Someday never comes

The Edmonton Oilers are in the “we don’t need no stinking favors” portion of their schedule. The New York Rangers shot their captain out of a cannon, have hobbled many of their forwards and started a goalie—born in Upper Yemen—with about 10 minutes NHL experience, but the Oilers threw it back. Don’t you dare try giving this team two points, they don’t need your pity.

  • Todd McLellan: “We can wave the magic wand, we can pound on the desk, we can do all we want. They (his players) have to accept some individual responsibility to be ready to play. There’s not enough of them right now. Tonight’s start was unacceptable.”

THE ATHLETIC!

Great offer! Includes a free 7-day trial so you can try The Athletic on for size free and see if they enjoy the in-depth, ad-free coverage on the site. If you don’t feel it’s worth the $4.49/month, cancel anytime during trial before getting charged. Offer is here.

WIMOWEH, YEAR OVER YEAR

  • March 2016: 2-0-0, goal differential +5 (4 points)
  • March 2017: 2-0-0, goal differential +4 (4 points)
  • March 2018: 0-2-0, goal differential -3 (0 points)

The Rangers sent out defensemen with names like Pionk, O’Gara, Quackenbush, Humperdinck and Norbert, but it was to no avail. Edmonton was bound and determined to send those two points away and they did it. Expect a better performance in the next game but this one was over as soon as the teams hit the ice. The Edmonton Oilers, a team that posted 103 points a year ago, is no longer a team. We are watching individuals who don’t realize they are playing in the final NHL games of their career. I wonder if Robert Nilsson knew it in real time and wonder about these young men, too.

AFTER 65, YEAR OVER YEAR

  • Oilers 15-16: 24-34-7, goal differential -44 (55 points)
  • Oilers 16-17: 35-22-8, goal differential +18 (78 points)
  • Oilers 17-18: 27-34-4, goal differential -35 (58 points)

I’ve mentioned this before but that 2015-16 season has been sticking like glue to this one. There have been chances for this year’s model to gain clearance but someday never comes. McDavid is leading like a lion and Nuge was a welcome sight. The auditioning wingers didn’t place a bullet point on the resume last night, not that I could see.

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM MARCH

  • At home to: Nashville, NY Rangers, Arizona, NY Islanders, Minnesota (Expected 2-3-0) (Actual 0-2-0)
  • On the road to: Calgary (Expected 0-1-0) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • At home to: San Jose (Expected 0-0-1) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • On the road to: Florida, Tampa Bay, Carolina, Ottawa (Expected 1-2-1) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • At home to: Los Angeles, Anaheim, Columbus (Expected 2-1-0) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • On the road to: Vancouver, Calgary (Expected 1-0-1) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • Overall expected result: 6-7-3, 15 points in 16 games
  • Current results: 0-2-0, 0 points in two games

Edmonton has another good opportunity for a win tomorrow night and this club often performs well on the back of a subpar performance. This month has some potential to be explosive (the two Calgary games will be massive for fans) and of course Connor McDavid is on pace for 100 points.

DEFENSE, LAST NIGHT

  • Sekera-Benning were 9-5 in 10:30 together, Sekera went 3-4 with Ethan Bear and 3-0 with Kris Russell. Benning went 2-10 with Klefbom, that was not a happening pair. I thought Sekera had an improved night compared to his own recent performances, Benning straighted out once he was taken from the Klefbom pairing.
  • Nurse-Russell went 16-13 in 12:55, 1-1 GF, most of the good coming from time with 97 (13-7). Nurse had a nice chance to score late, for me his defensive work was very good on a night of chaos from the blue. Speaking of, Russell’s shift on the first goal against was baffling. If you watch the tape again, and have an explanation for it, please share. Seriously.
  • Klefbom-Bear were 14-9, 0-1 GF in 9:07 together. Pairing had eight offensive zone faceoffs, one of the few identifiable ploys by coach Todd McLellan in the game. I was impressed with Bear, who showed good speed, offensive instincts and a solid shot. Klefbom had a miserable game, I’m a fan of his work but last night lends credence to the idea of shutting him down.
  • Cam Talbot stopped 31 of 34, .912. He had no chance on the first goal, the second on was a PP (puck over glass by the goalie) and the final one came on a deflection (appeared to be a bit soft but your mileage may vary). I’ll say Talbot wasn’t the reason for the loss but he didn’t steal one, either. Then again, who would have thought he’d have to?
  • NaturalStatTrick and NHL.com.

FORWARDS, LAST NIGHT

  • Lucic-McDavid-Draisaitl went 24-12, 1-1 GF and 5-2 HDSC. McDavid was pure fire, could have had some extra points, but credit to the Rangers they did some good work against him. Edmonton rarely had a tie let alone the lead, and that aided things. Kreider-Zibanejad-Buchnevich lost the Corsi battle 14-8 and were 0-1 GF but I think most teams will take that against McDavid’s line these days. Leon had three giveaways. Too many.
  • Puljujarvi-Strome-Slepyshev went 14-14, 0-1 GF and 1-6 in HDSC. Went 6-5 against Fast-Spooner-Hayes but the 10-bell chances were 3-2 for the other guys. Strome had two kids with him, I get it, but he’s going to be looking for a raise this summer and needs the results to match. He wasn’t facing Everest last night, should have moved the needle to my eye. Part of the problem? Puljujarvi. He’s not lacking confidence but has the look of a man without a plan with the puck on his stick. Patience, a little patience, mm yeah, mm yeah.
  • Cammalleri-Nuge-Aberg went 9-11, Nuge scored a goal on a delayed penalty but the line itself was not dynamic (7-4 in shots, 0-1 in HDSC). Love the Nuge, wouldn’t mind seeing him with new linemates on Monday. Cammalleri does more good than a lot of these youngsters, that should be a concern to these youngsters.
  • Pakarinen-Khaira-Kassian were 4-12 in 7:31 and didn’t have a lot going on. Kassian took a dubious early penalty, Khaira had the puck on his stick to no avail but couldn’t make anything rhyme, I like his game without the puck and that side of the equation probably gets him an increased role next season. Pakarinen was the most noticeable player on the line, due to hitting.

OILERS SUMMER

Bob Nicholson had a conversation with the HNIC folks last night, setting twitter on fire. I give him credit for stepping in on a night (and after a first period) when things were going very badly. I’m reading a lot of conclusions being drawn from his comments but would remind you it isn’t his place to reveal all in March. Reading the tea leaves, I think it’s fair to suggest we’ll see some change after the season. I have expressed my opinion on the matter, and will drill down on the Nicholson comments, but the idea that Nicholson gave us the road map yesterday is wildly speculative and flies in the face of logic and reason.

The Oilers won’t stand pat because they can’t stand pat. Last night wasn’t the time nor the place. If you’re wondering when the reckoning, Edmonton’s final game is Saturday, April 7. I think it’s reasonable to expect a media avail in the days that follow.

