G80 2017-18: Oilers at Wild

At this point, as much as you’d like to see wins, the organization benefits from a 0-3 week and higher ranking before the lottery balls go marching in. Connor McDavid is in a terrific spot for the Art Ross and the bottom six (Strome and Cammalleri lines) is coming to life. Bet you didn’t see that coming!

THE ATHLETIC!

Great offer! Includes a free 7-day trial so you can try The Athletic on for size free and see if they enjoy the in-depth, ad-free coverage on the site. Offer is here.

  • New Lowetide: Can the Oilers find a partner in a Milan Lucic trade?
  • New Black Dog Pat: What’s the use of continuity when the results don’t inspire confidence?
  • Jonathan Willis: Aberg and Rattie audition for jobs as value contracts in major roles.
  • Lowetide: Condors Curios: Interesting things bubbling under in Bakersfield.
  • Lowetide: What are the Oilers getting in Cooper Marody?
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018: The Oilers and the Republic of Finland
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018: The Oilers and Sweden.
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018: The Oilers and the QMJHL.
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018Oilers and the WHL.
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018: Oilers draft history and the OHL
  • Lowetide: Draft 2018: The Oilers and the NCAA.

LET IT RAIN, YEAR OVER YEAR

  • Oilers in April 2016: 1-1-1, goal differential -1
  • Oilers in April 2017: 4-1-0, goal differential +5 
  • Oilers in April 2018: 0-0-0
  • April 2, 2016: Calgary 5, Edmonton 0 (Source)
  • April 1, 2017: Edmonton 3, Anaheim 2 (OT) (Source)

The 2016 team was running out the string and last year’s team was ripping the cover off the ball. Only three games this April, will this team get to 75 points?

AFTER 79, YEAR OVER YEAR

  • Oilers 15-16: 30-42-7, goal differential -48 (67 points)
  • Oilers 16-17: 44-26-9, goal differential +38 (97 points)
  • Oilers 17-18: 34-39-6, goal differential -31 (74 points)
  • April 2, 2016: Calgary 5, Edmonton 0 (Source)
  • April 6, 2017: Edmonton 4, San Jose 2 (Source)

There’s nothing really left in terms of goals, beyond McDavid’s scoring title. One thing I’d like to see? Jesse Puljujarvi hit 15 goals. He needs three.

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM APRIL

  • On the road to: Minnesota (Expected 0-1-0) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • At home to: Vegas, Vancouver (Expected 1-1-0) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • Overall expected results: 1-2-0, two points in three games
  • Overall actual results: 0-0-0 

I remember reading many years ago in one of those glossy hockey magazines (they all had crazy titles like “Hockey Pictorial” or “Hockey World!” or “Hockey Illustrated”) about Walter Tkazcuk’s early NHL experiences. John Ferguson of the Montreal Canadiens walloped the young Rangers center from Emstedetten, Germany. After the game, Ferguson growled about “these guys coming over and taking our jobs” and I expect that statement reflected the game at the time. 

Fast forward to modern times and honestly the world is a better place. I have written on this blog about Jujhar Khaira 120 times, including the first one which includes a fabulous joke from PunjabiOil and the best scouting report of the day from CrazyCoach in the comments section. Bottom line: We’ve talked about this player as a player for years now, discussing his merits as a prospect. We’re not perfect, and our country is miles from being color blind, but in my lifetime things are heading in a better direction. Maybe 100 years from now, when Jujhar Khaira the fifth is drafted, things will be better still. That is my sincere hope.

THE NEXT 15 DAYS

A week from now, the season will be over. Garbage bag day and the exit interviews will be done and (likely) the media avails for Peter Chiarelli and Todd McLellan scheduled. Two weeks from now, we’ll know more about the direction of the team and we’ll know about injuries (I expect at least one revelation that will explain a lot) that impacted the year.

Bob Stauffer tweeted out late last night about the team’s direction. In my final RE post previewing the 2016-17 season, I wrote the following:

  • The Edmonton Oilers remain a marriage of clusters, with the Connor McDavid cluster gaining in size and momentum with each passing month. The cluster with players in their prime is about the same as a year ago, but there has been a tremendous shakeup in its style and form—one of the key changes over the summer. Finally, the team remains incomplete but is maddeningly close—only a Chad Johnson, a Cody Franson and a Jonathan Marchessault away from the balance photo. It may happen during the season, but does not look like it will come by mid-October. Source

I think the Oilers can be straightened out fairly quickly, although money’s too tight to mention and that’s a real problem. One of the main priorities of the offseason will be finding a way to get the cap situation in a better place.

