OILERS NO. 7 PROSPECT (winter 2016): CALEB JONES

Caleb Jones is one of the most interesting prospects on the Oilers current list. His draft day scouting reports suggested humble offense and good wheels, with some learning to do defensively. In point of fact, Caleb Jones has shown he can post some offense—on the 5×5. This is a player worth following, because it appears his year over year progress has him on the move as a prospect.

PREVIOUSLY NO. 7 ON THE WINTER LIST

  • December 2006: G Devan Dubnyk (312)
  • December 2007: C Riley Nash (260)
  • December 2008: D Jeff Petry (383)
  • December 2009: D Jeff Petry (383)
  • December 2010: C Tyler Pitlick (46)
  • December 2011: D Martin Gernat (0)
  • December 2012: C Jujhar Khaira (15)
  • December 2013: D Anton Belov (57)
  • December 2014: C Jujhar Khaira (15)
  • December 2015: G Anders Nilsson (57)

This is a fabulous list of prospects, from Devan Dubnyk through Riley Nash and Jeff Petry. The later years have Tyler Pitlick, young Jujhar Khaira and goalie Anders Nilsson—none likely to have the impact of Dubnyk or Petry. Interesting to see two more names who left the Oilers with plenty of quality work left in their careers. Losing organizations often suffer this malady, and Edmonton did for most of this century.

caleb jones capture

WHAT THEY SAID ON DRAFT DAY

  • Future Considerations: Jones is a good skater, with a good stride and good speed to join a rush and then get back quickly. He shows some puck skill that would be expected of someone related to Seth, who is a confident puck-carrier.
  • Caleb Jones:I play a bit like my brother, I think we’re both two-way defencemen. I think I’m a little more of a physical and aggressive player than he is but I’d say in the sense of the entire game we’re pretty alike.”
  • Phil Myre, ISS:  “Competitive defenseman, Plays with a lot of urgency, takes the body, competes. He is a good skater with good mobility. Not creative, he can make a good first pass. Not committed and drafted by Portland in the WHL. Will follow his brother’s footstep in the W but not as talented. Work ethic will help his projection but not dominant in any area”.
  • Black Book got a look at Jones at the 5 Nations Cup and had good things to say. The scouting service noted his impressive positioning on the power play and his dependability in all situations.
  • ISS: Jones has shown promising development – he is coming into his own and has added more facets to his game over the last two seasons. Great work on the puck and advancing very well whether springing his forwards in the neutral zone or using the boards to find his man, doesn’t put his teammates in vulnerable positions. Much quicker and mobile then he was last season, quick on his feet and uses his edges well when carrying the puck. Although an offensive mindset he doesn’t get ahead of himself in the defensive zone. Strong development upward curve has him as a very intriguing prospect heading into the draft. Although doesn’t possess highend upside he has shown the ability to compete.

PREVIOUS RANKINGS

  • Summer 2015: No. 17
  • Winter 2015: No. 13
  • Summer 2016: No. 7
  • Winter 2016: No. 7

Early rankings were based partly on Jones draft profiles, which suggested much of his overall value would come from playing without the puck. His offensive abilities are real, and his even-strength point totals a year ago suggest we might be looking at a player who can help in all situations.

jones capture

2015-16

  • Ben Berland: Caleb Jones has fairly decent skating skills in terms of backwards and forwards, stops and starts, but I did notice that he did get beat to this left side a couple times during the game.  Nothing too glaring nor too bad that a little gap control wouldn’t cure.  As with most young defencemen, time and patience  are required.  The footspeed will come with time and development. Source
  • More Berland: The passing skills are there and Jones not only makes great passes to the forwards, but also communicates well with his defense partner in terms of passing back and forth in transition or reverses.  The stickhandling is there as well.  Nothing too elaborate or fancy and not too long.  Everything is done quickly and with great efficiency.  Not a lot of wasted energy or movement with this kid.  He paces himself well and as the game wore on, his shifts become more frequent and greater in length.  I was quite impressed with Jones’ read and react ability.  He rarely gets caught out of position and has a great understanding of the game. Source