 

written by

The author didn‘t add any Information to his profile yet.
Related Posts

261 Responses to "Someday never comes"

« Older Comments
  1. ArmchairGM says:

    dustrock:

    Letestu’s comments when he was traded sure made it sound like this is a team that didn’t realize teams would be coming hard for them this season.

    Respect. You earn it and then you have to earn it even more.

    The number of backup goalies this team has faced shows just how hard other teams have been coming for them.

  2. Andy Dufresne says:

    ArmchairGM: The number of backup goalies this team has faced shows just how hard other teams have been coming for them.

    have you noticed how these backup goalies look like Vezina candidates when the play us? They are stopping 35 40 45 shots. They, and everyone else elevates their game when the play against the worlds best player. Its one of the things that makes the accomplisments of the McDavids and Gretzkys and Lemiuxs and Crosbys of the world all that more amazing.

  3. Bryan says:

    The greatest tragedy for me in the midst of another lost season that has fans tuning out and ignoring much of what happens on the ice is the underappreciation of what 97 is doing. To say he is a generational player doesn’t do him justice. In my personal ranking of all time great players I have always reserved a special place for Bobby Orr, even though I was far from being a Bruins fan. I was a rabid Oilers follower during the glory years and loved every minute of watching Wayne Gretzky, but to me he was a one of a kind point producer more than an all round hockey player. Scoring more goals than the other guy is of course the ultimate objective of the game and it is not easy to compare across eras but my admittedly simplistic method is to compare how five of player x would do playing against five of player y. Using this unscientific parameter I always felt that five Bobby’s would have their way with five Wayne’s though it would definitely be an interesting contest. The other player that I felt could push the limits of Orr was Gordie Howe, though I never got to see him in his prime. From watching game film it is obvious that he was an absolute horse and almost impossible to contain. I think five Gordies would give five Bobby’s a terrific test but Orr would pull it out in the seventh game, likely in overtime. I never really expected to see anyone else who would approach that rarified air although there have been many many excellent players. Watching Connor has made me reconsider everything. Game after game he makes plays that are absolutely jaw dropping with their speed and creativity. I am completely done with the management and coaching of this team but I continue to watch, simply to see what McDavid will do next. It is unfortunate that the losing pushes him to try to do too much himself at times but his frustration is very understandable. I know I would be first in line to see five Connors go up against five Bobby’s but wouldn’t want to put too much money down on either side in that one.

  4. Lowetide says:

    Oilers sign Colin Larkin, Dylan’s brother, as per Mark Divver

    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=220012

  5. Andy Dufresne says:

    Bryan:
    The greatest tragedy for me in the midst of another lost season that has fans tuning out and ignoring much of what happens on the ice is the underappreciation of what 97 is doing.To say he is a generational player doesn’t do him justice.In my personal ranking of all time great players I have always reserved a special place for Bobby Orr, even though I was far from being a Bruins fan.I was a rabid Oilers follower during the glory years and loved every minute of watching Wayne Gretzky, but to me he was a one of a kind point producer more than an all round hockey player.Scoring more goals than the other guy is of course the ultimate objective of the game and it is not easy to compare across eras but my admittedly simplistic method is to compare how five of player x would do playing against five of player y.Using this unscientific parameter I always felt that five Bobby’s would have their way with five Wayne’s though it would definitely be an interesting contest.The other player that I felt could push the limits of Orr was Gordie Howe, though I never got to see him in his prime.From watching game filmit is obvious that he was an absolute horse and almost impossible to contain.I think five Gordies would give five Bobby’s a terrific test but Orr would pull it out in the seventh game, likely in overtime.I never really expected to see anyone else who would approach that rarified air although there have been many many excellent players.Watching Connor has made me reconsider everything.Game after game he makes plays that are absolutely jaw dropping with their speed and creativity.I am completely done with the management and coaching of this team but I continue to watch, simply to see what McDavid will do next.It is unfortunate that the losing pushes him to try to do too much himself at times but his frustration is very understandable.I know I would be first in line to see five Connors go upagainst five Bobby’s but wouldn’t want to put too much money down on either side in that one.

    Ill give you 10 to 1 odds and ill take the five Conners. Bobby is so old and has bad knees.

  6. Doug McLachlan says:

    Ok so if Chicago let’s go of Quenneville we jump on him. Chicago getting hammered today by the Ducks so he may be the one who pays the price. Maybe we grease the skids and ask Mike Kitchen to join the Assistant Coaching staff before the season ends, don’t think he is currently working.

    If McClellan is let go, not thrilled about needing to do it but a blood sacrifice is necessary, Who other than Coach Q?

    BTW yesterday I was trying to find an solution to the Lucic deal and someone, can’t recall who, said that a buyout candidate had to be on the roster in the previous season to be bought out in the summer.

    Checked paragraph 50.9(i) of the CBA and paragraph 13 of the. SPC and didn’t see anything suggesting that was the case. Any suggestion of where to find that rule would be appreciated. You can tweet at me @DougHMcLachlan

  7. Alpine says:

    Larkin plays in NCAA Div III. Have any players ever come out of Div III?

  8. Andy Dufresne says:

    Lowetide:
    Oilers sign Colin Larkin, Dylan’s brother, as per Mark Divver

    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=220012

    Colin Larkin (born 1949) is a British entrepreneur. The compiler of the most extensive database of popular music in Europe and the US.

    Bummer….I liked the DJ at Rogers Place.

  9. Wilde says:

    As a rule, the top European skaters via NHL central scouting go in random spots when the draft actually plays out.

    For example, Ostap Safin was the 14th European skater on the list and we got him at #115.

    Ondrej Kase was 8th, went #205(7th round!!) and is now a per 60 demon on a value contract in the NHL after two years in the AHL. In fact, we’re looking for Ondrej Kase here. Was 14p in 25GP in the AHL at 19, that’s better than a lot of our 22-25 year olds.

    Here’s a list of guys I’d target, if they’re remaining, starting at the 3rd round, which is projected, for Edmonton, to be about #70:

    Filip Hallander : 20pts in 29GP on the same team Olofsson’s on. Dreaming here, but if he’s there take him, take him, take him. The Kase, Not a 1999er that we’re looking for to step into the AHL immediately, but will do so based on talent anyways.

    Jakub Lauko: 7pts in 41GP in Czech elite. The only under 20 year old his team even plays.

    Krystof Hrabik: 6’4″ 1999er, plays men. Fits the criteria perfectly.

    Niklas Nordgren: 3 pts in 15 games in SM-Liiga, destroys his peers in league-play and most recently he 5 nations tournament.

    David Gustafsson: Disappointing 5 nations appearance may drop him into range.

    Daniel Kurovsky: 1998er! Could get him any time, I think. A big winger who could be drafted in the 7th round and play in the AHL instantly. 11 in 42 in limited minutes against men.

    Jerry Turkulainen: another 1998er, except tiny. Puts up big numbers in Sm-Liiga. 26 in 48 as an 18 year old.

