This Wheel’s on Fire

My all-time favorite ballplayer is Tim Raines, and that’s never going to change. I can’t tell you why, but maybe I can show you. Batting a buck-50 against Orosco when he hit it, what a beautiful ballplayer. Raines was perfect save for an average throwing arm, but he made up for it by always hitting the cutoff man. I bet he didn’t bleed 20 runs defensively as an Expo.

When he arrived, the Expos knew what they had, and Raines’ speed was so great the organization decided to move him from left field to second base. It was insane, but Montreal had a need and Raines was an all-world athlete. His agent ended the experiment in 1982, as I recall. He phoned the young man and said ‘you’re not playing second base anymore’ and that’s all she wrote. Sometimes professional organizations lose their heads, and for some reason it is often over gifted youngsters. You’d think they would know better.

THE ATHLETIC!

Great playoff special! Try The Athletic on for size free and see if they enjoy the in-depth, ad-free coverage on the site. Offer is here. There’s a 7-day free trial and the cost for an annual subscription is less than one (or two) coffee per month, depending on where you buy your hot liquid. We have a mountain of good reading to come in the next 30 days at The Athletic Edmonton, including draft coverage, prospect updates and reaction to the deals of summer. Join us, for the Oilers coverage, stay for all of the other brilliant writing on the site.

JESSE PULJUJARVI COMPARABLES

via hockey-reference

The list of comparables for JP runs from the good (Dustin Brown, Mike Fisher, Tomas Tatar, David Clarkson) to the rest. It is not a fabulous list but it’s also true we’re talking about a gifted teenager who has been used in all kinds of roles. Puljujarvi performs well with Connor McDavid but everyone does.

  • 2017-18 with McDavid: 54.6 CF 5×5; 1.87 5×5/60 scoring  
  • 2017-18 w/o  McDavid: 49.0 CF 5×5; 0.97  5×5/60 scoring 

Leon Draisaitl is 2.22/60 with McDavid, Drake Caggiula is 2.05. Puljujarvi could evolve into 97’s right-winger but it isn’t the obvious 2018 training camp move. Puljujarvi with Draisaitl is a different matter.

  • 2017-18 with Draisaitl: 47.4 CF 5×5; 2.37 5×5/60 scoring  
  • 2017-18 w/o  Draisaitl: 51.5 CF 5×5; 1.09  5×5/60 scoring 

The possession number is low but JP scored well with Leon last season. Puljujarvi didn’t score a bunch with Ryan Strome (1.26) as his center but did do well in possession (50.32). I expect he’ll spend the early portion of this coming season on the No. 3 line. I’d run him with McDavid. Seriously. He would be the third wheel offensively, but given time, suspect Puljujarvi settles in and becomes the line’s digger and a more natural NHL shooter. He’s in a race with Yamamoto, though. I think he has this coming season to find chem with 97.

Ryan Martindale photo by Rob Ferguson

DRAFT +1 FORWARDS 5X5 (CHL)

  1. Leon Draisaitl 1.00
  2. Kailer Yamamoto 0.93
  3. Ryan Martindale 0.86
  4. Tyler Benson 0.82
  5. Curtis Hamilton 0.79
  6. Greg Chase 0.77
  7. Kirill Maksimov 0.76
  8. Tobias Rieder 0.73
  9. Tyler Pitlick 0.71
  10. Marco Roy 0.62
  11. Jackson Houck 0.61
  12. Ostap Safin 0.56
  13. Daniil Zharkov 0.56
  14. Drew Czerwonka 0.41
  15. Mitch Moroz 0.39
  16. Kyle Platzer 0.35
  17. Travis Ewanyk 0.18

The 5×5 numbers are always more informative. The prospects beyond Rieder who are in the pipeline (Yamamoto, Benson, Maksimov) have a chance, Benson is in good position because of his range. Of course, Curtis Hamilton was the identical player seven years ago. Yamamoto is the only current prospect forward on this list I’d suggest as a sure thing and as always the player has to prove it. I’m bullish on Maksimov too, truth to tell.

RYAN MANTHA

2018 DRAFT

I’ve spoken to a lot of people about the 2018 draft, ranging from public (Pronman, Boisvert, Wheeler, Kournianos) to private (various scouting sources). The general feeling I get is this is a tepid year for the CHL, with the dub being well off the normal pace. After about No. 12, the 31 lists may vary greatly, which means you could hear a scouting director or general manager say “we drafted three players we had in our top 20” something that happened in 2002. Edmonton whiffed on their first round pick but grabbed Jarrett Stoll and Matt Greene in the second round. The pick at No. 10 is going to be important but No. 40 might give the Oilers a chance to gain ground on the competition.

  • W Samuel Fagemo, Frolunda (SuperElite). Good boots and an excellent shot. He didn’t deliver as much offense as had been hoped but remains a quality prospect.
  • LC Nathan Dunkley, London Knights (OHL). Impressive young player has enough offense to be in the conversation late first round, but could also slide to No. 40.
  • G Oliver Rodrigue, Drummondville (QMJHL). Best NA goalie by consensus, there is an Oilers connection to this player. Will they pull a ‘Musil’?
  • R Jesse Ylonen, Espoo United (Mestis). Could go higher, but if he’s still around this would be a fine choice for the Oilers in the second round.

I’ll have my final list on Friday morning, plus a mock. I think we’ve come to grips with the fact that falling to No. 10, while inconvenient, doesn’t mean the Oilers can’t get a fine player in the first round. They must choose wisely, and I wonder if they’ll go safe (Bouchard) or high risk (Merkley)? Interesting month ahead.

LOWDOWN WITH LOWETIDE

  • Bruce McCurdy, Cult of Hockey. Bruce will walk us through the next 30 days: Draft, trades and getting ready for free agency. What should we expect?
  • John Horn, freelance commentator, aroundthehornmedia.com. The French Open is delivering quality play, some surprises and a good early result for Denis Shapovalov.
  • Steve Kournianos, The Draft Analyst. His final list is out, plus we’ll talk about late risers and fallers.

10-1260 text, @Lowetide on twitter.

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183 Responses to "This Wheel’s on Fire"

  1. Yeti says:

    “I wonder if they’ll go safe (Bouchard) or high risk (Merkley)”.
    Old Oilers would have taken Bouchard every day of the week and twice on Sunday… I’m still guessing they would go with the risk adverse selection if this choice arose, but perhaps the shakeup in scouting and drafting over the past year+ makes this an actual question to ponder: where is Merkley on the Oiler’s list?

  2. Jaxon says:

    I know I’m probably verging on troll territory here, but I’ll say it again: #10 and #40 to Florida for Mascherin, #15 and #34.

  3. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Yeti:
    “I wonder if they’ll go safe (Bouchard) or high risk (Merkley)”.
    Old Oilers would have taken Bouchard every day of the week and twice on Sunday… I’m still guessing they would go with the risk adverse selection if this choice arose, but perhaps the shakeup in scouting and drafting over the past year+ makes this an actual question to ponder: where is Merkley on the Oiler’s list?

    I would imagine Gretzky likes his skill set a lot. From LTs postings KG likes skill with some feisty. Merkley isn’t a physical player but he seems to have an attacking mentality. In a way like Messier at that age. All world potential if you can reign in the young man.

    I’m fine with D not being overly physical, as long as they get the job done in the D zone and don’t back down. They stay healthier that way.

  4. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Jaxon:
    I know I’m probably verging on troll territory here, but I’ll say it again: #10 and #40 to Florida for Mascherin, #15 and #34.

    It’s not unreasonable, if it were my call I’d want a little more back. Normally moving up is costly.

    The Oilers need to be on the side of the ledger of teams that get good value for what they sell. The culture change is completed, there is no reason at all anywhere I can see to bleed anymore from PC or above.