EARLY ATTEMPT: THE SUMMER LIST

  1. Ownership needs to figure out management and management needs to figure out coaching.
  2. A trade involving Milan Lucic, Andrej Sekera, Kris Russell out needs to happen this summer.
  3. A second-pairing RD. Note: I am not in agreement on this as a priority but it’s fairly obvious the Oilers are going to make a move to address the situation. I don’t think they’ll go Karlsson big but there’s a Tyson Barrie, Matt Dumba, Dougie Hamilton coming to our town.
  4. A scoring right-winger. This player might be an internal solution (Jesse Puljujarvi, Kailer Yamamoto, first-round draft pick).
  5. A Fernando Pisani. A player with great utility who can help in all situations and play the mentor role for youngsters.
  6. A strong backup goalie.

It goes without saying that a trade of Oscar Klefbom or RNH isn’t addressing the problem but rather moving the problem to a new spot on the roster.

LOWDOWN WITH LOWETIDE

A busy morning, TSN 1260 beginning at 10. Our coverage will change over this week from the season at hand to the summer ahead. It should make for interesting discussion. Scheduled to appear:

  • Pierre Lebrun, The Athletic and TSN. Taylor Hall is a very strong candidate for the Hart Trophy, changes in Edmonton this summer.
  • Eric Fawcett, Press Basketball. The clock struck midnight Saturday, we are left with two strong offensive teams in the championship game.
  • Jason Gregor, TSN. How bold will the Oilers be this summer?

10-1260 text, @Lowetide on twitter. See you on the radio!

 

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229 Responses to "G80 2017-18: Oilers at Wild"

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  1. Wilde says:

    A laboured final five minutes with plenty of rough stuff as the series will go all the way to 7 games.

  2. Wilde says:

    These WHL kids managed to shave 5 seconds off the clock before getting into it AGAIN, this time with the gloves off.

  3. Wilde says:

    2018 Eligible Ty Smith has probably been the best player on the Chiefs for this whole series. Would be a sweep without him.

  4. Wilde says:

    Game 7 is tomorrow night in Portland.

    Yamamoto had one assist tonight, would have had two but a goal was waived off by incidental contact when he crashed the crease. Already an Oiler.

  5. deardylan says:

    smellyglove,

    SG,

    “I know, game time. But I need to engage the Lowetide hive mind.”

    Its always game time… especially in our game of life too! So no problem asking. The comments today on race and diversity show alot of game going on in peoples minds and life experience.

    “I’m at a crossroads with my job and career.”

    Awesome! Transitions and crossroads are the stuff of legend where opportunity meets the unknown. That is where I spend most of my work in supporting others in these transition twilight zones!

    ” I’m driven by mission and values, currently employed with excellent flexibility. Set my own work hours, etc. I’m good at my job, but have also been feeling then change bug. New job offer, still missions driven, but it would be working for the man: nice paycheck. Anyone else have stories about choosing the flexibility versus payday route?”

    SG you are in a fantastic situation– you currently have set up yourself with a flexible and good job and now you want an even greater one! (especially with one with sweet financial rewards). Why not?!!

    “Either I choose flexibility or I choose the payday/working for the man?”

    My question to you: Why do these two things have to be divergent paths?

    Try this thought experiment question that uses convergent thinkin’:

    In what ways can I create employment that offers BOTH flexibility AND the payday route at the same time?

    Getting creative helped me to move from good job to great job

    My Recent Story to Share:

    Divergent Thinking: Dylan you need a vacation. If you go on a month long vacations to Hawaii its gonna cost $. I need to work more (in Vietnam) to go on a long vacation.

    Convergent Thinking:

    How can I get paid to travel? Paid – one thing. Travel – same thing.

    From that thinking I am working in Hawaii right this moment, getting paid to travel, go to my friends wedding here, listen to Oilers, coach executives around this wondrous planet and even map out my next work/vacation!

    Share your answer with this forum and we can go from there!