  10. rickithebear says:

    Tmac,s shift from protecting the HD area at all cost to running
    An Ozone version of Eakins D zone press still leaves one dman covering t2 opposition forwards.
    Leaving Talbot repeatedly out to dry.

    In what world is abandoning the HD area any form of good coaching.

    Any who support Tmac have been left behind.

    See VGK copying my cup core structure.

    1. The best HD coach available
    2. Them recognizing Fluery had gone from #17 HD goalie to top 10
    3. Picked the 9 top 70 HD dmen available.
    4. Picked the 5 top 125 forwards available.
    5. Took the prospects with /60 numbers that suggested top 125 forwards with increased TOI
    6. Took the best pK fwds and D available.

    I told guys at work that there was a strong possibility of cup contender.

    Oilers last year
    1. Tmac ran a HD system
    2. Talbot Top 3 hd goalie
    3. Top 15 HD Dmen Larson, Sekera, Russel best 0% chance d paired with Sekera
    4 top 8 team in 125 fwd depth
    McDavid, Draisatl, Lucic, RNH, Eberle, Maroon
    5. +ve goal dif special teams.

    This year we are missing
    1. HD system coach We’re Waldo system has taken us from great HD to brutal GA defence.
    4. Top 8 125 fwd group
    Missing, eberle, Lucic and Maroon,s Goals
    5. God awful special teams under coaches.

    We went from having to outscore 1-3ga to 3-4ga

  11. Andy Dufresne says:

    Lowetide:
    Oilers sign Colin Larkin, Dylan’s brother, as per Mark Divver

    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=220012

    Rebuild is underway!

    In Bakersfield.

  12. fifthcartel says:

    Signing a Div III college player feels like the biggest waste of a contract spot.

  13. ArmchairGM says:

    Andy Dufresne: have you noticed how these backup goalies look like Vezina candidates when the play us? They are stopping 35 40 45 shots. They, and everyone else elevates their game when the play against the worlds best player. Its one of the things that makes the accomplisments of the McDavids and Gretzkys and Lemiuxs and Crosbys of the world all that more amazing.

    Opposing coaches wouldn’t even consider playing the backup against Tampa or Pittsburgh. The fact that they’re free to do so when playing the Oilers is a tell, IMO.

  14. Gayfish says:

    Another case of us thinking we got the brother?

  15. rickithebear says:

    My Ufa targets are wingers
    Maroon
    Grabner

    People complain about Puljujarvi,s progress
    Even points:
    Tkachuk draft +1 (19yr)
    76gm 10evg (..132 evgpg) 35evp (.461 evppg)
    Puljujarvi draft +2 (19yr)
    48gm 9evg (.188 evgpg) 16 evg (.333 evppg)

    Tkachuk draft +2 (20yr)
    64gm 14evg (.219 evgpg) 32evp (.500 evppg)
    Puljujarvi draft +3 (20yr)
    ???????????????.

    Centres
    McDavid
    Draisatl
    Strome
    Khaira

    RW
    RNH
    Puljujarvi
    Aberg
    Kassian

    LW
    No clue of the depth structure
    Available
    Lucic
    Slepyshev
    Yamamoto

    The only dmen I have some level of trust
    Larson
    Sekera
    Russel
    Benning
    Ohvitu

    Goalie
    Talbot

  16. ArmchairGM says:

    Lowetide:
    Oilers sign Colin Larkin, Dylan’s brother, as per Mark Divver

    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=220012

    I hope that’s an AHL contract. A 24-year-old div III player has virtually zero chance of making it to the Bigs.

  17. StixMalone says:

    Andy Dufresne: Rebuild is underway!

    In Bakersfield.

    I guess we have a 10 year plan. Doesn’t help us next year……

  18. Bryan says:

    Andy Dufresne,

    Yeah he might need to hit the gym for a while.👍

  19. VOR says:

    Andy Dufresne: Good Post. Thank you.

    Question for you.If the coach does all the things you say he should do above, and it dosent work, How do you know if the coach is just bad at it, or that the players are just not good enough?

    Point A combined with Point B would suggest you just need to shut it down or blow it up. Yes/No?

    Great questions.

    I want to start by saying a lot of research has done exploring coaching fit. It doesn’t really matter what psychological or communication model you use for exploring coaching fit the same truth leaps out. Coaches and athletes achieve more and get better results when they think about and experience the world in similar ways and talk about those thoughts and experiences in the same language.

    In other words a coach can do all the meta and micro tasks flawlessly and get horrible results because of poor fit. Neither the athletes or coaches have done anything wrong. A new coach is likely to get a better outcome if they are a better fit even if they aren’t as good coaches but in any case no need to burn it all down.

    Then younger, less experienced coaches, tend to have better explicit understanding of the job and more and better formal training but execute the key tasks at reduced levels of expertise. I don’t know if you have been reading Georges posts about coaches but if like Georges I thought the Oilers had some reasonable chance to win a Cup in the next several years I’d be screaming for a veteran coach with Stanley Cups on their resume. I don’t think the cap is going to allow a deep enough balanced enough roster to be a Cup contender for at least three years so I want a young coach who can grow into the job.

    So if the Oilers had a younger, less experienced coach I’d say we might give them some slack while they develop mastery of key micro and macro tasks. Again no need to blow it up. TMac is a veteran coach and he rightly gets no slack.

    As to how we’d know if they were trying to do it right. Well we’d get a good idea from their press conferences. Todd Nelson used to openly talk about many of the tasks and how he thought he was doing. That tells you what the coach was trying to do. On ice performance gives us glimpses into how well the coach is executing these tasks. You could see the progress with Nelson.

    TMac does the same thing. The difference is he self reports failure and we see that failure on the ice. But is the problem that he hasn’t developed mastery of the tasks or that the players are struggling with their end of the coach athlete contract. In other words are we looking at a tear down or a renovation?

    I think there is a fit issue. TMac seems to be able to get outstanding performances intermittently or regularly from the teams top players. That is a huge plus. But even last year he had players who were clearly tuning him out. The number of tuned out players seems to have risen. Any one disagree?

    As for tear down or renovation I have been clear I’d make very minor personnel changes. I still think that but last night they clearly as LT pointed out weren’t a team. If that keeps up with each game it will be harder and harder to attract a great coach of any age or experience.

    We are no longer in the land of tire fires. Nope, we are talking full on nuclear winter. Hockey teams are never supposed to break down into a collection of individuals. Never. No coach will touch that without bringing in a bunch of players they know and trust. Which means massive roster turn over.

    I hope that answered your questions. To summarize. We know what a coach is trying to do through their own words. We know how well that is working by on ice performance. We know if a veteran coach is doing a bad job of the key tasks by how a team fails.

    Collapsing, wilting in bad times is poor execution of a fundamental (actually several fundamental) meta tasks by the coach. However, giving a shit and playing for each other are things NHL players should have mastered in Atom. They aren’t on the current coach. Here we have both sorts of failure happening at the same time.