2016-17

jones-numbers

  • Jones even-strength scoring a year ago was outstanding (Ethan Bear, playing in the same league, went 69, 7-21-28 0.406, same season) and his overall offense this season suggests we are looking at a player capable of holding offensive value (should he make it to the NHL). The question is how much offense will come with him to pro hockey?
  • Rick Carriere, Sr. Director of Player Development: “He was a good skater coming in, but he’s moving the puck better. He transitions the puck very effectively. When he gets the puck on a turnover in the neutral zone, he turns it up and makes a play. The area I saw a lot of growth in was his defensive game. With his rush reads, he was a lot more patient, he had a better stick, good body position and he was able to keep things to the outside. His defensive game really improved throughout the year.” Source
  • Game Notes, Young Stars v. Vancouver Sept 16:  LD Caleb Jones—0-0-0, +1 and one shot. Played a strong game and his wheels are excellent. He has size, skill and a rugged style, so that gives him a chance to play in a lot of situations. I would guess the Jones-Benning pairing played the most and he didn’t look out of place in any situation. Recovered nicely a few times. The man can wheel. Source
  • Game Notes, Young Stars v. Calgary Sept 17: LD Caleb Jones: 0-0-0, -2 and two shots. He was my No. 2 star, very mobile player who can battle and win, while also having the wherewithal to get that puck to a good place and on its way. I think he is emerging as a legit NHL talent and he may hang around later than many of the other blue. The fact he received top-pairing treatment in these two games is a big deal in my opinion. Coaching staff loves him, and for good reason. Source

benning-russell-jones

THE FUTURE

I have mentioned several times during this series that No. 2 to No. 8 are all in the same range, and I am more convinced now than ever. The four defensemen (Benning, Paigin, Bear and now Jones) we have looked at so far (No. 8 is a forward) could easily be rearranged, although I do think Matt Benning has enough speed and range of skills to be considered slightly ahead of the rest of the group.

Caleb Jones could be the best defenseman on the Oilers list right now, I just can’t see it from here. In a way, this is a bad spot to rank these players, as Jones could go off offensively (and at evens) over the rest of the season. Plenty of track to go, and that speed is going to get him real chances at the next level.

For the rest of this season, expect tightening defense and more offense, evens and power play. For next year, I think a strong AHL season probably gets him an NHL chance as early as fall 2018 should he continue to develop.

THE 2015 DRAFT

  • Connor McDavid, No. 1 overall. Leads the NHL in points. Crazy. Graduated.
  • D Caleb Jones, No. 117 overall. Impressive young player has improved greatly since the draft. Good wheels, impressive offense, improving defense. No. 7 prospect, Winter 2016.
  • D Ethan Bear, No. 124 overall. He is progressing in all areas and has a nice range of skills. Bear’s progress since draft day has been impressive. No. 6 prospect, Winter 2016.
  • D John Marino, No. 154 overall. Mobile offensive defender posting some crooked numbers early in NCAA career. A candidate for the Winter Top 20.
  • G Miroslav Svoboda, No. 208 overall. Stopping everything in a faraway Czech league. What does that mean? A candidate for the Winter Top 20.
  • D Ziyat Paigin, No. 209 overall. A transfer to Sochi unlocked this player in 2015-16, and an untimely injury this season cannot dampen enthusiasm. No. 5 prospect, Winter 2016.

ROLLING TOP 20

rolling-top-20

  • The Oilers should be covered at center for years to come, although the team seems determined to find a spot for Caggiula.
  • Wingers are going to be vital moving forward, Edmonton has some inside the Top 20 but they are not top end beyond Puljujarvi (and Benson has a chance).
  • Defense is always a need, but years of focus on the position (2013+) have solidified the left side, righties still needed.
  • Goal is getting some help and we will discuss that position as we moved forward in the countdown.