  6. Melvis says:

    Georges,

    Well yeah. I forgot to mention I don’t have any dependents.;-)

  7. Wilde says:

    A quote from the Athletic article linked earlier in the comments here hits on stuff I’ve been talking about with rebuilding Bakersfield:

    “Their farm system has changed dramatically in a two-year span,” Corey Pronman, The Athletic’s hockey prospect expert, said. “When I’ve been doing these farm rankings, the Devils have almost always been at the bottom, if not at the very bottom for most of the last decade. Having a lot of picks matters. It’s a lot better. There’s a lot more talent and a lot more upside in the system. I don’t know if any of these guys will become stars, but if you take enough swings on guys with talent, and eventually you land a Jesper Bratt.

    This is why you do not burn picks for Al Montoya. This is why you shotgun out late picks. The Devils picked 20 times in 2 years, who did they sell?

    PA Parenteau. Vern Fiddler. Eric Gelinas. Lee Stempniak. Marek Zidlicky.

    You don’t have to sell good players.

  8. Mr. D. says:

    This team has switched to run and gun. Defense doesn’t matter. We only have one guy with any bullets in his six shooter. Most are firing blanks.
    If you don’t have balance. You don’t win.
    This team is in a heap of trouble for the near future.

  9. Ribs says:

    Mr. D.: This team has switched to run and gun. Defense doesn’t matter. We only have one guy with any bullets in his six shooter. Most are firing blanks.

    It was more fun when we had a chance at winning the track meets…

  10. deardylan says:

    Epic Story VOR! My mind expanded just reading this. Keep sharing your stories as this makes LT.ca a place to keep learning and experiencing being truely alive!

    Re: Jujhar Khaira

    Any one that makes it to NHL gets a tip of hat from me.

    Its is a journey that very few make and even fewer make it with a last name of Khaira with his ancestral background. Although I am sure if we tested the DNA history of past NHL greats—we would find some interesting mixing from the hidden family tree. Imagine the names of the maternal side?? hmmmm

    A few years ago it was European names and even Russian last names would be exotic. Even Gretzky’s and Lindros’s name sounded exotic. Now they are common place. In fact drafting Canadians might not be the defacto in future since our country is so small as NHL talent and teams expand.

    Eventually the NHL will be full of names from across all continents as we mix, mix, mix together. If you haven’t done a DNA test yet…do one. You might be surprised by all the mixing that has already gone on in your genetic past. Maybe there is some surprises along the way!

    PS. A few years ago it was hard to find a Dylan in NHL and now there are many of them. Maybe the mothers fell in love with my name during 90210? Or was it Bob Dylan? Matt Dylan? Dylan Thomas?!

    VOR:
    I want to tell the story of my friend Larry. Yesterday LT mentioned he was thinking about those people from his life who had passed. I knew exactly what he meant.

    Larry was a great person and one of the most competitive humans I have ever met. With the game on the line he wanted the ball in his hands. Well he always wanted the ball in his hands. But we will come to that,

    One of the things I loved about Larry was the fact he worked tirelessly with poor and disadvantaged youth. And he dragged a bunch of us into helping him. He really didn’t give me a choice. He just told me where and when to show up.

    Larry also liked everyone. He’d have these BBQ parties and the food was amazing. He’d invite his entire rich, white neighbourhood and all his friends. The friends were all the colours and orientations of the rainbow. And under his guiding hand we’d all be equals. His smile and laugh were infectious.

    But as a teammate I knew a different Larry. He was this epic ball hog. He’d read me the riot act every time I took a shot. His job not mine. Every time I blew a pick or missed my defensive assignment he’d scream at me.

    The Larry I knew was also a racist. He truly thought I was inferior to him because of the colour of my skin.

    Larry was shooting guard to my point guard. He was 5’7″ and 175 but he could slam dunk. The air time he got defied logic and he was blazing fast.

    But he truly believed based on the colour of my skin:

    -that he was faster than me
    -that he could jump higher than me
    -that he was a better basketball player than me
    -that he was a better dancer than me
    -that he was cooler than me
    -that he was more righteous than me
    -that he could barbecue better than me

    All these things were demonstrably true. But Larry wrongly attributed them to the colour of my skin.

    He’d introduce me, depending on the audience as “his white friend’” or “my honky bro”.

    I was always bringing him research studies showing how racial differences are illusory. He’d say something like, “you get faster overnight white boy?”

    I eventually pointed out I am a 1/4 Southern Conference Black. Larry looked at me for the longest time and then said, “that explains so much.”

    The next time I missed him with a pass he yells, “your making our people look bad.”

    Then he took to introducing me as, “the whitest nigger i ever met.”