    This is why I don’t think a coaching change is going to be enough.

  20. OmJo says:

    Georges: You’re right. It’s important to walk a mile in another man’s shoes. In this case, that mile could possibly be managed by walking from one end of Katz’s LA mansion to the other end. It’s apparently the most expensive property in the city,At the end of that walk, I let out a sigh and wonder how I can possibly come up with that $10M. Then I have a thought. Tired of walking, I get on the hoverboard and float into the Amazon rain forest I had installed in the back yard. I find the grove of magical money trees. My special place. I float up and pluck 10 $1M apples. And my problems are solved.

    Damn it feels good to be a gangsta

    This post was awesome.

  21. Gerta Rauss says:

    Doug McLachlan: BTW yesterday I was trying to find an solution to the Lucic deal and someone, can’t recall who, said that a buyout candidate had to be on the roster in the previous season to be bought out in the summer.

    Checked paragraph 50.9(i) of the CBA and paragraph 13 of the. SPC and didn’t see anything suggesting that was the case. Any suggestion of where to find that rule would be appreciated. You can tweet at me @DougHMcLachlan

    I don’t believe there is such a requirement-I can’t find anything to prove it but it’s difficult to find something that isn’t there(I don’t believe it is, anyway)

    The only evidence I can provide is the Oilers twice were involved in transactions
    that would have disproved this assumption, but neither transaction was consummated, so I can’t
    really point to these transactions as direct evidence.

    The LA Kings attempted to trade for Gilbert Brule in 2011 (the Ryan Smith trade) with the intention of buying out the remainder of Brule’s contract. The deal fell apart due to Brule’s health, and the 2 teams eventually agreed to Colin Fraser being the player moved in the transaction. Fraser played and won a Stanley the following year, so no buyout was involved

    In 2014, the Oilers moved Sam Gagner to Tampa, and it was rumored that Tampa was going to buyout the remaining 2 years on the contract (it was cheaper than buying out the 2 years of Teddy Purcell) Arizona stepped in and traded for Gagner instead,so again, no buyout was involved.

    Both the above scenarios involve hearsay and conjecture, and those are kinds of evidence

    I’m sure an NHL player has been traded and then bought out in the same summer, I just can’t think of anyone at the moment

  22. Wilde says:

    ArmchairGM,

    You know what our AHL team really needed? Another Patrick Russell.

  23. Gerta Rauss says:

    Matty’s latest in up at the Journal-out of respect for our hosts wishes I won’t post the link but the quote that caught my eye was a comment from Klefbom regarding his shoulder and NOT requiring surgery this spring/summer, but he would NOT be playing in the world championships if Sweden asks him to participate

  24. JimmyV1965 says:

    VOR:
    I can’t help myself. We have reached a teachable moment.

    Someone asked what do coaches do? I am going to provide a partial answer to that question based on more than 4 decades of hard earned experience.

    I will not be talking here about technical coaching. Coaching has many technical aspects that are often unique to the sport. These are called the micro tasks of coaching and they are vital to coaching success.

    However, they are called micro-tasks to differentiate them from the meta tasks that are common to coaching all sports. Meta tasks also tend to be foundational. You have to build them into every thing you do.

    Bob Johnson was fond of saying that he started by making sure every player he coached knew that Bob wanted him to succeed and he’d try everything he could think of to help them succeed but they had to take responsibility for their own effort and involvement. In psychological terms he started by establishing the process of continuous autonomy support. Providing autonomy support is about helping the athlete develop self-determined motivation. It is the first meta-task.

    You want the athletes you coach to have self-determined motivation because it is strongly correlated with improved and maximal human performance. If you motivate them yourself instead of supporting their development of autonomy and self-determination they will be psychologically fragile, one bad call, one bad goal and they will wilt. It sure looks like the Oilers have not developed the needed level of self-determination.

    Another key meta task is leadership transference. This one is a bit trickier. You want to model the behaviour you want to pass on. As an example let’s take self-management. As a coach you want to be human but a very disciplined and calm human. You want to be prepared but flexible. You want to be funny but serious. You want to look after yourself but sacrifice for others. And you want to be balanced in all these things.

    The thing I loved about Bob was he was that he perfectly modelled the extraordinary traits he wanted his athletes to possess. But he also was warm, funny, and joyful. He knew what he was doing but his own motivation was never to make better hockey players. It was to make better humans. If you know any of the hundreds and hundreds of athletes Bob Johnson coached you know they all react the same when you bring up his name.

    First they shake their heads, then they shed a tear, then they tell you a funny Badger Bob story. Then they pause. After they get control of themselves they say, “He changed my life. Forever. For the better. He made me the person I am today.”

    That is leadership transference.

    You want every athlete to be their own leader. In team sports you want each athlete to be capable of leading others. You want a team of leaders. This starts as I said with leading yourself.

    I could go on through the other eight key meta tasks but I want to make sure I am clear.

    To be a great coach you’ve got to have mastery of the critical micro-tasks. These are unique to each sport. I coach athletes from many sports and am certified to coach in quite a number of those sports (you can’t work with carded athletes and get paid if you aren’t certified). I can assure you the day to day work life of a soccer coach and of a swim coach look nothing alike.

    I am not certified in hockey coaching and have never coached the sport. I am in no way qualified to comment on what they do day to day. I am however really well versed in the meta-tasks of coaching and stand by my positions that

    A) the coaching staff should be terminated because it is easy to see that the players aren’t receiving autonomy support – Todd keeps saying so in press conferences. And there is zero on ice leadership at many critical times which means Todd failed in Leadership transference.

    B) the players have to own this shit show. They should all be deeply ashamed. The on ice leaders should be sickened to the center of their souls. To end with a Badger Bobism. “Each day, each game is a new chance to prove yourself. It is never too late to be great.” It is time for the young core of the Oilers to begin the journey to greatness.

    Great stuff as usual VOR. A minor little point really stood out for me, referring to Badger Bob; “But he also was warm, funny, and joyful.”

    How important is this? Last year the boys seemed so happy and thrilled to be playing. Now it looks like the rink is the last place on earth they want to be.

    Is it possible for a coach to infuse some joy and happiness in his players, even during a dreadful season? Maybe it’s not even important, but if they had some fun and lightened up a bit, I think they would be better prepared to deal with such a disastrous season.

  25. Psyche says:

    My gut tells me there are a few prospects at the U of A with more potential than an NCAA Div 3 player.
    His numbers are great for that level. But, on its’ face, it seems like a heckuva reach for a contract spot.

  26. RonnieB says:

    rickithebear:
    My Ufa targets are wingers
    Maroon
    Grabner

    People complain about Puljujarvi,s progress
    Even points:
    Tkachuk draft +1 (19yr)
    76gm 10evg (..132 evgpg) 35evp (.461 evppg)
    Puljujarvi draft +2 (19yr)
    48gm 9evg (.188 evgpg) 16 evg (.333 evppg)

    Tkachuk draft +2 (20yr)
    64gm 14evg (.219 evgpg) 32evp (.500 evppg)
    Puljujarvi draft +3 (20yr)
    ???????????????.