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49 Responses to "OILERS NO. 7 PROSPECT (winter 2016): CALEB JONES"

  1. jp says:

    It’s very promising that Jones, Bear, Paigin, Marino have all taken a nice step in their draft +1. Added to Reinhart and Benning, I figure it’s fair to expect 2 of these guys to make a real contribution (following the Chorney, Petry and Wild example).

    It’ll be real interesting to see who can keep developing and make the jump. These guys all look like they have a chance.

  2. Lowetide says:

    jp:
    It’s very promising that Jones, Bear, Paigin, Marino have all taken a nice step in their draft +1. Added to Reinhart and Benning, I figure it’s fair to expect 2 of these guys to make a real contribution (following the Chorney, Petry and Wild example).

    It’ll be real interesting to see who can keep developing and make the jump. These guys all look like they have a chance.

    That 2015 draft has some real sustain. A LOT of prospects have stepped up from that draft, suspect some teams may get three or four NHL players out of it.

  3. Frank the dog says:

    Forgive the threadjack, I just mentioned in the last blog that before we talk about what to do, as a stats based blog, we should build a database that would allow us to record the % of infractions called, game by game for both sides of every Oiler game. Categorized by opponent, home vs away, small market or big(ger) market, American or Canadian opponent.
    At least we could get our facts straight before fretting over what to do about it.
    I care as little about a bunch of 95 year old billionaires as they care about us, but I follow this blog because it has people who relentlessly dig for the truth.

  4. Lowetide says:

    Frank the dog:
    Forgive the threadjack, I just mentioned in the last blog that before we talk about what to do, as a stats based blog, we should build a database that would allow us to record the % of infractions called, game by game for both sides of every Oiler game. Categorized by opponent, home vs away, small market or big(ger) market, American or Canadian opponent.
    At least we could get our facts straight before fretting over what to do about it.
    I care as little about a bunch of 95 year old billionaires as they care about us, but I follow this blog because it has people who relentlessly dig for the truth.

    We already know the truth. What part of the referees have bias do we need to look into?

  5. ashley says:

    Frank the dog:
    Forgive the threadjack, I just mentioned in the last blog that before we talk about what to do, as a stats based blog, we should build a database that would allow us to record the % of infractions called, game by game for both sides of every Oiler game. Categorized by opponent, home vs away, small market or big(ger) market, American or Canadian opponent.
    At least we could get our facts straight before fretting over what to do about it.
    I care as little about a bunch of 95 year old billionaires as they care about us, but I follow this blog because it has people who relentlessly dig for the truth.

    I realize this is frustrating, but it is not unique from an historical perspective. Losing teams don’t get the benefit of the doubt like winning teams do. Ask LT about the Habs of the 70’s.

    Chirpy losing teams get it even worse.

    There is some respect from the officials which is earned by teams who are consistently winning and by players who consistently perform at a high level, entirely on a subconscious level. The refs think they are impartial and calling it fair. After all, why would they go out and purposely do a bad job? But they can’t control the subtle favour to the perennial success story, or disfavour for the perennial loser. It’s human nature.

    The beauty of it is that we don’t have to use spreadsheets and stats to work ourselves up into a rage. Instead, all we have to do is win, and the problem is fixed.

  6. Ray says:

    LT,

    Further to your comments about the possible Fernando in young Pitlick, if Gus turns in an acceptable season as the backup and Benning is the real deal then would you be willing to show us the balance picture in the game day post before game one of the first round?

  7. who says:

    I am pretty sure that every fan (atic) of every team thinks the refs are hosing their team. That is human nature but it’s just not very likely. Do we really think the reffing is biased against the oilers and why in the hell would they be. Am I the only one who thinks this is a ridiculous argument.

  8. Lowetide says:

    Ray:
    LT,

    Further to your comments about the possible Fernando in young Pitlick, if Gus turns in an acceptable season as the backup and Benning is the real deal then would you be willing to show us the balance picture in the game day post before game one of the first round?

    Ha! No. The balance photo is for summer only.