  5. russ99 says:

    Puljujarvi is absolutely the wrong player to play with Nuge – McDavid.

    Not a NHL shot, at least accuracy wise, not great at puck retention/retrieval after the rush and less than inspiring without the puck.

    That line needs a shooter and/or a puck retriever.

    If we bump Nuge to Leon’s line and sign a shooter at LW, then that’s a different story.

    Maybe with Leon would work, but then they need a quality player at LW, and Lucic is going to have to prove he can be that after last year.

    Jesse has a lot to prove in a vital season for him, but it’s not his fault the Oilers rushed him and didn’t give him the right support coming over from Europe, especially in Bakersfield a season ago.

    I wouldn’t just gift him McDavid minutes though. McLellan did well making him earn more playing time last year, he still needs to earn it.

  6. Spooky Lynx says:

    Man, oh man. That Mantha story is near heartbreaking. I’ve had a couple tough injuries in my life, but they could be attributed directly to actions I understood. I can’t imagine how scary it would be to suddenly, unexpectedly go blind in one eye.

    It’s great to read he’s got a positive attitude. I really liked his game in the preseason and thought we might even see him up in the bigs at some point last year.

    Here’s hoping he can somehow make it back. I’m rooting for him.

  7. McSorley33 says:

    Absolute beauty LT.

    Beauty.

    Tim Raines and those wonderful Expo uniforms…

    Love it.

  8. Rafa Nadal says:

    russ99:
    Puljujarvi is absolutely the wrong player to play with Nuge – McDavid.

    Not a NHL shot, at least accuracy wise, not great at puck retention/retrieval after the rush and less than inspiring without the puck.

    That line needs a shooter and/or a puck retriever.

    If we bump Nuge to Leon’s line and sign a shooter at LW, then that’s a different story.

    Maybe with Leon would work, but then they need a quality player at LW, and Lucic is going to have to prove he can be that after last year.

    Jesse has a lot to prove in a vital season for him, but it’s not his fault the Oilers rushed him and didn’t give him the right support coming over from Europe, especially in Bakersfield a season ago.

    I wouldn’t just gift him McDavid minutes though. McLellan did well making him earn more playing time last year, he still needs to earn it.

    Sounds like Yakupov. Sigh. I’m hoping Pulju can prove me wrong, but I think he’ll show us that he doesn’t have what it takes to be a contributing NHLer.

  9. flyfish1168 says:

    Filip Forsberg was the 11 pick in the 2012 draft. If we were to redo this draft I would say he may go 1st overall. So at number 10 we may still get the best player at this draft.

  10. Melvis says:

    VOR..

    “But the view response I got suggests this community isn’t ready to even talk about what it has to teach us.”

    Stephen Sheps tends to be incredibly polite. Good on him.

    Me? Far less so. I’m just going to call a spade a spade this morning… at the risk of instigating some sort of blog argument…which I’ll simply ignore for the rest of the day.

    Your posts regarding the game are much appreciated. But that comment is totally over the top. In fact it consittutes, quite possibly, the most condescending remark I’ve read here this week. I’ll go so far as to suggest it surpasses Cassandra’s various attempts. Those are mostly tolerated because they’re expected – and easily ignored.

    I tend to play the fool. And largely get taken as such. But don’t think for a second I’m completely ignorant of stats, math, analytics, and anything else to do with the hockeying…or life in general. I’ve also been around the block a couple times.

    Generally speaking, concepts and ideas regarding the game interest me much more than “events” regarding the game… past, present, or some fantasy driven future. The notion itself has me ignoring most daily comments in that regard – condescending as that might sound.

    But here’s the thing in a nutshell. I’m not the only one here who has been around the block a couple of times, academically or experiencially. And in my humble view, you and your ego are getting a little ahead of yourself.

  11. russ99 says:

    Rafa Nadal,

    I think his floor is still a good third line forward.

    But we should expect more after being drafted so high.

  12. Scungilli Slushy says:

    flyfish1168:
    Filip Forsberg was the 11 pick in the 2012 draft. If we were to redo this draft I would say he may go 1st overall. So at number 10 we may still get the best player at this draft.

    Good point but not this year.

  13. Scungilli Slushy says:

    russ99:
    Puljujarvi is absolutely the wrong player to play with Nuge – McDavid.

    Not a NHL shot, at least accuracy wise, not great at puck retention/retrieval after the rush and less than inspiring without the puck.

    That line needs a shooter and/or a puck retriever.

    If we bump Nuge to Leon’s line and sign a shooter at LW, then that’s a different story.

    Maybe with Leon would work, but then they need a quality player at LW, and Lucic is going to have to prove he can be that after last year.

    Jesse has a lot to prove in a vital season for him, but it’s not his fault the Oilers rushed him and didn’t give him the right support coming over from Europe, especially in Bakersfield a season ago.

    I wouldn’t just gift him McDavid minutes though. McLellan did well making him earn more playing time last year, he still needs to earn it.

    Boy we sure see JP differently. Scoring is a question, I see no problems elsewhere other than he’s a really young NHLer.

    Yak marches to the beat of, well I’m not sure anyone knows what. I don’t see any similarities and JP is trying to cover the bet of 1OV. It’s only the top 3 that should be reasonably expected to reach draft potentials fully most years. And typically only top 2 see the NHL as young as JP.

    ** Not trying to cover the bet

  14. slopitch says:

    If we’re gonna bring up Filip Forsberg being the best player from 2012, its important to remember that at at age 19 he was developing slowly and traded for Marty Erat. Important season for JP for sure. But lots of time left for him to develop.

    Not my first choice but Id be fine with Ryan Merkley @10. Love his skill.

  15. Stud Muffin says:

    Jaxon:
    I know I’m probably verging on troll territory here, but I’ll say it again: #10 and #40 to Florida for Mascherin, #15 and #34.

    I’m not a fan Mascherin he’s small and isn’t a plus skater, that’s a bad combination.

  16. Melman says:

    It’ll be interesting to see in 2 years if CBJ knew what it was doing on draft day when they surprised everyone. Is Dubois Ryan Johanson v2.0?

  17. Rondo says:

    slopitch,

    NYR may take Merkley with their 3rd pick in the 1st rd. No way Oilers pick him at 10

  18. Rondo says:

    Melman,

    The took a 2-way center over a winger.

  19. Professor Q says:

    I find it very intriguing that Puljujärvi has shown much more to merit NHL player status than Dubois has, yet because he’s on another team posters lament for him and scorn Puljujärvi. I also think he has much more potential than Dubois.

  20. jake70 says:

    Rondo:
    slopitch,

    NYR may take Merkley with their 3rd pick in the 1st rd.No way Oilers pick him at 10

    You know, the Oilers went scorched earth starting 2010, yet the only draft year where they had more than one pick in the first round was 2011, Nuge and Kleftbom. This has irritated me over the years as other teams (I didn’t check) going through the same thing seemed to pick up multiple first rounders along the way, not the Oilers. Just says how low quality the incumbents on those rosters were leading into and beyond 2010 or other GMs were trying to snooker the Oilers. Man.

  21. highgloveside says:

    The Oilers would be better off trading their 2nd pick instead of drafting a goalie. Goalies shouls wait until at least the 3rd round but based on the lack of prospect depth of skaters, they should wait until at least the 4th round this year before mixing with the voodoo.

  22. Rondo says:

    Professor Q,

    PLD is playing # 1 center in Columbus no hiding, JP could easily hide when he played with McDavid.

  23. VOR says:

    Hey Melvis,

    There was a typo in my response. That should be the few responses I got.

    In any case I apologize if I offended anybody.