    Centres
    McDavid
    Draisatl
    Strome
    Khaira

    RW
    RNH
    Puljujarvi
    Aberg
    Kassian

    LW
    No clue of the depth structure
    Available
    Lucic
    Slepyshev
    Yamamoto

    The only dmen I have some level of trust
    Larson
    Sekera
    Russel
    Benning
    Ohvitu

    Goalie
    Talbot

    You have left-handed RNH playing the RW and 2 right-handed wingers ( Slepy and Yamamoto ) playing LW ?

    You don’t trust Nurse ?

  27. Psyche says:

    VOR,

    I appreciate your coaching academic analysis. Unfortunately Bob Johnson coached a very different athlete in his era, in a sport with a very unique culture. He was definitely effective but I bet he did not succeed by being meta or micro.
    At the end of the day talent rules. Underdogs rarely succeed. And coaches rarely “coach-up” athletes or teams. Talent rises to the top. The Oilers have some great talent, but not across the board – it lacks in depth and breadth.
    Coaching makes a difference in the seams. It can have small impacts on athletes and teams. It doesn’t account for the Oilers’ large success last season or the large decline this season. It contributed to both, but it isn’t solely responsible.

  28. hunter1909 says:

    After conducting an analysis of the team’s expected final points tally I was able to come up with an estimate of 13 points which makes for a 71 point total and excellent lottery chances. Of course if Chiarelli+McLellan stay it won’t make any difference.

    Meanwhile, watching Connor McDavid’s uncanny ability to rise in the Art Ross sweepstakes while simultaneously losing games makes me suspect that he’s in on the tank – also I expect a full scale Palace revolution this summer with GM+coach both booted and OBC stalwarts Paul Coffey and Wayne Gretzky stepping up to take control, although not necessarily replacing Chiarelli/McLellan.

    I’ll be happy to see my all-time fave Oiler Paul Coffey get a shot. I particularly like the way he talked to Ethan Bear about playing his first NHL game – not to worry etc.

  29. RonnieB says:

    Psyche,

    Psyche:
    My gut tells me there are a few prospects at the U of A with more potential than an NCAA Div 3 player.
    His numbers are great for that level. But, on its’ face, it seems like a heckuva reach for a contract spot.

    The Oilers only have 29 players on next season’s 50-man roster and have a bunch of holes to fill in Bakersfield and Wichita. I don’t see the problem with taking a flier on a kid whose performance took such a leap forward this year.

  30. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Georges: My short answer would be Sutter. That LAK team played with ridiculous intensity for a few years and won twice. Yes, Quick the first time, but not as much Quick the second time. I have no idea why he hasn’t been hired yet. You eliminate the winning coach variable from the overall equation and then see what else is needed beyond that to make the equation work. We made the mistake of hiring a not winning coach and then taking franchise altering steps on personnel when that coach didn’t win.

    He oversaw a drug infested locker room that was a big part of their ‘intensity’ and didn’t adapt to his changing environment.

    I remember wondering why the Kings could go 110% three periods no fade in their first cup and every one else looked like they ‘weren’t trying’.

    He also had a stellar roster at early points.

    Who was the coach who said the secret to his success was the guys getting on the bus before him?

  31. Gayfish says:

    RonnieB:
    Psyche,

    The Oilers only have 29 players on next season’s 50-man roster and have a bunch of holes to fill in Bakersfield and Wichita. I don’t see the problem with taking a flier on a kid whose performance took such a leap forward this year.

    There’s a 20 yo on his team who is basically as good… Might as well sign Taro.

  32. Lowetide says:

    Gerta Rauss:
    Matty’s latest in up at the Journal-out of respect for our hosts wishes I won’t post the link but the quote that caught my eye was a comment from Klefbom regarding his shoulder and NOT requiring surgery this spring/summer, but he would NOT be playing in the world championships if Sweden asks him to participate

    Links always welcome, unless they are accompanied with “you think this crap Lowetide writes is good? Try this!” which did in fact happen. 🙂

  33. Professor Q says:

    Lowetide: Links always welcome, unless they are accompanied with “you think this crap Lowetide writes is good? Try this!” which did in fact happen.

    I admit nothing.

  34. ArmchairGM says:

    Wilde:
    ArmchairGM,

    You know what our AHL team really needed? Another Patrick Russell.

    Yup, and the Oilers need that even less.

  35. Yeti says:

    Lowetide:
    Oilers sign Colin Larkin, Dylan’s brother, as per Mark Divver

    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=220012

    Finally we have our sniper for Connor.

  36. Gayfish says:

    Wilde:
    ArmchairGM,

    You know what our AHL team really needed? Another Patrick Russell.

    What do you want them to do; play actual prospects?

  37. Gerta Rauss says:

    Lowetide: Links always welcome, unless they are accompanied with “you think this crap Lowetide writes is good? Try this!” which did in fact happen.

    lol…link is below

    And it’s up at the Sun, not the Journal (old habits die hard)

    He has some quotes from Bear as well, and a note about the draft pick for Montoya (he has played in 5 games so far)

    http://edmontonsun.com/sports/hockey/nhl/edmonton-oilers/shoulder-injury-to-edmonton-oilers-klefbom-keeping-him-out-of-worlds

  38. Professor Q says:

    Gerta Rauss: lol…link is below

    And it’s up at the Sun, not the Journal (old habits die hard)

    He has some quotes from Bear as well, and a note about the draft pick for Montoya (he has played in 5 games so far)

    http://edmontonsun.com/sports/hockey/nhl/edmonton-oilers/shoulder-injury-to-edmonton-oilers-klefbom-keeping-him-out-of-worlds

    I guess we go fourth into that good night. Gently or otherwise.

  39. VOR says:

    Psyche:
    VOR,

    I appreciate your coaching academic analysis. Unfortunately Bob Johnson coached a very different athlete in his era, in a sport with a very unique culture. He was definitely effective but I bet he did not succeed by being meta or micro.
    At the end of the day talent rules. Underdogs rarely succeed. And coaches rarely “coach-up” athletes or teams. Talent rises to the top. The Oilers have some great talent, but not across the board – it lacks in depth and breadth.
    Coaching makes a difference in the seams. It can have small impacts on athletes and teams. It doesn’t account for the Oilers’ large success last season or the large decline this season. It contributed to both, but it isn’t solely responsible.

    I was using Bob as an example of how a great coach approached Autonomy Support and Leadership Transference. He excelled at both. I didn’t get to Emotional Support. At which he also excelled. All of which said Bob was, in Scotty Bowman’s words “detail oriented to the point of obsession.” Bob was good at both the micro and the macro. Of course he also took a group of underdogs to an Olympic Gold Medal.

    I agree with you very few coaches can coach a team up, at least a hockey team. There is actually evidence in hockey that it makes something like 5 to 8 points difference the year you change coach. The impact of coaching on winning is much smaller than people assume.