  9. rope-a-dope says:

    On the referees piece, one of the key things you may find is just how differently certain ones call it. Obviously we already know that some call it tight and some don’t call a damn thing but it would be interesting to see who’s calling what.

  10. jonrmcleod says:

    Look at that balance in the top 7!

  11. Lowetide says:

    Rex Libris was doing a ref item a little while ago, there may be info there for those who are interested.

    http://www.theoilersrig.com/2016/07/oilers-officiating-review-game-5/

  12. jonrmcleod says:

    Lowetide,

    Rex is in the midst of a bigger project the year. I volunteered to review a couple of games for him. I keep telling him that his eventual expose will usher in the age of the robot refs.

  13. Lowetide says:

    jonrmcleod:
    Lowetide,

    Rex is in the midst of a bigger project the year. I volunteered to review a couple of games for him. I keep telling him that his eventual expose will usher in the age of the robot refs.

    They will all be called Mcgoo.

  14. Lowetide says:

    jonrmcleod:
    Lowetide,

    Rex is in the midst of a bigger project the year. I volunteered to review a couple of games for him. I keep telling him that his eventual expose will usher in the age of the robot refs.

    Caleb Jones is so happy with being named No. 7 prospect he has two assists tonight.

  15. GMB3 says:

    Lowetide: They will all be called Mcgoo.

    Mick McGeough once got things thrown at him by Oilers fans as he left the ice right? Or am I misremembering this whole event?

  16. GMB3 says:

    I believe MacT once also used the “R” word post game to describe him?

  17. Lowetide says:

    Haha, Caleb Jones with a goal, now 1-2-3 on the night and 21, 3-15-18 on the season.

  18. JDï™ says:

    Lowetide: They will all be called Mcgoo.

    Multiple overhead cameras on a thin wire, programed to follow the sensor location data from the players’ tracking chips.

  19. Frank the dog says:

    ashley: I realize this is frustrating, but it is not unique from an historical perspective.Losing teams don’t get the benefit of the doubt like winning teams do.Ask LT about the Habs of the 70’s.

    Chirpy losing teams get it even worse.

    There is some respect from the officials which is earned by teams who are consistently winning and by players who consistently perform at a high level, entirely on a subconscious level.The refs think they are impartial and calling it fair.After all, why would they go out and purposely do a bad job?But they can’t control the subtle favour to the perennial success story, or disfavour for the perennial loser.It’s human nature.

    The beauty of it is that we don’t have to use spreadsheets and stats to work ourselves up into a rage.Instead, all we have to do is win, and the problem is fixed.

    Okee dokee I’ll let it go then. There’s better hills than this to die on.

  20. hags9k says:

    McDavid tops in scoring, I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free fan can feel, a free fan at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope we can make it to the playoffs. I hope to see the Pisani emerge and shake his hand. I hope the balance photo is as beautiful as it has been in my dreams. I hope….

  21. VOR says:

    For those people who think refs are bias (and I am one of them) I strongly urge you to read (it is available for free online) Michael J. Lopez and Kevin Snyder’s brilliant paper, “Biased Impartiality Among National Hockey League Referees” from International Journal of Sport Finance, 2013, 8 208-223. It gives a pretty good summary of the state of the art of thinking about referee bias before moving on to discuss whether make up calls are a real thing or not. I don’t want to steal all their thunder but here are a few highlights:

    Teams that get the most penalties in the first period win a disproportionate number of games.
    Teams that get the most penalties in the first period get fewer in the second and third period.
    Teams with the most penalties entering the third period can do no wrong.
    These effects are more pronounced in the playoffs than the regular season.
    Make up calls are a near certainty in sudden death overtime.
    In both regular season and post season the home team benefits more from makeup calls than the visiting team.
    There is no difference in effect when only the top six are considered.
    The larger the size of the audience, the more people watching, the stronger the effect.

    In other words they found no evidence of individual team bias but compelling evidence for trying to balance the number of calls.

