
    I was very sure Pitlick would make the NHL.
    I had no read at all on Bunz.

    I told him often that Pitlick would be a better pro than Linden Vey. I even made him a bet on Pitlick versus Emersom Etem.

    Thank you Pitlick I was getting close to eating a lot of crow on him.

    I had wrote him off. So happy for him. (And me 😬)

  32. dustrock says:

    Lowetide: Me either. Honestly, I kind of giggle at people who are sure of goalies and their futures. It is like projecting knuckleball pitchers.

    Complete spitballing here, but I would guess the composure and athleticism would be the two things they’d look at early because it’s hard to teach those.

    Some of these young men can probably have technique coached to them.

    So maybe for Wells they see similar physical gifts, now track him in the next 4 years.

  33. jm363561 says:

    nelson88:
    I don’t know if it is my love of prospects or disdain for arrogance but I’ll admit to really enjoying these non game day threads.

    Feels like I’m sitting in the kitchen with a few good friends chatting and getting radio updates on an exciting topic. The a-hole neighbours are out for the evening and there is no yelling or throwing of chairs.

    30 contributions and no mention of Corsi, Hall trade or Kris Russell!

  34. Chachi says:

    "Steve Smith":
    Lowetide,

    On its face, section 13.23 of the CBA would require him to pass through waivers.However, the clarification to this rule states “All Players on a Club’s Reserve List and Restricted Free Agent List will be exempt from the application of CBA 13.23 Waivers in the case of a mid-season signing.”

    O’Reilly was on Colorado’s Restricted Free Agent list; he would have been exempt from the application of section 13.23 in the event of a mid-season signing.

    I understand that some people, including apparently Bill Daly, take the position that “mid-season signing” refers only to a mid-season signing by the team who had the player on their list (in this case, Colorado).I can see nothing in the language of the CBA supporting such a limitation.

    Addendum: I’m a lawyer, but I don’t practice in this area and, in any case, lawyers are not invariably right about the law in areas where they do practice (in fact, at least a few times per month, I go into court and argue that other lawyers are wrong about the law in areas that they practice).But the Flames’ lawyers and Ryan O’Reilly’s agent (not sure whether he’s a lawyer, but he should at least be learned in the application of the CBA) apparently agreed with me on this point, and I think they were right.

    The actual wording in the current CBA pretty clearly indicates that in the situation O’Reilly was in he would have had to clear waivers after signing with any team other than Colorado. The problem, as I recall was that the NHL/NHLPA relationship was being governed by an MOU at the time that had yet to be finalized into the current CBA and the wording was open to interpretation. Feaster was careless to think that the NHL would interpret the rule in his favour and should have confirmed it with them before signing O’Reilly.

  35. stevezie says:

    jm363561: 30 contributions and no mention of Corsi, Hall trade or Kris Russell!

    well, until now.

    Thanks.

  36. OF17 says:

    Chachi: The actual wording in the current CBA pretty clearly indicates that in the situation O’Reilly was in he would have had to clear waivers after signing with any team other than Colorado. The problem, as I recall was that the NHL/NHLPA relationship was being governed by an MOU at the time that had yet to be finalized into the current CBA and the wording was open to interpretation. Feaster was careless to think that the NHL would interpret the rule in his favour and should have confirmed it with them before signing O’Reilly.

    I think the issue had to do with O’Reilly playing games in the KHL rather than just being a holdout. As I recall, free agents signed mid-season that had played in a European pro league the year they were signed had to clear waivers before being allowed to join the club. The same rule allowed the Islanders to claim Nabokov after he signed with Detroit a few years back. So if O’Reilly hadn’t’ve played those 12 games with Magnitogorsk in 12/13, the offer sheet would’ve been valid.

    I think the loan rule would supersede that one, eg if Berglund decided to come to Bakersfield this year and Skelleftea let him, it wouldn’t violate the principle, but O’Reilly voiding the KHL contract and signing as an NHL free agent subjected him to the “Ruotsalainen” rule, exposing him to waivers.

    As an aside, there was a lot of verbal around O’Reilly not being worth his contract when he signed it, but I’d move around a few pieces to slot a $7.5 million Ryan O’Reilly behind Connor McDavid these days. Fantastic player. If anyone in the league is the heir to the Bergeron crown, it’s him.

  37. Chachi says:

    OF17: I think the issue had to do with O’Reilly playing games in the KHL rather than just being a holdout. As I recall, free agents signed mid-season that had played in a European pro league the year they were signed had to clear waivers before being allowed to join the club. The same rule allowed the Islanders to claim Nabokov after he signed with Detroit a few years back. So if O’Reilly hadn’t’ve played those 12 games with Magnitogorsk in 12/13, the offer sheet would’ve been valid.

    I think the loan rule would supersede that one, eg if Berglund decided to come to Bakersfield this year and Skelleftea let him, it wouldn’t violate the principle, but O’Reilly voiding the KHL contract and signing as an NHL free agent subjected him to the “Ruotsalainen” rule, exposing him to waivers.

    As an aside, there was a lot of verbal around O’Reilly not being worth his contract when he signed it, but I’d move around a few pieces to slot a $7.5 million Ryan O’Reilly behind Connor McDavid these days. Fantastic player. If anyone in the league is the heir to the Bergeron crown, it’s him.

    Yup, playing games in the KHL triggered the waiver rule. As soon as he played those games the only team that could sign him and have him play that season without him having to clear waivers was Colorado or a team Colorado traded his rights to.