  24. highgloveside says:

    So many great players could be sitting there in the 6-8 range. Looking at the variety of lists, this could include Hughes, Bouchard, Dobson and possibly Thacuk or (fingers crossed) Walstrom. If one of these is available at 7, could their 10th and 40th move them up. Walstrom could be Connors Kurri and Hughes could be the new Coffey.

  25. PennersPancakes says:

    Professor Q,

    Agreed. Wonder if the Yakupov comparisons would still happen if Pulju was a good Canadian boy from Mississauga. I understand the concern about the player but don’t understand how some fans can write him off as done or basically already at his ceiling.

    He put up 20 points in 65 games with only 2 coming on the PP. Just turned 20 so this entire season he was 19. Did this while being all over the line up, possibly working through English/communication issues, and in my mind being defensively sound. This might be a player the organization has to be patient with (I’m expecting a good showing next season) but he is definitely a player.

  26. leadfarmer says:

    Melman:
    It’ll be interesting to see in 2 years if CBJ knew what it was doing on draft day when they surprised everyone.Is Dubois Ryan Johanson v2.0?

    They knew they really needed a center.

  27. russ99 says:

    Scungilli Slushy: Boy we sure see JP differently. Scoring is a question, I see no problems elsewhere other than he’s a really young NHLer.

    Yak marches to the beat of, well I’m not sure anyone knows what. I don’t see any similarities and JP is trying to cover the bet of 1OV. It’s only the top 3 that should be reasonably expected to reach draft potentials fully most years. And typically only top 2 see the NHL as young as JP.

    ** Not trying to cover the bet

    Yeah. But I can see a time when really young NHLer turns into how the Oilers mishandled his development.

    Kind of that whole throw players into a tough situation to see how they react and the cream rises to the top vs. the long game develop them in the minors first situation.

    The Oilers seem to treat their high forward picks the all same, when each player is different.

  28. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Rondo:
    Melman,

    The took a 2-way center over a winger.

    Also closer to NHL ready.

  29. Melvis says:

    Yak mishandled in Edmonton? He managed to stickhandle himself into a short sojourn in St. Louis. I suspect equally short in Colorado, come July 1. And after parting ways with Larionov, right into the KHL.

    Put another way, what’s he done for you lately? Like the last two years. Nada. Chances are, despite surface appearances of being a “nice guy”, or passionate about the game, or “just doing what the coaches tell me”.

    Under the surface…maybe, just maybe, he’s a pill sucking too much air out of too many rooms.

  30. Scungilli Slushy says:

    russ99: Yeah. But I can see a time when really young NHLer turns into how the Oilers mishandled his development.

    Kind of that whole throw players into a tough situation to see how they react and the cream rises to the top vs. the long game develop them in the minors first situation.

    The Oilers seem to treat their high forward picks the all same, when each player is different.

    That is the truth. He should have stayed home a year at least and come over more mature physically and mentally. I noticed once he seems to have traveled around a lot pursuing hockey. I think he left home at 14 or something. Where as Laine still lives with his mom in the Peg.

  31. CopaFrank says:

    Tim Raines was my favorite too!

  32. Westchester Oil says:

    Melman:
    It’ll be interesting to see in 2 years if CBJ knew what it was doing on draft day when they surprised everyone.Is Dubois Ryan Johanson v2.0?

    Outside of the World Juniors that year, the stats favoured Dubois over JP. PLD had an impressive NHLE with most of his points being primary points 5×5.

    That’s why I traded down a spot in my fantasy pool to take PLD over JP.

  33. Pink Socks says:

    The only reason JP is being compared to Yak is because they are not North American and both from “Europe”. And even then is not accurate. Yak is from Tatarstan (Asia), which for those familiar with the area, while it may be in Russian land and a majority speak the Russian language, is not Russian at all. Demographically and culturally it is much more similar to the old Soviet republics Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. So to call them comparable is just stupid. Just like #1 pick Dahlin is only compared to Lidstrom. I wonder why. Funny I haven’t seen him compared to Larry Murphy yet.

    Anyways, the only way Yak was mishandled in Edmonton was the coaching genius of Dallas Eakins, followed by zero effort given by the new coaching regime to “fix” him. Nelson of course had him on the right path but we all know how that turned out.

    So then the question leads into, if Yak plays under a Kreuger or a Nelson, how does his career look today. Vegas should sign him in the offseason. Seriously. Gallant is of the same ilk as Kreuger and Nelson.

    Milan Lucic has been rightfully ripped for his 2 year performance here. He has played for 3 coaches now in his career, Claude Julien, Daryl Sutter, and TMac. Did he suddenly begin shitting all over the ice when he came to Edmonton or could it have something to do with the coaching staff?

    Finally JP. How does JP’s career start if it is under Kreuger, Nelson, Julien, Sutter, or Gallant. It would be interesting to run some sort of matrix to see the average numbers of an individual player under a specific coach, and compare them to others. Of course there are many variables, but it could be a tool to identify, measurably, which coaches actually do get the most out of their players from a statistical standpoint.

    McDavid is going to put up 100 points under Dallas Eakins or Gerard Gallant. So he technically doesn’t matter. Leon the same, he likely does not vary much between coaches because of an elite skill level. But more focusing on the bottom 9 forwards, and when a player falls off a cliff (looking at Looch), is there something else that could be considered a cause.

    Secretly I’m hoping for some early season struggles, TMac’s firing, Nelson leaves Grand Rapids and is back where he should have been in October 2015. He fixes JP and Lucic and takes the team into the playoffs.

    *edit, sorry for the wall of text

  34. Bling says:

    Dubois and Puljujarvi are an interesting study in opportunity.

    Dubois was made CBJ’s de facto number 1 line center halfway through last season, and was playing with Panarin and Atkinson.

    Puljujarvi was sort of yanked all over the place, and even went from playing RW to LW. No PP time, either, despite probably having the best RH one timer on the team.

    Whatever your opinion is of the player, it’s an awfully perplexing way to bring up a young guy.

    JP’s end of season numbers were underwhelming, but mid season he was thriving 5v5. Then Todd cut his ice time. Bat shit crazy and bizarre, and I said so at the time.

    I’m hoping Gulutzan and Manny are able to connect with 98. He needs 15 minutes of ice a game and PP time.

  35. Bling says:

    Pink Socks,

    I agree with what you’re saying vis a vis developing young players, but Lucic is another story. He is done IMO.

    Todd Nelson/McLellan/Babcock/whoever can’t make him skate any faster, nor can they cure his case of the yips when he has the puck on his stick.

    If Gulutzan/Manny can convince Todd to start Lucic on the 4th line, the Oilers will be a much better team for it.

  36. Jaxon says:

    Scungilli Slushy: It’s not unreasonable, if it were my call I’d want a little more back. Normally moving up is costly.

    The Oilers need to be on the side of the ledger of teams that get good value for what they sell. The culture change is completed, there is no reason at all anywhere I can see to bleed anymore from PC or above.

    Adding a 1st or 2nd round close-to-ready prospect is pretty valuable with an expansion draft approaching. Plus, it allows them to address their holes sooner and take a bit more of a gamble at the draft table. If they add Mascherin they now have a prospect who could step in as early as this season on LW and possibly push Caggiula, Aberg and Lucic down (or eventually off) the depth chart. It would also make it ,more palatable to gamble at #15 on a RHD like Ryan Merkley, and get one of the first 3 picks in the second day of the draft when they have time to re-organize a list of 3 players to pick there. With all of the disparity in rankings this year I really believe there will be someone substantial available at #15.