    This is why I am not a huge fan of coaching changes. I wouldn’t actually be in favour of turfing TMac and his team if it wasn’t for his constant refrains of “we’ve tried everything.” When you couple that with the team’s implosion you get a portrait of a coach frustrated to despair. He condemns himself and the on ice performance support his self assessment.

    I believe any coach is only as good as the athletes they get a chance to coach. But in individual sports athletes often flourish under one coach where they were stagnating or even going backward with another. Gideon Ariel added 10% to Al Oerter’s best throw for example. The guy was a 4 time Olympic Gold Medalist and Gideon found room for improvement.

    Two more of my mentors, Gerard Mach and Gabor Simonyi had athletes come from all over the world to work with them. Thus they got the best athletes in the world to work with but those athletes remarkably consistently achieved new personal bests which is why athletes kept coming to them. The same was true of Gideon.

    Why this doesn’t work in team sports is unclear. Though I should say in sports other than hockey the impact of coaching is more obvious. Though your basic point would still be strongly supported by the evidence.

    I don’t however agree with you that athletes have changed much since Bob Johnson coached the Pittsburgh Penguins to the Stanley Cup. I know many people share your view point but my experience is that athletes still want what they have always wanted. To be the best they can be.

  40. --hudson-- says:

    VOR,

    What do you think of the Ken Hitchcock approach? Would it work in Edmonton?

    “Hitchcock said the key to being a successful head coach is ensuring your five or six best players are on the same page as you. They need to believe in your message, because if they do the rest of the team will follow. It is crucial to have strong relationship with those players, but also have the ability to challenge them.”
    https://oilersnation.com/2017/06/13/doug-weight-ready-to-succeed-as-a-head-coach/

  41. Rondo says:

    Lowetide,

    A strong Div 3 player.

  42. hunter1909 says:

    VOR: I was using Bob as an example of how a great coach approached Autonomy Support and Leadership Transference. He excelled at both. I didn’t get to Emotional Support. At which he also excelled. All of which said Bob was, in Scotty Bowman’s words “detail oriented to the point of obsession.” Bob was good at both the micro and the macro. Of course he also took a group of underdogs to an Olympic Gold Medal.

    I agree with you very few coaches can coach a team up, at least a hockey team. There is actually evidence in hockey that it makes something like 5 to 8 points difference the year you change coach. The impact of coaching on winning is much smaller than people assume.

    This is why I am not a huge fan of coaching changes. I wouldn’t actually be in favour of turfing TMac and his team if it wasn’t for his constant refrains of “we’ve tried everything.” When you couple that with the team’s implosion you get a portrait of a coach frustrated to despair. He condemns himself and the on ice performance support his self assessment.

    I believe any coach is only as good as the athletes they get a chance to coach. But in individual sports athletes often flourish under one coach where they were stagnating or even going backward with another. Gideon Ariel added 10% to Al Oerter’s best throw for example. The guy was a 4 time Olympic Gold Medalist and Gideon found room for improvement.

    Two more of my mentors, Gerard Mach and Gabor Simonyi had athletes come from all over the world to work with them. Thus they got the best athletes in the world to work with but those athletes remarkably consistently achieved new personal bests which is why athletes kept coming to them. The same was true of Gideon.

    Why this doesn’t work in team sports is unclear. Though I should say in sports other than hockey the impact of coaching is more obvious. Though your basic point would still be strongly supported by the evidence.

    I don’t however agree with you that athletes have changed much since Bob Johnson coached the Pittsburgh Penguins to the Stanley Cup. I know many people share your view point but my experience is that athletes still want what they have always wanted. To be the best they can be.

    I’m nowhere near as intelligent as you, so please understand this as I state that Peter Laviolette had me disbelieving that the 2006 Oilers were going to win game 7 – and was proved correct since MacT, who’d miraculously managed to let Pronger/Peca to lead his team to the finals, yet Laviolette, wearing his heart on his sleeve constantly gave me the impression that he’d fire his team up for that once in a lifetime game that’s a game 7 in a SC final series. Which he did.

    And, considering the incredible beat-down that was game 6, you knew it would take something more than X’s and O’s to inspire the Hurricanes after the massive beat down that was game 6 which had them slaughtered.

    In my opinion Laviolette would be the perfect coach for the Oilers. Barry Trotz might also be the one, although it might be that he’s starting to get to that point where success might never come.

    McLellan’s going to regret taking that personal diet/workout schedule to the extreme; because it’s going to cost him his freaking job lol

  43. hunter1909 says:

    –hudson–:
    VOR,

    What do you think of the Ken Hitchcock approach?Would it work in Edmonton?

    “Hitchcock said the key to being a successful head coach is ensuring your five or six best players are on the same page as you. They need to believe in your message, because if they do the rest of the team will follow. It is crucial to have strong relationship with those players, but also have the ability to challenge them.”
    https://oilersnation.com/2017/06/13/doug-weight-ready-to-succeed-as-a-head-coach/

    FFs, Hitchcock is years past his sell by date. Think of OTC, and those ghastly suits.

  44. hunter1909 says:

    …then there’s the Calgary Flames terrible situation, of having lost their currently 2018 lottery pick to the NYI.

    It won’t be a fun lottery draw for the Flames when Oilers win the Swede, followed by the NYI picking 2nd : p

  45. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    VOR,

    – Vor I’m sure I speak for a lot of us, thanks for putting the time and effort into these posts

    – You and I were among the few (dummies it turns out), that thought they could turn it around, even late untill this season. I now note you say we are years away from the Cup?

    – Just wondering how/what/where/when have you concluded this? I’m not antagonistic, just curious

    – Also re: coach. I’ve been an advocate of keeping him, at least through to 20 or so games next year, so that if he really can’t turn it around, new guy can rescue the season

    – But Coach is getting criticized for being vocal with his exasperation. But I get it: last year this team was a Sek injury away from being in the semis. 104 point team, took care of business against his old team in playoffs. It’s the same team (save Stome for ebs), with Drai and McD a year older. Staff didn’t get dumb.

    – Coach likes to talk about “teaching opportunities”. Should he get a chance of redemption next year (and I honestly don’t know what the best thing is for the long-term health of the organization), he needs to look at himself and his staff to evaluate their teaching opportunities.

  46. BONE207 says:

    Flying across the continent today, I got a chance to read a lot of posts. VOR makes the valid points that a coach shouldn’t have to motivate his players and I agree.

    I play competitively once a week and my Fridays are devoted to my games that night in both thought and body. How I eat, workout, warm up and approach my games mentally makes those days special. I don’t want to let my team down and lose their trust. I want to be healthy when the game is over. I want to win.

    I don’t get paid so I would think that millionaire hockey players can find the time to prepare themselves for the competition they’ve spent all their lives working for.

    Also, does anyone think that Connor, Lucic, Larsson, Talbot, Leon and some of the others need a peptalk? These guys should be leaders in that dept.