    One night I was helping Larry clean up after a party and we actually talked about the racial divide that separated us.

    “I get you aren’t white. That more than half your genes come from people of colour. But you were raised white, you think white, and you act white. You are so white you happily tell people you aren’t white knowing they will still think of you as white. It is just a funny fluke of genetics to you. Your colour doesn’t define you. But mine defines me,” he said.

    “But I don’t fit anywhere,” I said.

    “True enough but your one weird dude. You weren’t going to fit anywhere anyway. But if I’d been born your colour I could have been somebody,” Larry said.

    “Yeah you could have been a slow white guy who can’t jump and has no sense of rhythm,” I retaliated. “Think what the world would have lost. The worst ball hog the world’s ever seen.”

    At which point he laughed and I started to laugh and we sat on his driveway on a beautiful summer night laughing.

    But in the end we drifted apart. I had to read in the newspaper that he died. Of course the media focussed on his Hall of Fame Football career. Not a single outlet mentioned what a great basketball player Larry was or what a great human. Nobody mentioned the hundreds of kids whose life’s he changed, what a great coach and teacher he became. No, they just talked about his career as a kickoff returner.

    Because apparently that is how people thought of him, as the greatest kick returner in CFL history. Not as the guy who donated thousands of hours of his life to making Edmonton a better place to live. Or who became a great and beloved high school coach.

    I miss Larry every time I pick up a basketball or fire up my BBQ.

    Larry wherever you are I hope they are letting you take all the shots and cook all the meat.

  11. Ribs says:

    Is The Dynasty over now that the Sedin’s are retiring? Or when is the next parade planned for?

    Career Canucks. I’d feel bad for them, but it looks like they are winning at life! So long, cutters of piss!

  12. Munny says:

    Melvis: The English Patient was on yesterday. It’s surface story suggests one thing. Elaine Benis hated it – which suggests another take. And in my view, it’s a great earth, air, fire, water, aether story – if I ever saw one. Those signals reside in every scene. I suspect Ondaatje wouldn’t dispute it’s visual retelling.

    It’s a far better book than movie, IMO… lol, I guess what isn’t? But as far as Minghella movies go, it is his best.

    Novels don’t translate to screen well. Short stories work better, but still have problems. Genre of course is also a factor.

    Minghella liked to adapt novels. Ones with some adventure in the narrative structure at that, making his task all that much more difficult. He does much better with The English Patient than Highsmith’s Ripley. I feel like he gets around the fundamental differences between writing and cinema (ie seeing in your mind versus seeing on the screen) by distracting with intense acting.

    He has actors with those chops in Patient, but in Ripley he has Damon doing his “watch me work” thing and it just isn’t enough.

    He has another trick… investing your eye in lush environments. And again Patient is more successful than Ripley or Cold Mountain. It’s elemental, as you point out.

    Ideally though you have the past creating the present, or competing with it in some way. He trusts too much in the sheer power of character(s), and doesn’t leverage the narrative structure.

    It’s not the movie’s fault, but “burn victim” has always struck me as a little on the nose within the cinematic parfumerie of les romances. Just sayin…

  13. Munny says:

    Ribs:
    Is The Dynasty over now that the Sedin’s are retiring? Or when is the next parade planned for?

    Career Canucks. I’d feel bad for them, but it looks like they are winning at life! So long, cutters of piss!

    Can’t have a Game One in Canuckland without raising something to the rafters… the good ole Dys.

  14. New Improved Darkness says:

    deardylan:
    I was always bringing him research studies showing how racial differences are illusory. He’d say something like, “you get faster overnight white boy?”

    I’ve been reading the race-IQ literature lately. The best you can say is that race is a flimsy construct. It’s not nothing, but neither is it anything you can make much with, scientifically.

    Perception of race is another matter entirely. We seem to somehow be wired to construct Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons. And not just in the positive sense, but in the negative sense as well.

    I was watching Schindler’s List for the third or forth time the other night and I suddenly realized I was simply tired of the core story, I’ve covered that ground so many times. At this point I would rather watch a movie about how the survivors put their lives back together again. so far as that proves possible.

    Recently, I’ve also checked out the phenomena known as Jordan Peterson. He’s more interesting that the media originally portrayed him, though that changed somewhat along the way.