    Plus, Mascherin won’t need to be protected and any other forward they acquire will take a protection spot away. Also, they already have 4 D that need to be protected, so that means they might be forced to go 4 forwards and 4 D, Russell (NMC), Nurse, Klefbom, Larsson and Lucic (NMC), McDavid, Draisaitl, and one of Puljujarvi or Nugent-Hopkins (they’d lose Puljujarvi or Nuge). Or, they protect 7&3 And lose one of Nurse, Klefbom or Larsson. Russell, Nurse, Larsson on D, and Lucic, McDavid, Draisaitl, Nugent-Hopkins, Puljujarvi, Strome, Khaira on forward, losing Klefbom. I see a Russell buyout coming, as I’m not sure he’s tradable even after his clauses change to Ltd NMC.

  37. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Bling:
    Dubois and Puljujarvi are an interesting study in opportunity.

    Dubois was made CBJ’s de facto number 1 line center halfway through last season, and was playing with Panarin and Atkinson.

    Puljujarvi was sort of yanked all over the place, and even went from playing RW to LW. No PP time, either, despite probably having the best RH one timer on the team.

    Whatever your opinion is of the player, it’s an awfully perplexing way to bring up a young guy.

    JP’s end of season numbers were underwhelming, but mid season he was thriving 5v5. Then Todd cut his ice time. Bat shit crazy and bizarre, and I said so at the time.

    I’m hoping Gulutzan and Manny are able to connect with 98. He needs 15 minutes of ice a game and PP time.

    I think it’s the mistake thing. McL was punishing guys for what he saw as issues. Maybe he has a mandate, or a timeline from upstairs. All young players (all players) make mistakes. Some coaches and teams let them play through them.

    Something went wrong when an entire team had trouble meeting assignments and finding confidence. Thus the house clearing. I also hope the message changes to “play the system and you get to make some miscues, play the game as well as you can”, like Gallant spoke about.

    And if they don’t want to play the system, like Vegas it’s down to the minors for some practice time or a smart trade.

  38. ArmchairGM says:

    Rafa Nadal: Sounds like Yakupov. Sigh. I’m hoping Pulju can prove me wrong, but I think he’ll show us that he doesn’t have what it takes to be a contributing NHLer.

    You don’t think he’s a “contributing NHLer” already?!

    Oilers forwards, 5v5 primary points per 60:

    1. McDavid 2.28
    2. Draisaitl 1.91
    3. Nugent-Hopkins 1.54
    4. Maroon 1.26
    5. Puljujarvi 1.18

    Notice something? Only ONE player from this list played a significant amount of bottom-6 minutes this season.

  39. John Chambers says:

    jake70: You know, the Oilers went scorched earth starting 2010, yet the only draft year where they had more than one pick in the first round was 2011,Nuge and Kleftbom.This has irritated me over the years as other teams (I didn’t check) going through the same thing seemed to pick up multiple first rounders along the way, not the Oilers. Just says how low quality the incumbents on those rosters were leading into and beyond 2010 or other GMs were trying to snooker the Oilers.Man.

    People hated it when they traded Penner, but at the time I felt they hadn’t gone far enough and should’ve traded Hemsky sooner to likewise acquire another first round pick.

    Now Hemmer was often injured, but watching Hall’s junior teammate Cam Fowler fall in the draft I thought “man if they could flip Hemsky for Fowler +” that’d be a great foundation for a re-build.

  40. deardylan says:

    LT, Who is the your current Tim Raines of hockey. Anyone that compares?

  41. bendelson says:

    Melvis: I tend to play the fool

    You are one of the lucky ones Melvis…
    Some of us don’t have any choice in the matter.

  42. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    If JP plays full time on 29’s wing and is on PP2, he’ll score over 50pts next year.

    If he’s on 29’s wing and PP1, I wouldn’t bet against 60.

    If he’s on 97’s wing and PP1 then 70 is possible.

  43. ArmchairGM says:

    Scungilli Slushy: Scoring is a question…

    Oilers forwards, 5v5 goals per 60:

    1. McDavid 1.34
    2. Maroon 0.91
    3. Nugent-Hopkins 0.77
    4. Puljujarvi 0.74
    5. Khaira 0.73
    6. Caggiula 0.70
    7. Draisaitl 0.69

    Puljujarvi isn’t the one I’m worried about on this list. Also, of the players on the above list only Khaira had worse zone start stats, 49.37 v 50.10.

  44. ArmchairGM says:

    slopitch:
    If we’re gonna bring up Filip Forsberg being the best player from 2012, its important to remember that at at age 19 he was developing slowly and traded for Marty Erat. Important season for JP for sure. But lots of time left for him to develop.

    Not my first choice but Id be fine with Ryan Merkley @10. Love his skill.

    Yeah, his vision and creativity are phenomenal too. He routinely makes plays that most of the higher ranked players wouldn’t even attempt. (We only see the ones that worked in the highlights, I can imagine many of them do not. Is this why he’s considered poor defensively?)

  45. ArmchairGM says:

    Stud Muffin: I’m not a fan Mascherin he’s small and isn’t a plus skater, that’s a bad combination.

    Pronman figures he’ll go in the 4th or 5th round if he reenters the draft. The Oilers could just pick him at #133 and keep the other picks.

  46. blainer says:

    Rafa Nadal: Sounds like Yakupov. Sigh. I’m hoping Pulju can prove me wrong, but I think he’ll show us that he doesn’t have what it takes to be a contributing NHLer.

    This is an unpopular opinion around here. It is a very familiar story with soo many people blaming Yak’s exit on his development coaching agent etc rather than on the player himself.

    I am of the opinion that Yak didn’t want it or work hard enough and looked disinterested at times out there. I also see the same things in JP. Very disappointing to say the least.

    This will be the season he either shows us he is the next Rantanen or he shows us he is the next Yak or lands somewhere in between ( Benoit Pouliot ). He must work his ass off in the off season on his shooting and fitness. He often changed too fast and looked both tired and disinterested out there last season.

    I guess Colombus saw this coming and is why they passed on JP. That and PLD was a center.

    This is of course just my opinion and the bulk of everyone here has their’s as well.

    I also hope JP proves me wrong in the same way I had hoped Yak would.

    Me .. I would insist JP and Koskinen come over in early August and train with CMD and company if possible.

  47. Oilman99 says:

    Scungilli Slushy: Boy we sure see JP differently. Scoring is a question, I see no problems elsewhere other than he’s a really young NHLer.

    Yak marches to the beat of, well I’m not sure anyone knows what. I don’t see any similarities and JP is trying to cover the bet of 1OV. It’s only the top 3 that should be reasonably expected to reach draft potentials fully most years. And typically only top 2 see the NHL as young as JP.

    ** Not trying to cover the bet

    The kid showed he can play with top talent when he was paired with Aho and Laine as a junior. Self confidence suffered last year. If he can become stronger,meaner, and get his shot off quicker,he could be one of the top six the team dearly needs. The problem is there are a lot ifs there yet that have not been answered. I would hope the team puts in the time to make sure he is ready come September.

  48. Harpers Hair says:

    Todd Nelson joining Dallas as an assistant coach.

  49. Jaxon says:

    Stud Muffin: I’m not a fan Mascherin he’s small and isn’t a plus skater, that’s a bad combination.

    Not sure small is an issue (5’10” 205 lbs) and he’s a good skater. There were 102 players who played in the NHL last seaosn who were 5’10” or shorter and all of them weighed less than 205 lbs.

    Players he’s bigger than: Mark Letestu, Ryan Callahan, Kris Russell, Matt Read, Andrew Cogliano, Vlad Sobotka, Matt Perrault, JT Brown, Zac Rinaldo, Tomas Tatar, Ryan Ellis, Sami Vatanen, Tyson Barrie, Ryan Spooner, Jaden Schwartz, Michael Granlund, JG Pageau, Jordan Weal, Vincent Trocheck, Dranke Caggiula, Max Domi, Tyler Motte, Will Butcher, Sebastian Aho, Brayden Point, Andrew Mangiapaine, Kevon Fiala, Travis Konecny, Klayton Keller, Jesper Bratt, Eeli Tolvanen and 50 other players smaller than these guys.