    However, in regards to coaching, if the results aren’t coming, why does one continue pounding the square peg into the round hole? The effort there should be finding success and not dressing room cock fighting. TMac doesn’t seem to want to adapt with his player usage and let them roll when there is success. Playing Milan with Connor is to me, poor coaching.

  47. VOR says:

    JimmyV1965: Great stuff as usual VOR. A minor little point really stood out for me, referring to Badger Bob; “But he also was warm, funny, and joyful.”

    How important is this? Last year the boys seemed so happy and thrilled to be playing.Now it looks like the rink is the last place on earth they want to be.

    Is it possible for a coach to infuse some joy and happiness in his players, even during a dreadful season? Maybe it’s not even important, but if they had some fun and lightened up a bit, I think they would be better prepared to deal with such a disastrous season.

    I totally agree with you. But that sort of loosening up usually comes from within the team. The only example I know of a coach publicly doing it was in the NBA.

    Dave Cowens was the player coach for the Celtics when they were the worst team in the NBA (it must have been 78-79). He organized a long series of what he called stupid games for big men, like Go Cart races where you had to keep changing drivers, with the NBA players trying desperately to shoe horn themselves into the tiny cars. These events usually ended up with a dinner of pizza or wings and beers and what Cowens called the prayer. Very solemnly he would intone, “the Kid is really good and Red will get something done.”

    The Kid was the previous year’s highly touted draft pick. His name was Larry Bird. And of course Red got something done he traded his #1 OV and #13 OV in 1980’s draft for #3 OV. Which makes no sense until you know he also got Robert Parrish and then just to rub it in with #3 OV the Celtics drafted Kevin McHale. Some of the players on that terrible Celtics team lived on to be role players on the great teams led by the Big Three.

  48. OmJo says:

    HT Joe:
    HT Joe,

    https://globalnews.ca/news/2927009/a-look-back-at-how-edmontons-rogers-place-is-being-paid-for/

    Total Cost:$614M
    City of Edmonton Direct Cost:$313M
    Fans (Ticket Surcharge): $125M
    Oilers: $166M*

    *Most of this $166M is apparently coming in the form of rent that the Katz group will pay for the building, which should actually be just rent since the Katz group receives all revenue from operating the building, even though taxpayers and ticket buys are paying the gross majority of the arena’s cost.

    *EDIT*I quoted numbers directly from the link.I do realize that the numbers do not add up to $614… I don’t know where the discrepancy is.

    I thought part of the building was being paid off with an arena tax on ticket prices?

  49. BONE207 says:

    Kinger_Oil.redux:
    VOR,

    – You and I were among the few (dummies it turns out), that thought they could turn it around, even late until this season.I now note you say we are years away from the Cup?

    I think we are at least a couple years myself. The contract situations are not letting the Oilers fill in holes in the roster because the $$$ doesn’t fit. So now they have to use stopgaps which may or may not be successful. Until those holes are filled, we won’t achieve the vaunted balance photo so they can be a serious contender. When Russell or Lucic come off the books, we may be almost there with some astute pickups or developed draft picks.

  50. VOR says:

    –hudson–:
    VOR,

    What do you think of the Ken Hitchcock approach?Would it work in Edmonton?

    “Hitchcock said the key to being a successful head coach is ensuring your five or six best players are on the same page as you. They need to believe in your message, because if they do the rest of the team will follow. It is crucial to have strong relationship with those players, but also have the ability to challenge them.”
    https://oilersnation.com/2017/06/13/doug-weight-ready-to-succeed-as-a-head-coach/

    I don’t think it started with Hitchcock. It neatly summarizes Slats approach as well. And Scotty’s. I think it depends on who your five or six players are. With the right core it seems to work really well. Coach Q by all accounts is far more inclusive as is Mike Sullivan and it works for them. I think you work with what you have and what fits your personality.

  51. BONE207 says:

    Total Cost:$614M
    City of Edmonton Direct Cost:$313M
    Fans (Ticket Surcharge): $125M
    Oilers: $166M*

    *Most of this $166M is apparently coming in the form of rent that the Katz group will pay for the building, which should actually be just rent since the Katz group receives all revenue from operating the building, even though taxpayers and ticket buys are paying the gross majority of the arena’s cost.

    *EDIT*I quoted numbers directly from the link.I do realize that the numbers do not add up to $614… I don’t know where the discrepancy is.

    Discrepancy found…the $10 million apples that Katz picked in his back yard. He donated one.

  52. VOR says:

    hunter1909: I’m nowhere near as intelligent as you, so please understand this as I state that Peter Laviolette had me disbelieving that the 2006 Oilers were going to win game 7 – and was proved correct since MacT, who’d miraculously managed to let Pronger/Peca to lead his team to the finals, yet Laviolette, wearing his heart on his sleeve constantly gave me the impression that he’d fire his team up for that once in a lifetime game that’s a game 7 in a SC final series. Which he did.

    And, considering the incredible beat-down that was game 6, you knew it would take something more than X’s and O’s to inspire the Hurricanes after the massive beat down that was game 6 which had them slaughtered.

    In my opinion Laviolette would be the perfect coach for the Oilers. Barry Trotz might also be the one, although it might be that he’s starting to get to that point where success might never come.

    McLellan’s going to regret taking that personal diet/workout schedule to the extreme; because it’s going to cost him his freaking job lol

    One of those meta-tasks I didn’t get to is Embedding Self-Confidence. One step in that is believing in the Athlete even when the Athlete doesn’t believe in themselves. Your athletes will model that behaviour coming to believe in each other and themselves. I don’t much about Laviolette but understand he is a real players coach and that is teams often have serious swagger, swagger far beyond that warranted by their talent.

    Coaching isn’t easy and you seldom see long term coach driven improvements. However, I don’t think any one doubts the Coach’s ability to change the course of one game or one series. This effect washes out over a season is all.

  53. Psyche says:

    VOR,

    Thank you for your response. Individual athlete sports is foreign to me. All my coaching experience (and athletic experience) was in team sports. I had the pleasure of working with a few high performance athletes who came from an individual to a team I coached and they were always possessed greater mental resiliency in training and competition. I always believed that individual sport is a terrific training ground for mental and emotional control. (This makes me think of the story on during intermission tonight about Jeff Skinner’s figure skating background.)

  54. Psyche says:

    As a comparable, here is Golden Bear Luke Philp:
    http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=62115
    22 yr old, RH Centre, 5’10, 180 lbs
    2017-18 GP – 28 G – 11, A – 29, Pts – 40
    Led Canada West in Pts and Pts/GP

    Any hockey knowledgeable people out there that can compare a player of his calibre to Larkin?
    I was under the impression that USport hockey is clearly better than NCAA Div 2 and 3.

  55. Professor Q says:

    A little bit of an aside, but I noticed that Schultz’s “#4” doesn’t have a hole in it. The inside of the yellow number is a tiny bit of white (almost unnoticeable) but also another layer of yellow, without the black hole(s) that say Crosby has in his “#8”. Possibly a threading mess-up by the trainers, similar to “GRETKZY”?