  38. kinger_OIL says:

    Chachi,

    – See this is a civil discourse. There is the “law” and the language surrounding it and a whole bunch of opinions on how to interpret it, and understanding the circumstances. All the comments from the posters on this have been respectful, and all have have been prefaced with something like: “I’, no expert, but I am a lawyer, etc”. That’s a nice discourse: different opnions

    – The reason I bring this up is I wish the discussions about applying statistical analysis onto players performance, and making prjections or conclusions: it too has to have the same caveats as when interpreting law.

    – I’ve read different articles that suggest that the outcome of a game or players performance is anywhere above 40% attributed to luck. So the use of statistics has to be used in that context.

    – The use of stats in hockey is at its infancy, and still eveloving. There are different stats that become established, or evolve or are dismissed. This is exactly how law has evovled over centuries. Sure a lot of laws are codified, but it is a very nuanced beast.

    – Stats is the same way. I don’t like it when posters come in here and use stats as a weapon, to cherry-pick their narrative, and then use some selective part of it to dismiss the opnions of others

    – I wish we could all be a little more humble and accepting, and have discussions about interpreting stats in the same manner that this discussion on the CBA law is being conducted.

    – Quit being so absolute. Quit poking people becasue their beliefs are different than yours. Quit using opinions to blast others. There is a lot of great work in here: our discussions need to be at the same level as the good-faith work some are sharing with all of us.

    – End of rant!

    – P.S. I have both a legal and statistical education background: and have not worked as a lawyer or a stats person, and it does not make me an expert in either field either.

  39. meanashell11 says:

    dustrock: Complete spitballing here, but I would guess the composure and athleticism would be the two things they’d look at early because it’s hard to teach those.

    Some of these young men can probably have technique coached to them.

    So maybe for Wells they see similar physical gifts, now track him in the next 4 years.

    I am the father of a retired goalie, here are my thoughts on characteristics to watch for:

    very strong self confidence – goalies are the team goat, there’s a saying, when a forward makes a mistake it’s a turnover, when a defenceman makes a mistake, it’s a shot on goal; when a goalie makes a mistake, it’s on the scoreboard. It’s always the goalies fault, you see the other parents whispering and nodding even though their stud defencman son fell over backwards as the winger went by. After the game they congratulate their kid with the wink, nod, nod in the direction of the goalie after a loss. Young goalies have to be able to shake it off and move on.

    solid family support system – even with a lot of confidence, there will be times that being able to lean on family is very important. You know that time after practice when he gets into the car with his hoodie pulled over his head and crosses his arms and looks down at the floor after the coach just spent practice telling everyone that that goal would not have gone if if the goalie was taller… That is when family support steps in.

    ability to shrug off injuries – I do not know how they do it, but the good, young ones have an ability to play through injury. My son once had both groins pulled during a tournament. When he was on the ice, he was in bed with ice/heat on his groin. Then taped up to the point he could not move, but once on the ice he looked like an octopus making saves. Once he had a fever of 101 and there was no backup for the tournament. He played through, when the puck was at the other end a few times he just fell over in his crease. But they won.

    These same characteristics have made him a fine young man now his hockey career is over, made him a very strong student as well.

  40. gogliano says:

    kinger_OIL:
    Chachi,

    – See this is a civil discourse.There is the “law” and the language surrounding it and a whole bunch of opinions on how to interpret it, and understanding the circumstances.All the comments from the posters on this have been respectful, and all have have been prefaced with something like: “I’, no expert, but I am a lawyer, etc”.That’s a nice discourse: different opnions

    – The reason I bring this up is I wish the discussions about applying statistical analysis onto players performance, and making prjections or conclusions: it too has to have the same caveats as when interpreting law.

    – I’ve read different articles that suggest that the outcome of a game orplayers performance is anywhere above 40% attributed to luck.So the use of statistics has to be used in that context.

    – The use of stats in hockey is at its infancy, and still eveloving.There are different stats that become established, or evolve or are dismissed.This is exactly how law has evovled over centuries.Sure a lot of laws are codified, but it is a very nuanced beast.

    – Stats is the same way.I don’t like it when posters come in here and use stats as a weapon, to cherry-pick their narrative, and then use some selective part of it to dismiss the opnions of others

    – I wish we could all be a little more humble and accepting, and have discussions about interpreting stats in the same manner that this discussion on the CBA law is being conducted.

    – Quit being so absolute.Quit poking people becasue their beliefs are different than yours.Quit using opinions to blast others.There is a lot of great work in here: our discussions need to be at the same level as the good-faith work some are sharing with all of us.

    – End of rant!

    – P.S. I have both a legal and statistical education background: and have not worked as a lawyer or a stats person, and it does not make me an expert in either field either.

    Also someone with a law and stats background (work as a lawyer), and agree with this sentiment. One of the things you notice in both the practice of law and academic empirical work, however, is that people pretty quickly become aggressive in defending their position, even when the position is met by other plausible positions on the other side. It’s easier to see in law because you can — after zealously believing in and advocating your legal case — lose cases by reasonable arbiters of the law. In academics or online message boards, it’s easier to dismiss Reviewer #2 or kenbonezone69 as a loon who hasn’t considered the issue.

  41. "Steve Smith" says:

    Chachi,

    OF17,

    Late to respond, but…
    1. Yes, the KHL games were relevant – that’s what would trigger the section 13.23 waivers in the first place. However…
    2. The clarification I quoted would still, in my view, operate to exempt O’Reilly from those waivers in the event that he’d signed with Calgary.
    3. Chachi, you evidently believe otherwise – can you explain why (if this conversation isn’t over, I mean)?

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