    Scouting Reports:

    “Prolific scoring winger who combines an exceedingly high work ethic with speed, skill, and a mature approach to the game to overcome size differentials. An intense competitor with a booming shot, Masherin finds ways to score by outworking the opposition. He may not be the tallest player on the ice, but he isn’t a lightweight either. He plays a fast, heavy game and isn’t afraid to battle against tougher opponents. All-in-all, a lightning rod kind of player who will exceed expectations and bring energy to the game with each shift. (Curtis Joe, EP 2015)”

    “May 2017 – Mascherin proved to be the offensive catalyst in Kitchener this season as he posted 35 goals and 100 points in 65 games, good for third in OHL scoring. Mascherin was an offensive force every time he was on the ice while showcasing his outstanding shot and speed. Although not the tallest player on the ice, Mascherin has the strength and work ethic to win battles against any opponent. ” – Dobber

    “March 2016 – At 5’10” it is easy to dismiss Mascherin as a “small player” and that is not entirely accurate. Yes he is short by pro hockey standards, but he is not small. He is 205 pounds and strong as an ox. He is built like a fire hydrant and has excellent skating ability. He has explosive acceleration and a high end top gear. Mascherin has a deadly shot, hard, quick and accurate and controls the puck well at top speed. His game is reminiscent of Phil Kessel, but stronger and not yet quite as gifted offensively. Peter Harling”

    “March 2018 – In the Western Conference side of annual OHL Coaches Poll, Mascherin won the Best Shot vote, and he also finished second in the Hardest Shot and Most Dangerous in the Goal Area categories. Jokke Nevalainen”

    “Built like a bowling ball and plays like a tank. Just keeps rampaging through the OHL, and his speed and offensive production are top-notch.”
    – Kyle Woodlief of Redline Report at USAToday.com”

  50. Pink Socks says:

    Bling:
    Pink Socks,

    I agree with what you’re saying vis a vis developing young players, but Lucic is another story. He is done IMO.

    Todd Nelson/McLellan/Babcock/whoever can’t make him skate any faster, nor can they cure his case of the yips when he has the puck on his stick.

    If Gulutzan/Manny can convince Todd to start Lucic on the 4th line, the Oilers will be a much better team for it.

    Lucic would be the real tell if another HC was brought in and he started putting 1.80 Pts/60 again. I think he still has more to give, but if he starts next season like he started this one, I’d go a step further and park him in the pressbox. I agree the coach isn’t a cure-all, but there is definitely some impact. In regards to Lucic, I strongly belief TMac has put a leash on him to control the crazy and this has taken his head out of it. If I am in Lucic’s shoes, I don’t care what the HC says, my career is on the line and I need to get back to my younger mindset.

    The part I disagree with is the second paragraph. The coach can help limit overall yips/60, and can help a player not skate faster, but play faster. Kreuger had Yak looking forward to a long career of success. Eakins killed it. Nelson revitalized it and here are the numbers:

    Primary Points per 60, under Nelson, Yak was at 1.35. Under Eakins? 0.68. He doubled. Some coaches have the innate ability to maximize their player’s statistical output. The team was better, and the individual players were better.

    Yak under TMac without 97 as his center was horrible. Hitchcock with probably the worst option for him. I hope he gets in the right situation this summer, still cheering like hell for him to find success.

  51. Pink Socks says:

    Harpers Hair:
    Todd Nelson joining Dallas as an assistant coach.

    Shit!

  52. leadfarmer says:

    So going back to the thread yesterday. I could not care less what kind of a slap shot a defensive prospect has. The way I look at d prospects its Defensive ability, skating/speed, passing skills. A great slap shot is something thats great if he has but does not matter if he doesnt. I would much rather have that defensive prospect focus on passing the puck and good placement of a wrist shot then letting it rip.
    One thing I would be interested in is having the prospects do multiple 60m runs to see how much fast twitch muscles they have and compare to skating. If they can run fast but cant skate then you have something to work with. If not then they will probably always be a subpar skater

  53. Yeti says:

    VOR:
    Hey Melvis,

    There was a typo in my response. That should be the few responses I got.

    In any case I apologize if I offended anybody.

    I think that you don’t realize that, given your impressive experience and knowledge, many posters are somewhat intimidated to engage with you. With the discussion on biomechanics, you set the bar pretty high from the get go for a non-technical audience, but then came over as rather dismissive and disappointed when people couldn’t or wouldn’t answer the test you had set for them (on your terms). At the end, you claimed that the few replies you got represented a lack of interest. I would respectfully suggest that the way you engaged people was always destined to put up barriers to getting replies. No-one wants to look foolish by getting something wrong – even on an anonymous blog – and your style of engagement on this one quite literally ruined the results you might have been hoping to glean.
    To be clear, I love your posts – fabulous stuff. But I think you were way off target on this last exchange.

  54. ArmchairGM says:

    Rondo:
    Professor Q,

    PLD is playing # 1 center in Columbus no hiding, JP could easily hide when he played with McDavid.

    McDavid’s most common winger’s 5v5 goal scoring per 60 (and total TOI together):

    Rattie 1.51 (159 mins)
    Puljujarvi 1.17 (257)
    Nugent-Hopkins 1.16 (207)
    Maroon 0.92 (523)
    Draisaitl 0.60 (498)
    Lucic 0.57 (419)

    Who’s hiding here? Hint: not JP.

  55. ArmchairGM says:

    Pink Socks:
    The only reason JP is being compared to Yak is because they are not North American and both from “Europe”.And even then is not accurate.Yak is from Tatarstan (Asia), which for those familiar with the area, while it may be in Russian land and a majority speak the Russian language, is not Russian at all.Demographically and culturally it is much more similar to the old Soviet republics Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.So to call them comparable is just stupid.Just like #1 pick Dahlin is only compared to Lidstrom.I wonder why.Funny I haven’t seen him compared to Larry Murphy yet.

    Tatarstan is west of the Urals, meaning it’s in Europe, not Asia. Just thought I’d point that out.

  56. Jaxon says:

    ArmchairGM: Pronman figures he’ll go in the 4th or 5th round if he reenters the draft. The Oilers could just pick him at #133 and keep the other picks.

    I haven’t seen him nail down where he thinks he’ll go (except he is ranked in his mid rounds picks). He does have him ranked at #45 however on his “draft board”

  57. Richard S.S. says:

    There was talk of Lucic squinting in games, as if he had vision issues, on a Bob Stauffer podcasts with Mark Spector on the 24th. Add that to a new baby, and the need to drop weight, we could see a new Lucic next season.

  58. ArmchairGM says:

    Jaxon: I haven’t seen him nail down where he thinks he’ll go (except he is ranked in his mid rounds picks). He does have him ranked at #45 however on his “draft board”

    “I could get Adam Mascherin (45) with a fourth or fifth-round pick.”

    https://theathletic.com/367378/2018/05/29/pronman-how-nhl-draft-boards-work/

    (subscription required)

  59. Scungilli Slushy says:

    One thing about JP I know I keep forgetting is that he has a surgery last summer and it interrupted his training. It’s a big thing for all players in terms of game fitness and once the season starts they eventually get better but it’s a big disadvantage for even vet players.

    I’m hoping with a good summer of training (he’s with Aho apparently who is a good NHL player so the right mindset and intensity), a year older the balls start falling in place for him.

    I also hope the Oilers are investing time this summer with these young players and not just checking in infrequently and assuming all is well. Maybe the new coaches will change this bad Oiler habit we’ve heard about too many times.