    I will leave you all to read for yourselves about score effects but I am betting you can figure out what Snyder and Lopez found.

  22. JDï™ says:

    Zibanejad doing in his ankle, going into the end boards:

    https://streamable.com/haao

    Squeam alert.

  23. Lowetide says:

    hags9k:
    McDavid tops in scoring, I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free fan can feel, a free fan at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope we can make it to the playoffs.I hope to see the Pisani emerge and shake his hand. I hope the balance photo is as beautiful as it has been in my dreams. I hope….

    I knew what this was in the first sentence and I still loved it!

  24. tcho says:

    Squeam alert.

    Squeam alert is right. Oiy. I can’t unsee that.

  25. VOR says:

    The preponderance of the research has found that it isn’t winning or losing records that influence officials. It is whether the team is playing at home or on the road, how big and loud the crowd is, and which team is considered the more disciplined.

    Additionally, Kerry Frazer had it exactly right when he said Referees hate chronic complainers. The research clearly shows players complaining about the officiating makes things worse not better. There is some evidence losing teams whine more but if they can learn to keep their grievances to themselves and play reasonably clean hockey it vanishes as factor. By the way the research shows very clearly that Referees penalize visiting teams for ticky tacky penalties but both teams for clear rule infractions like too many men.

    So coaches should tell their players to keep their yaps shut and their sticks on the ice particularly on the road.

  26. Bank Shot says:

    On Pitlick becoming the new Pisani. I can’t see it. Pisani had a couple of strong seasons in the AHL. Pitlick has never hit ten goals in an AHL season. I feel like Pitlick’s long term prognosis is 4th liner if he stays in the big league.

    Lets hope he succeeds all expectations.

    On Caleb Jones. I think he might be the best prospect out of Benning, Bear, and Paigin. I probably would have had him 4th if I was making the list.

  27. VOR says:

    A slight correction. In my first post I should have said top six teams. They also looked at original six teams and found no difference with or without them in the statistics. So neither a winning record or a long history and big market have any impact on the impartiality bias. Refs just want to keep the game close, and maintain the appearance of impartiality.

    Given all the research that shows this effect I am doubtful there is a specific bias against the Oilers, if there is it will be well hidden behind a mask of impartiality. Also NHL Referees call far fewer penalties than officials in other sports so while the odds of scoring are much higher when you are on a power play than playing at even strength NHL officials actually have a smaller game impact, according to some researchers, than say an NBA official.

  28. JDï™ says:

    tcho,

    I guess it’s actually his fibula. Up to 8 weeks.

    There have been some bad injuries lately.

    looks around… whistles

  29. Professor Q says:

    JDï™:
    Zibanejad doing in his ankle, going into the end boards:

    https://streamable.com/haao

    Squeam alert.

    “Achilles Wept”

  30. Side says:

    Pretty sure Pisani gets mentioned more on this blog than any other Oiler in the history of the Oilers.

    What I don’t understand is that in order to be a “Pisani” you need to meet very specific criteria, to the point where the player almost needs to have the same blood type, hair colour and eye colour as Pisani to be a Pisani type.

    Now, another “Pisani” criteria must be met – that someone is not likely to be “Pisani” unless they get over 10 goals in the AHL.

    Is it just me, or did Pisani have a couple of good years and the rest were meh. If we’re just referring to a player type, surely there is a better label for it?

    Does every other NHL team have a Pisani type? Or are we just looking for Big Foot, or just a straight up clone of Pisani, but younger?

  31. Lowetide says:

    Side:
    Pretty sure Pisani gets mentioned more on this blog than any other Oiler in the history of the Oilers.

    What I don’t understand is that in order to be a “Pisani” you need to meet very specific criteria, to the point where the player almost needs to have the same blood type, hair colour and eye colour as Pisani to be a Pisani type.

    Now, another “Pisani” criteria must be met – that someone is not likely to be “Pisani” unless they get over 10 goals in the AHL.