    Jordan and I are practically doppelgangers in birth year and birth city, and there were similarities in our childhoods, too (but he went back to religion and I didn’t). Not much different, either, in our cognitive aptitude that I can discern. But he likes Jung, and I like the formal nihilism of Heisenberg, Godel, Turing, Chaitin, and Kolmogorov (limits, limits everywhere; Look, Ma!—no metaphysical root stock!)

    It’s a great thing, really, to look into the mirror and stare the opposite path straight in the eye. Unnerving, but salutary.

    The main point from Jordan—who mainly studies totalitarianism—is that we descend into our worst instincts awfully damn easily. Most people don’t fully understand the warning signs that you’re already a street too far on the road to social madness, and then your moral choices decline by incremental degree: plain old family guy Breaking Bad bit by bit. Not quite the banality of evil, but closer to home than most people think.

    There seems to be part of our social instinct that if you haven’t got a protective flock, you better make one (new rule!) using any social criteria whatsoever—all the better if it’s superficially obvious to everyone involved. And race fits that bill, for the most part.

    Raw human instinct says: best to vilify the other before the other vilifies you, even if the other doesn’t exist and you have to make your opposing group up. But of course, this maneuver soon succeeds in willing your adversaries into belated existence.

    Raw human instinct says: It’s dangerous not to define those whom you hate. Deep down, it seems, we’re all pretty sure that everyone getting along is an evil trick, to be unmasked as a giant sham moments before the final solution.

    Brazil is interesting, or at least São Paulo, which I have heard described by people I trust as having nearly an unbroken spectrum from white to black and many Asian shades in between. Little harder to arrange clean bucket edges in such a society.

    Miscegenation FTW!

    But actually, children of mixed couples don’t all come out the same shade, and it’s quite possible for the (perceived) racial divergence to begin anew (by the power of assortative mating). Thus, It seems to me that so long as like marries like, we’ll be stuck with partial solutions for a human eternity, though I tend to view the us/them problem as bigger than race (we’d surely find something else almost as divisive, if race wasn’t so damn handy).

    Nature abhors a vacuum (apart from, you know, 99.999999% of the known universe); human nature abhors an empty “other” (apart from here and there a small liberal democracy examined at a happy moment, under especially fresh snow, with also a strong history filter, and not on game day).

    I almost feel like if race didn’t exist, humanity would feel compelled to invent it. We really, really seem to want it a lot: not race itself, but all the ugliness that race enables. When all that ugliness leaves the room, we seem to feel disoriented, defenseless, exposed, and somehow naked. More and more I feel that it’s the bad behaviour itself that humanity craves, and the more I learn, the less I feel that any particular pretext is instrumental.

    So, science might say that race doesn’t exist (elaborately neglecting the painfully obvious) but even so, I’m damn sure—as social beings—we’re busy abhorring the factual vacuum into a real thing. Perhaps more slowly over time. Inshallah, we shall see.

  15. NYC-Back-to-Tokyo Oil (Gentleman Backpacker) says:

    Nix:
    Sumo wrestling culture is monolithic and it’s a big problem.

    Go oilers.

    When you don’t know what you are talking about you don’t know.

  16. hunter1909 says:

    New Improved Darkness: I was watching Schindler’s List for the third or forth time the other night and I suddenly realized I was simply tired of the core story, I’ve covered that ground so many times. At this point I would rather watch a movie about how the survivors put their lives back together again. so far as that proves possible.

    I befriended an old Holocaust survivor. He’d been through the system and when he and his wife first arrived in Toronto they cried with joy at the sight of bread.

    He’d also purchased a building on Yonge Street which he sold his second hand clothes from and was continually pestered by real estate agents trying to talk him into selling on the premise he would get gold; to which he’d reply “You can’t eat gold”.

    Turns out gold isn’t what it’s cracked up to be.

    Like my pal the computer nerd liked to say; “Counting to ten is easy? Try counting to ten in a phone booth full of hornets”. Or… something about rich people at the end of the world, desperately trying to turn gold into lead.

  17. GMB3 says:

    Gret99zky:
    I’d rather the scouts had to work harder than lose out the string.

    So sick of losing.

    Hard to believe that after 10 years fans are still willing to cheer for losses in order to gain 2-3% better chance at a lottery ball.

    This false pretense of pride in a lost season does no one any good. If recent developments have shown anything it’s that you need to get good players and keep good players.

    We’ve already gotten rid of too many good players. Let’s give ourselves the best odds on replacing that talent. Also heads should roll.