  60. Klima's_Bucket says:

    Woodguy v2.0,

    I’d like to see 97 with JP and solid two way guy.
    Then put Nuge with Drai to have 2 lines that can hopefully tilt the ice.
    Strome can anchor the 3rd line.

    Two lines going is better than only one that was going last year.

  61. deardylan says:

    I tried to read VOR initial postings yesterday and from what I saw it was a very technical question to those who understand bio-mechanics.

    Although I didn’t understand I looked up some of the terms and learned something new and found it interesting. That is why I come here to learn and be educated by those younger and older than me and who see the world from different colours of the same beach ball.

    Respect to those with Ph.D credentials and those with Ph.D of life experience or those blessed with both.

    We can be proud of what we have and humble enough to realize what we are missing. Play fullout with marvelous multiple intelligences (see Howard Gardiner), dramatic stats (see Rickithebear) AND stories (see Lowetide posts) to the game!

    Just don’t be boring or creating prose on Ambient or excessive Alcohol or hanging upside down at 3am working out your popliteal fossa at an obtuse angle. (thanks Dr.Google for the new biomechanics term)

    Oh Lord Its Hard to Be Humble When We Are Perfect Human Beings In Everyway.

    #VegasBabyAlltheWay

  62. dustrock says:

    Richard S.S.:
    There was talk of Lucic squinting in games, as if he had vision issues, on a Bob Stauffer podcasts with Mark Spector on the 24th.Add that to a new baby, and the need to drop weight, we could see a new Lucic next season.

    If he was having vision problems during the games and nothing was done about it, that’s pretty ridiculous for both Lucic and the team.

  63. Pink Socks says:

    ArmchairGM: Tatarstan is west of the Urals, meaning it’s in Europe, not Asia. Just thought I’d point that out.

    That was the point. I said they are both from Europe, and that the reason it wasn’t reallytrue was the demographic and culture in Tatarstan is of Asian decent.

    *edit – I see now. I should have put “Asian” in parenthesis instead of “Asia”. But thank you for the geography lesson.

  64. PennersPancakes says:

    leadfarmer,

    I don’t know enough about biomechanics to know how much transfers over but I would like to see that idea explored more even if its looking at other exercises to determine raw ability versus developed skill. Finding a prospect with some issues with their skating style/stride is much better in my mind than someone who is overall just slow because of physical limitations. Not that it would always pan out but still a great idea.

  65. deardylan says:

    dustrock: If he was having vision problems during the games and nothing was done about it, that’s pretty ridiculous for both Lucic and the team.

    Check out the book “Immunity to Change” and it won’t be so surprising. In the book he states that many humans when faced with a change (even one that will save their life in the long run- should as taking meds daily) won’t make it.

    Fear being closer to death or acknowledging getting older is avoiding.

    I procrastinated on letting my hair turn grey, on going to the gym, on getting my liver checked when I was an alcoholic, on going for a full physical every year, getting to the dentist, writing a living will and I am procrastinating right now writing this post when I have a deadline to update my resume and get a dream job.

    When is the last time you or I proactively went for a full health examination even when we knew something wasn’t right within us?

    “At the simplest level, any particular expression of the immunity to change provides us a picture of how we are systematically working against the very goal we genuinely want to achieve.”

    ― Robert Kegan, Immunity to Change: How to Overcome It and Unlock the Potential in Yourself and Your Organization

  66. PennersPancakes says:

    Richard S.S.,

    I remember joking around with friends he needs contacts. If something this crazy actually exists I would be ecstatic but also flabbergasted. It could be a multitude of things but the squinting, all the pucks grenading off his stick or through his skates, and not being able to hit those short tape to tape passes… Don’t mean to be insulting but maybe they’re right and he literally cant see.

  67. Spooky Lynx says:

    Re: Merkley

    He has the kind of skill where a team would do well to not only forgive his defensive liabilities, but actively change their strategy with him on the ice. He’s not really a defenseman, he’s not a forward, he’s a rover. Or as the Sharks put it with Brent Burns earlier this year, he’s a “hockey player”.

    Put him on the ice with a forward line consisting of two high-skill players and one exceptionally defensive minded player, along with a stay at home dman, and you’re cooking with rocket fuel.

  68. blainer says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    If JP plays full time on 29’s wing and is on PP2, he’ll score over 50pts next year.

    If he’s on 29’s wing and PP1, I wouldn’t bet against 60.

    If he’s on 97’s wing and PP1 then 70 is possible.

    Wow WG .. I probably respect your posts more than anybody on this blog and if you feel this way it gives more optimism for sure.

    I also agree JP has to play with better line mates if he is to break out this year. He really does need to put the work in during the off season though IMO.

  69. Leroy Draisdale says:

    PennersPancakes,

    I’m not positive, but I seem to remember a shot of him on the bench putting a contact in. Maybe he needs an updated prescription.

  70. Richard S.S. says:

    For a Rookie to make the Team out of spring, an organization sees something special in him. Every player that gets “the nine games” should get a list of things to work on when they are sent down. After twenty to twenty-five games, re-evaluate the Player. If good progress has been made, bring the Player up for another “nine”. (Do not bring the Player up until good progress has been made.). If it is needed to send the Player down again, give him another list to work on. After another twenty to twenty-five games, re-evaluate the Player. He can either be brought up to stay, or will be given instructions for the Offseason. At some point and time, the decision whether he stays or gets traded gets made.

    The Oilers need to work on getting a steady stream of top 6 forwards, top three defenseman feeding the Team. They need to draft very well, acquire top tier talent whenever possible and be ruthless about who they keep. Bottom four Defense and bottom six Forwards should work cheap. The Oilers are slowly getting there and without major upheaval that should slowly continue to get better.

  71. OriginalPouzar says:

    For me, its clear to slot JP with Drai and work with 3 pairs:

    Nuge/McDavid
    Drai/Jesse
    Kharia/Strome

    Of course, this means we need to acquire a 4C but we should be able for get a cheap 4C in free agency and, if Khaira is able to solidify a middle 6 LW spot, we’ve filled a huge hole internally with a value contract.

  72. blainer says:

    When it comes to Lucic I don’t really know what he can do to catch up to the speed of the game. I don’t know the stats for give aways’s per 60 last year but I would expect he was one of the worst in the league.

    IMO Lucic has become too slow. I’m not sure if it’s his skating as at times he looks fast enough but his decision making is just way tooo slow and way off. He needs to move the puck faster without giving it away.

    He seemed to panic with the puck at every turn last season. One would think that he hasn’t just forgotten how to play on the big stage.

    I would hope he comes to camp knowing that his career after last year is in trouble as he will be in the press box a lot if he plays the way he did last season.

    I do think he has the skill and work ethic to rebound and here’s hoping he does as a hot Lucic will go a long way to our securing a playoff spot.

  73. OriginalPouzar says:

    I see JP with a solid 25/25 – 50 season if allowed to play material minutes with Drai.

  74. hunter1909 says:

    russ99: McLellan did well making him earn more playing time last year

    McLellan seemed keen to demote JP which he did;

    JP needs a good set up man like the Doctor.

    McDavid doesn’t need anyone.

    Someone needs to decide Lucic’s line number – if I were using last season as a bench mark he starts 2018-19 on the 4th line with fast track way up to the 3rd line lol

  75. OriginalPouzar says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    If JP plays full time on 29’s wing and is on PP2, he’ll score over 50pts next year.

    If he’s on 29’s wing and PP1, I wouldn’t bet against 60.

    If he’s on 97’s wing and PP1 then 70 is possible.

    Yes, I would have him with 29 and given, at least, PP2 time (if not PP1 time) and I foresee a 25/25 season as a bottom.

    I would also now “expect it” – its time for a material step forward in the last year of his ELC (assuming solid usage/deployment).

  76. hunter1909 says:

    Should Lucic actually show up for any games, say in the 1st period you also need a plan to jump him up to the top 6.