    Is it just me, or did Pisani have a couple of good years and the rest were meh.If we’re just referring to a player type, surely there is a better label for it?

    Does every other NHL team have a Pisani type? Or are we just looking for Big Foot, or just a straight up clone of Pisani, but younger?

    I have no doubt Pisani gets mentioned on this blog more than any other blog. I define a Pisani as someone who can score 15 goals a season, stay on the right side of the puck, mark his man, and when required mentor one or more linemates. Pisani began filling those requirements as a rookie and continued to do it until health impacted his life in a big way. You may enjoy reading this

    http://lowetide.ca/2009/08/07/re-09-10-fernando-pisani/

  32. Glass says:

    Side,

    I feel the exact same way, the ’10 goals in AHL’ seems irrelevant. Pitlick is doing pretty damn good and I’d love to see him with Caggiula regularly. I think Khaira would suit that line extremely well, but I can’t see him getting a call up in a while.

  33. JDï™ says:

    Member Krueger’s 2-1-2 PP? Two forwards below the icing line?

    Might be a hole nuther ting if one of those players is 97.

  34. frjohnk says:

    Lowetide: I have no doubt Pisani gets mentioned on this blog more than any other blog. I define a Pisani as someone who can score 15 goals a season, stay on the right side of the puck, mark his man, and when required mentor one or more linemates. Pisani began filling those requirements as a rookie and continued to do it until health impacted his life in a big way. You may enjoy reading this

    http://lowetide.ca/2009/08/07/re-09-10-fernando-pisani/

    That OT goal in 06 made me a fan of his forever.

  35. Side says:

    Lowetide: I have no doubt Pisani gets mentioned on this blog more than any other blog. I define a Pisani as someone who can score 15 goals a season, stay on the right side of the puck, mark his man, and when required mentor one or more linemates. Pisani began filling those requirements as a rookie and continued to do it until health impacted his life in a big way. You may enjoy reading this

    http://lowetide.ca/2009/08/07/re-09-10-fernando-pisani/

    Thanks, LT!

  36. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Lowetide: I have no doubt Pisani gets mentioned on this blog more than any other blog. I define a Pisani as someone who can score 15 goals a season, stay on the right side of the puck, mark his man, and when required mentor one or more linemates. Pisani began filling those requirements as a rookie and continued to do it until health impacted his life in a big way. You may enjoy reading this

    http://lowetide.ca/2009/08/07/re-09-10-fernando-pisani/

    he’s never scored 15, but Mark Letestu has seasons of 10, 11, 12, 13, & 14 goals. He scored 13 in the lockout shortened campaign. He’s no longer a rookie but meets the other requirements of a Pisani.

  37. Lowetide says:

    Bruce McCurdy: he’s never scored 15, but Mark Letestu has seasons of 10, 11, 12, 13, & 14 goals. He scored 13 in the lockout shortened campaign. He’s no longer a rookie but meets the other requirements of a Pisani.

    Agreed, and Pouliot meets many of them as well.

  38. Bank Shot says:

    Glass:
    Side,

    I feel the exact same way, the ’10 goals in AHL’ seems irrelevant. Pitlick is doing pretty damn good and I’d love to see him with Caggiula regularly. I think Khaira would suit that line extremely well, but I can’t see him getting a call up in a while.

    It’s only relevant if you are trying to figure out if Pitlick’s performance is sustainable.

    Pitlick has zero history of producing, and now he’s scoring at a 20+ goal pace in the NHL. Maybe he keeps it up all year, Chiarelli signs his for another 2 years at $2 million per season, and then Pitlick never scores half as many points again.

    This is called the Lance Bouma contract. GMs need to avoid these.

  39. GMB3 says:

    Bank Shot: It’s only relevant if you are trying to figure out if Pitlick’s performance is sustainable.

    Pitlick has zero history of producing, and now he’s scoring at a 20+ goal pace in the NHL. Maybe he keeps it up all year, Chiarelli signs his for another 2 years at $2 million per season, and then Pitlick never scores half as many points again.