  56. VOR says:

    Kinger_Oil.redux:
    VOR,

    – Vor I’m sure I speak for a lot of us, thanks for putting the time and effort into these posts

    – You and I were among the few (dummies it turns out), that thought they could turn it around, even late untill this season.I now note you say we are years away from the Cup?

    – Just wondering how/what/where/when have you concluded this?I’m not antagonistic, just curious

    – Also re: coach.I’ve been an advocate of keeping him, at least through to 20 or so games next year, so that if he really can’t turn it around, new guy can rescue the season

    – But Coach is getting criticized for being vocal with his exasperation.But I get it: last year this team was a Sek injury away from being in the semis.104 point team, took care of business against his old team in playoffs. It’s the same team (save Stome for ebs), with Drai and McD a year older. Staff didn’t get dumb.

    – Coach likes to talk about “teaching opportunities”.Should he get a chance of redemption next year (and I honestly don’t know what the best thing is for the long-term health of the organization), he needs to look at himself and his staff to evaluate their teaching opportunities.

    I have always believed there was a real chance to win a Stanley Cup this season.

    I have also always thought we were entering a period of Cap Hell where the age/experience distribution of the team would be non-optimal for winning a Cup. Basically for the next few years we are going to constantly be auditioning kids to be the cheap help to support our highly paid core.

    Over time some will stick and still be cheap enough to leave room for one or two more high priced pieces. As the cap rises we will also have more flexibility. Our prospect pool will also get richer and deeper as more and more positions are filled with real NHL players and young ones at that and prospects are blocked at every turn. And our core will get more experienced and wiser. But all this takes time. I am guessing at the four or five years but am pretty confident about the Oilers Cup window being closed for the next few years.

    Keep in mind that I also believe once it opens again the McDavid Oilers will win multiple Cups. I worry fan impatience will cause management to panic and trade away more value causing the dynasty I see growing to wilt and die.

  57. VOR says:

    Kinger_Oil.redux:
    VOR,

    – Vor I’m sure I speak for a lot of us, thanks for putting the time and effort into these posts

    – You and I were among the few (dummies it turns out), that thought they could turn it around, even late untill this season.I now note you say we are years away from the Cup?

    – Just wondering how/what/where/when have you concluded this?I’m not antagonistic, just curious

    – Also re: coach.I’ve been an advocate of keeping him, at least through to 20 or so games next year, so that if he really can’t turn it around, new guy can rescue the season

    – But Coach is getting criticized for being vocal with his exasperation.But I get it: last year this team was a Sek injury away from being in the semis.104 point team, took care of business against his old team in playoffs. It’s the same team (save Stome for ebs), with Drai and McD a year older. Staff didn’t get dumb.

    – Coach likes to talk about “teaching opportunities”.Should he get a chance of redemption next year (and I honestly don’t know what the best thing is for the long-term health of the organization), he needs to look at himself and his staff to evaluate their teaching opportunities.

    Re: the Coach

    He has been telling us since training camp the team had issues. The amount of bad mouthing he has done is quite remarkable.

    I would love to know if he was trying to shake up a team that arrived at the end of training camp with false ideas about how easy winning is and then repeatedly struggled with vexations never mind adversity. Or was he trying to lower expectations.

    Did his negative appraisals contribute to the collapse or just honestly describe the worsening situation?

    If it was the latter he maybe gets some credit for publicly trying to hold the team’s feet to the fire.

  58. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    VOR: I have always believed there was a real chance to win a Stanley Cup this season.

    I have also always thought we were entering a period of Cap Hell where the age/experience distribution of the team would be non-optimal for winning a Cup. Basically for the next few years we are going to constantly be auditioning kids to be the cheap help to support our highly paid core.

    – Not that we will, but next year we could keep the entire roster and be under cap IMO:

    We have $12.7MM of Cap next year.

    Here are fake cap number proposals (which are lower than their actual salaries)

    1) nurse: $4.5
    2) Benning $1.1
    3) Strome $2.5
    4) Cami: $1.2
    5) Sleppy: $1.2
    6) Caggs: $1.2
    7) Auvitu: $800K

    – You can keep the main group, sign above, it’s tight, but doable

    – Of course this won’t happen, but if we thought they were good enough to win cup this year, they could sign them all back next year (of course, in order to be Cup team, Nurse, Slep,Caggs etc had to be better, and if they were, we wouldn’t be able to resign them at these discount prices

  59. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    VOR: Re: the Coach

    If it was the latter he maybe gets some credit for publicly trying to hold the team’s feet to the fire.

    – Nicholson had a quote on HNIC about how they didn’t do a good job of tempering expectations. I took that as they didn’t do a good job of making sure the team was aware of what was required

    – Coach said similar thing in pre-season: something like it’s going to be tough to be as good, boys need to be ready, won’t be as easy this year

    – I think its really possible the boys figured they were going to show up and crush it this year, rather than being prepared, willing and knowing what it takes to crush it, if you know what I mean.

  60. OilClog says:

    Hall scored in his 25th straight game, the dynasty was traded, delusional to suggest there’s still a dynasty possibility. But yea let’s waste another season with the same coach next year to only fire him 20 games in because the results are more of the same.

    Maybe winning the next two drafts will bring back that mythical dynasty.

    Coach just coached a game at the start of March like it’s the preseason. Todd has forgotten what fire is, regardless a player isn’t a whiny baby or anything like that because the coaches message is being tuned out.

    No coach should be able to keep their job when their special teams is an all time worse, that’s grounds to be relieved of your duties in principles and accountability. These are professional athletes, these are professional coaches and everyone needs to be held accountable. No player excuse holds weight in this situation for a coach to keep his job. It sets a absolute embarrassment of a precedence, like icing Lucic night after night on line 1.

    Enough.

  61. JimmyV1965 says:

    VOR: I totally agree with you. But that sort of loosening up usually comes from within the team. The only example I know of a coach publicly doing it was in the NBA.

    Dave Cowens was the player coach for the Celtics when they were the worst team in the NBA (it must have been 78-79). He organized a long series of what he called stupid games for big men, like Go Cart races where you had to keep changing drivers, with the NBA players trying desperately to shoe horn themselves into the tiny cars. These events usually ended up with a dinner of pizza or wings and beers and what Cowens called the prayer. Very solemnly he would intone, “the Kid is really good and Red will get something done.”

    The Kid was the previous year’s highly touted draft pick. His name was Larry Bird. And of course Red got something done he traded his #1 OV and #13 OV in 1980’s draft for #3 OV. Which makes no sense until you know he also got Robert Parrish and then just to rub it in with #3 OV the Celtics drafted Kevin McHale. Some of the players on that terrible Celtics team lived on to be role players on the great teams led by the Big Three.

    Great story VOR!!!

« Older Comments

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!
© Copyright - Lowetide.ca