  77. hunter1909 says:

    blainer: I would hope he comes to camp knowing that his career after last year is in trouble as he will be in the press box a lot if he plays the way he did last season.
    I do think he has the skill and work ethic to rebound and here’s hoping he does as a hot Lucic will go a long way to our securing a playoff spot.

    It was a lot more than just Lucic that skewered the season.

    Pretty well the whole team was playing poorly. Until #97 stepped up and bitch slapped the field to canter to the Art Ross Trophy.

  78. Andy Dufresne says:

    Nick Ellis retires.

  79. Seismic Source says:

    I grew up a huge expos fan. Raines was amazing. True pain is being an Expos fan.

    That 87 season where the league colluded against the FAs that resulted in Dawson signing a cheaper contract with the cubs out of spite and Raines not signing until May 1st. The Expos were 2 games out of last place at the time. Raines’ first game back he hit a triple and a grand slam and the team went 83-58 the rest of the way but finished just a few games shy of the playoffs…..any kids out there wanna guess who won the NL MVP that year? I’m glad there was no internet then. That hurt almost as much as 94….almost.

  80. hunter1909 says:

    deardylan: When is the last time you or I proactively went for a full health examination even when we knew something wasn’t right within us?

    Never.

    deardylan: “At the simplest level, any particular expression of the immunity to change provides us a picture of how we are systematically working against the very goal we genuinely want to achieve.”
    ― Robert Kegan

    With respect, am steering clear of anyone associated with the Oilers with anything likely to be a variation of “Kevin Lowe”. “Kegan” is too close to Kevin lol

  81. Andy Dufresne says:

    Listening to, paraphrasing and reading between the lines of Bob Stauffer

    Sounds like Oilers will make the pick at 10….Bob doesnt think Evan Bouchard will be there at 10 ….then goes on to talk about how he was high on Ryan Ellis in 2009 (he went 1 pick later than MPS) …. smaller skilled offensive defensmen and then he goes on to mention……………….Ty Smith.

    Im hoping Ty Smith is a decoy for the other target at 10 (if Bouchard is gone)……Boqvist……

    …Adam to Adam to Conner…..

  82. ArmchairGM says:

    Pink Socks: That was the point.I said they are both from Europe, and that the reason it wasn’t reallytrue was the demographic and culture in Tatarstan is of Asian decent.

    *edit – I see now.I should have put “Asian” in parenthesis instead of “Asia”.But thank you for the geography lesson.

    Interesting to hear about the culture in the place because I have very little knowledge of Russia in general.

  83. OriginalPouzar says:

    Andy Dufresne:
    Nick Ellis retires.

    It seems he announced his retirement via Instagram and will be pursing a career in education and coaching.

    This opens up the door for both Wells and Skinner to turn pro this off season.

    Still we be interesting to see if they bring Brossoit back (if LB even wants to come back, he’s a UFA).

  84. ArmchairGM says:

    Andy Dufresne:
    Nick Ellis retires.

    Shocking. But I suppose he doesn’t see a future in being a career ECHL goaler…

  85. Andy Dufresne says:

    OriginalPouzar: Yes, I would have him with 29 and given, at least, PP2 time (if not PP1 time) and I foresee a 25/25 season as a bottom.

    I would also now “expect it” – its time for a material step forward in the last year of his ELC (assuming solid usage/deployment).

    That a pretty high FLOOR for a Bandi player………IMO…If he “earns” 2nd line time, then wins the 2LW spot and the PP2……his ceiling is 25/25 next year. I’d be VERY happy to see a 20/20 season.
    .
    Long term, a see a Jere Lehtinen type player, solid two-way forward who can score averaging 50 points a season.

    But as Woodguy points out…..if he can play his way on to McDavids line then use the McDavid quotient…..50pts x 1.5 = 75pts upside.

    Great skater, Good Hockey IQ, needs to work on his shot and the physical side of his game.

  86. Andy Dufresne says:

    MPS signs a one year deal with Ottawa……. $900k

  87. Andy Dufresne says:

    OriginalPouzar: It seems he announced his retirement via Instagram and will be pursing a career in education and coaching.

    This opens up the door for both Wells and Skinner to turn pro this off season.

    Still we be interesting to see if they bring Brossoit back (if LB even wants to come back, he’s a UFA).

    Id like to see Brossoit back for another year. He just turned 25 two months ago. To early to write him off.

    So with Ellis gone and Montoya likely moving….what else has to happen to make room for Brossoit?

  88. Pink Socks says:

    Andy Dufresne:
    Nick Ellis retires.

    Pretty unreal. If PC finds a home for Montoya he almost has to give Brossoit another year doesnt he? Can’t go into next season with Starret and Wells / Skinner splitting the net can they?

  89. ArmchairGM says:

    Andy Dufresne: That a pretty high FLOOR for a Bandi player………IMO…If he “earns” 2nd line time, then wins the 2LW spot and the PP2……his ceiling is 25/25 next year. I’d be VERY happy to see a 20/20 season.
    .
    Long term, a see a Jere Lehtinen type player, solid two-way forward who can score averaging 50 points a season.

    But as Woodguy points out…..if he can play his way on to McDavids line then use the McDavid quotient…..50pts x 1.5 = 75pts upside.

    Great skater, Good Hockey IQ, needs to work on his shot and the physical side of his game.

    Based on his play in 2017-18, Puljujarvi as Draisaitl’s full time RW could produce 40 points just in 5v5 play alone.

    http://naturalstattrick.com/playerreport.php?season=20172018&stype=2&sit=5v5&stdoi=std&rate=n&v=t&playerid=8479344

  90. Andy Dufresne says:

    Lucic to me is a stop and go player. One of several things needs to happen.

    He needs to lose weight and learn how to keep his feet moving continuously. Not Likely.

    He needs to lose weight and get up for EVERY game. The talk has always been “dont wake him up” He needs to learn to wake himself up for every game. Not Likely.

    Coaches need to “get as much as possible” out of him for the next year or two. He comes in lighter, he improves his foot speed and energy level, he improves his zone exits, coaches game plan for him to be Net-Front screening goalie, and banging in rebounds.

  91. VOR says:

    stephensheps,

    Biomechanics is where engineering science meets living systems. That is a bit misleading so I like to offer some idea of the range of subjects biomechanics deals with. Want to improve your golf swing and make it better – biomechanics. Want to help a quadriplegic walk again – biomechanics.

    So let me break my original question down into smaller parts. For this post lets just deal with one aspect of slapping the puck.

    What do your shoulders do during a slap shot?

    I am a goaltender but some of my happiest memories are of slapping the puck in my basement, after practice, on the local creek or at an outdoor rink in a friends back yard. I can’t be alone in this. So I am assuming you can all visualize in your head what it feels like to slap a puck. Now focus on what it feels like in your shouder.

    The shoulder is the most complex joint in the human body. It is actually four joints. And I am sorry there is no common name for three of the four joints that make up the so called shoulder joint.

    The first three joints I am going to list aren’t particularly involved in the slap shot motion beyond stabilizing the entire joint complex.

    They are the sternoclavicular joint, the scapulothoracic joint, and the acromioclavicular joint. These joints sometimes fail or become arthritic for want of a better word. But most of what we think of when we say shoulder joint is the glenohumeral joint and the muscles that surround and under lay it which are known as the rotator cuff.

    The glenohumeral joint is where the humerus meets the glenoid process. This is a classic ball and socket joint with the head of the humerus inserted into a capsule. When the humerus (the upper arm bone) pops out of that capsule we say the shoulder is dislocated. Putting it back in hurts like hell, well for the person having it put back in.