    (I wouldn’t count on the Oilers scouting staff getting anything right either)

  18. godot10 says:

    I don’t think Marc Pouliot was mentioned in this thread, even though the player who cannot be named scored a couple of goals. Maybe it is finally over.

  19. GMB3 says:

    Professor Q: Eberle had significant time in the AHL, actually, all things considered (and contrasted with “straight to the NHL”).

    I don’t think playing in the AHL at the end of a junior season means he didn’t go straight to the NHL from junior. And if you are referring to a 30 game stint in the AHL, you may not remember this but there was a lock out that season.

    He had already established himself as a full time NHLer. All things considered, he’s an undersized forward from the WHL that went straight to the NHL.

  20. Wilde says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    Well, this post certainly went places.

  21. Jethro Tull says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    Best post ever.

  22. Professor Q says:

    GMB3: I don’t think playing in the AHL at the end of a junior season means he didn’t go straight to the NHL from junior. And if you are referring to a 30 game stint in the AHL, you may not remember this but there was a lock out that season.

    He had already established himself as a full time NHLer. All things considered, he’s an undersized forward from the WHL that went straight to the NHL.

    He had two of those stints, however, and this would be two years before the lockout stint. Those 20 games (9 and then 11) and extra WHL time surely have to count for something.

  23. GMB3 says:

    Professor Q: He had two of those stints, however, and this would be two years before the lockout stint. Those 20 games (9 and then 11) and extra WHL time surely have to count for something.

    He finished up his WHL career in 2010? And started his NHL career that fall. 1 + 1 = 2?

    Are you a professor? If so, are you an English professor?

  24. Professor Q says:

    GMB3: He finished up his WHL career in 2010? And started his NHL career that fall. 1 + 1 = 2?

    Are you a professor? If so, are you an English professor?

    Don’t be obtuse. It is unbecoming of you.

    Eberle played 3 seasons with Regina and then a year-end stint with Springfield. Instead of joining Edmonton straight from the WHL the next season (said extra WHL time), he then played another season with Regina and then another year-end stint with Springfield.

    Then, after that, he joined Edmonton.

    Then, two years after his last AHL game (playing two seasons in Edmonton), the lockout had him back in the AHL with OKC (“two years before the lockout stint” =/= “two years before his NHL career”).

    You’re welcome.

  25. GMB3 says:

    Professor Q: Don’t be obtuse. It is unbecoming of you.

    Eberle played 3 seasons with Regina and then a year-end stint with Springfield. Instead of joining Edmonton straight from the WHL the next season (said extra WHL time), he then played another season with Regina and then another year-end stint with Springfield.

    Then, after that, he joined Edmonton.

    Then, two years after his last AHL game, the lockout had him back in the AHL with OKC.

    You’re welcome.

    The point of the entire conversation? Guys starting their pro career in the AHL. Missing the forest for the trees. I imagine being this pedantic makes you a riot at parties.

    Jordan Eberle went from playing in the WHL in 2009/2010 to the NHL in 2010/2011. This is so simple it mystifies me.

    Brendan Gallagher played 36 games for Hamilton to start his professional career. I believe that would be starting his career in the AHL.

  26. GMB3 says:

    Oh ya “you’re welcome”

    Dink.

  27. Professor Q says:

    GMB3:
    Oh ya “you’re welcome”

    Dink.

    I really don’t think you can say much when your previous implication was that my English was insufficient, when in fact you were the one who clearly didn’t grasp a properly constructed English statement. No matter how much you attempt to backtrack now.

  28. Professor Q says:

    GMB3,

    He already had 9 AHL games at the time, and had 11 more games in between that WHL season and the next NHL season. Sure, 20 games isn’t 36, but it’s more than 0 games.

    Those experiences undoubtedly helped him prepare better for Edmonton’s training camp that Autumn. Otherwise, maybe he would have started in the AHL that season. I do believe the verbal at the time was similar to such. It could perhaps be considered an unconventional outlier in the pool.

  29. GMB3 says:

    Professor Q: I really don’t think you can say much when your previous implication was that my English was insufficient, when in fact you were the one who clearly didn’t grasp a properly constructed English statement. No matter how much you attempt to backtrack now.

    I was going to actually ask you if this is the proper time to use pedantic, so your assumption is wrong. I actually asked that because I’ve noticed you use the English language really well. This isn’t backtracking.

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