    This is called the Lance Bouma contract. GMs need to avoid these.

    Didn’t Pitlick have significantly better offensive numbers than Bouma in the dub? Better skater as well, to my eye.

  40. jfry says:

    different style of games, but similar influence on linemates and given some responsibility as a mentor who plays up and down the order –19 doesn’t really PK. what about maroon as the pisani? everyone seems to enjoy a boost from him.

  41. jfry says:

    also, really looking forward to the nick ellis article. feels like he’s really emerging. interesting, situation emerging in the A if he continues he continues to outplay LB

  42. Bank Shot says:

    GMB3: Didn’t Pitlick have significantly better offensive numbers than Bouma in the dub? Better skater as well, to my eye.

    Sure outscored him in juniors, although Pitlick’s numbers weren’t super strong for an NHL prospect either.

    Bouma and Pitlick had about the same scoring rate their first two years in the AHL.

    I’m not trying to bring Pitlick down, but it doesn’t look like this is his actual level of ability. His on ice shooting percentage is 13.51%. That’s never going to last.

    Remember when Lander had 20 points in 38 games? Sometimes guys just go on a tear. I don’t really expect Pitlick to cement himself as a third liner going forward. If he makes it as a 4th liner, that’d be great. I don’t think he ever fills the role of dependable 3rd liner who can kill penalties and move up to the second line from time to time, as that is what Pisani was.

  43. Glass says:

    Bank Shot,

    That’s a fair point. I suppose by watching Pitlick he just seems to get it. He plays hard, he’s scoring on whichever line you put him on, and in a variety of ways.

  44. sliderule says:

    Canadian Mackenzie Hughes rolls in a long putt to win for first time on PGA tour

  45. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Bank Shot: It’s only relevant if you are trying to figure out if Pitlick’s performance is sustainable.

    Pitlick has zero history of producing, and now he’s scoring at a 20+ goal pace in the NHL. Maybe he keeps it up all year, Chiarelli signs his for another 2 years at $2 million per season, and then Pitlick never scores half as many points again.

    This is called the Lance Bouma contract. GMs need to avoid these.

    I thought it was called the Gilbert Brulé contract?

  46. russ99 says:

    IMO our lack of wingers in the system is due to two factors:

    AHL veterans getting key icetime ahead of prospects and we’re now paying for the coke machine drafts/trades of the past.

    Kale Kessy?

  47. Ryan says:

    russ99:
    IMO our lack of wingers in the system is due to two factors:

    AHL veterans getting key icetime ahead of prospects and we’re now paying for the coke machine drafts/trades of the past.

    Kale Kessy?

    How about the Reinhart trade?

  48. jp says:

    Bank Shot: Sure outscored him in juniors, although Pitlick’s numbers weren’t super strong for an NHL prospect either.

    Bouma and Pitlick had about the same scoring rate their first two years in the AHL.

    I’m not trying to bring Pitlick down, but it doesn’t look like this is his actual level of ability. His on ice shooting percentage is 13.51%. That’s never going to last.

    Remember when Lander had 20 points in 38 games? Sometimes guys just go on a tear. I don’t really expect Pitlick to cement himself as a third liner going forward. If he makes it as a 4th liner, that’d be great. I don’t think he ever fills the role of dependable 3rd liner who can kill penalties and move up to the second line from time to time, as that is what Pisani was.

    I agree completely on Pitlick. He’s got a chance to be a real solid 4th liner if he can stay healthy. But it’s unlikely he can consistently score 15+ goals and hold down a 3rd line role.

  49. Pouzar says:

    sliderule:
    Canadian Mackenzie Hughes rolls in a long putt to win for first time on PGA tour

    I watched the chunky chip on the 3rd playoff hole this AM before leaving for work. Pissed off I turned the TV off thinking someone is making par and he is done. Get in to work, check golfchannel.com and BOOM!!!

    Huge win for CDN golf. Invite to Masters. I couldn’t be more stoked for the kid.

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