    Shoulder damage is sadly common in hockey players though usually it occurs as a result of a check to the shoulder, a check thrown with the shoulder, or falling, particularly into the bones. Actually our shoulder joint is quite fragile and there are many diseases and injuries that can turn our shoulders into sources of immense agony. Big slap shot artists often have shoulder problems throughout their careers and shoulder surgery is common.

    The glenohumeral joint allows a wide range of arm movements in different planes.

    Abduction is any motion away from the midline of the body. Adduction is motion towards the midline.

    It used to be thought that all abduction of the shoulder was initiated by the supraspinatus muscle. This is a quite small muscle (one of the four that make up the rotator cuff) that attaches your shoulder blade (scapula) with the upper arm bone (humerus). Now we know all the muscles of the rotator cuff initiate at almost identical times in abduction. Very interestingly we know that they all fire before a conscious decision is acknowledged to fire a slap shot. Your body decides on a slap shot before it lets your mind in on the plan.

    The reason I mention the supraspinatus is that it more or less effectively sets a limit to the range of possible abduction. For the sort of motion you would use to shoot a slap shot the maximum abduction has been found to be about 39 degrees. We will come back to this. Note please, there are huge exceptions in certain sports.

    Now how do we measure that range. We visualize the plane of interest. In this case the scapular plane – that plane running from your spine out through your shoulder blade to the outside world. Now with a digitized image we place a protractor over the image at 90 degrees to the plane of interest. I assume we all remember protractors from school. Well this one is actually more of a grid and the one I use was actually developed to help orthopedic surgeons read joint x-rays pre and post surgery (they are used extensively in surgical wards all over the world).

    If we say that a shoulder joint is abducted 30 degrees from the scapular plane then on the protractor it has moved 30 degrees off the center line of the protractor and away from the body’s midline (in this case as determined by the scapula).

    Al Iafrate, Sheldon Souray, and Shea Weber have all been found to be abducting between 33 and 35 degrees (the amount of abduction varies for each player so you can get an average but the range may be more interesting for some applications.

    For Keiffer Bellows who averages 30 degrees the range is from 34 to 28 degrees. You can see you might want to get him so he is always up in the 34 range turning him into a forward with a Shea Weber cannon.

    (By the way I have been using Keiffer for a research project I am doing which is why I can tell you a great deal about his biomechanics. I am not picking on the kid. I just needed somebody with a big shot where there was lots of film I could get my hands on to analyze.)

    Now sadly just increasing the degree of abduction doesn’t guarantee a harder shot. Though perhaps we should say faster shot.

    In fact, a slap shot is immensely complicated and a lot of things may figure into just the shoulder part of the motion. You could have a shooter with lousy abduction and very strong rotator cuff muscles (and yes these muscles can be trained). For that matter you can increase the range of abduction considerably in most people. There is a correlation between how strong the rotator cuff is and how fast you can accelerate a hockey stick.

    But of course the length of the stick matters as does the length of the arms. The longer the lever arm the faster the end of that lever is moving for any given torque on the lever. And some people have more powerful rotator cuff muscles. That is they can move their shoulder joint faster than other people. Again this can be trained.

    Next there is what happens to the shoulder (among other parts of the body) when the stick hits the ice. I assume we all know that in a slap shot the stick will typically hit the ice several inches behind the puck giving it time to bend before it hits the puck. Your shoulder needs to push through the motion. That is you can’t stop driving simply because you have hit ice. This is your chance to torque the stick and further improve the lever mechanics. This is hard to do if you haven’t hit on the heel of the stick.

    Then there is the importance of the back swing and the follow through. Abduction (particularly abduction in the scapular plane) isn’t actually the only factor in the length of your back swing. And generally the longer the back swing the faster the stick will be moving when it meets the puck.

    Now considering all that lets look at some pictures that show the entire range of motion involved. This great paper doesn’t talk about the muscles involved but does give you an idea of how the shoulder works with the rest of the body. Just realize for each step there are muscles that can be trained and flexibility that can be increased and speed that can be improved.

    https://umanitoba.ca/faculties/kinrec/hlhpri/media/Slapshotchecklist.pdf

    Hockey teams by and large remain uninterested in deploying biomechanical knowledge and training to improve this (or other skills). They leave it up to the the player to find a shooting coach, or a skating coach, etc. They place the responsibility on guys like Adam Oates. Why is beyond me.

    The irony is many CIAU college coaches let their colleagues in biomechanics, kinesiology, and physiology, use the University team as study subjects, meaning often CIAU players know far more about the biomechanics of hockey than NHL pros.

    It is my fundamental contention that as hockey coaching is more and more informed by biomechanics teams will have specialized coaches who work relentlessly on maximizing these skills throughout the players careers. Increasing flexibility is now a well established trend in pro hockey but you can see from this simple example, there is probably merit in focusing even more attention on flexibility in the hips and shoulders. More importantly, and to really prove this to you I would have to go through each muscle group involved in each skill involved in hockey, strength training needs to be much more focused on skill improvement. By the way many amateur sports actually have tables of – have an athlete with this biomechanical weakness use this exercise/teaching technique and tables of all the muscles involved in each skill/motion.

    Biomechanics can actually provide answers to many fascinating questions, like why some players can one time the puck and others can’t. Or at least not without a huge amount of remedial training. And what that remedial training should look like. Or how you go from being good at one timing the puck to great at one timing the puck. Or which player is the better skater (in biomechanics we talk about the dimensions of skating).

  92. ArmchairGM says:

    Interesting note: with Auvitu on the ice 5v5, Puljujarvi scored at 6.75 points-per-60!! Connor, move over!

  93. Professor Q says:

    PennersPancakes:
    Richard S.S.,

    I remember joking around with friends he needs contacts. If something this crazy actually exists I would be ecstatic but also flabbergasted. It could be a multitude of things but the squinting, all the pucks grenading off his stick or through his skates, and not being able to hit those short tape to tapepasses… Don’t mean to be insulting but maybe they’re right and he literally cant see.

    He used to wear contacts in Boston but got LasikMD surgery and said that it allowed him to play better, due to seeing the ice and puck more clearly.

  94. godot10 says:

    Andy Dufresne:
    MPS signs a one year deal with Ottawa……. $900k

    Peter Chiarelli didn’t bother offering Tyler Pitlick this contract last May. #FAIL

  95. Andy Dufresne says:

    ArmchairGM: Based on his play in 2017-18, Puljujarvi as Draisaitl’s full time RW could produce 40 points just in 5v5 play alone.

    http://naturalstattrick.com/playerreport.php?season=20172018&stype=2&sit=5v5&stdoi=std&rate=n&v=t&playerid=8479344

    Its 4 pts in 102 minutes …………….but I get your point.

    Like most young players its finding consistency that is the biggest hurdle…..I hope you are right ….it is encouraging…..

  96. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    dustrock: If he was having vision problems during the games and nothing was done about it, that’s pretty ridiculous for both Lucic and the team.

    Watching the Oilers caused me to drink until I had double vision last year so I understand the vision problem thing. If there was ever a question.

  97. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM:
    Interesting note: with Auvitu on the ice 5v5, Puljujarvi scored at 6.75 points-per-60!! Connor, move over!

    In 80 minutes at 5 on 5 they were on the ice for 12 goals for and 1 against – a 92.3% goal differential

  98. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Andy Dufresne:
    Nick Ellis retires.

    The prospects pipeline has sprung a few leaks lately.

  99. OriginalPouzar says:

    Tyler Pitlick scored one more goal last season than Drake Caggulia who, from what I read, is not an NHLer.

  100. Scungilli Slushy says:

    OriginalPouzar: In 80 minutes at 5 on 5 they were on the ice for 12 goals for and 1 against – a 92.3% goal differential

    For normal players I simply hope they are defensively reliable hardworking outscorers. If JP can play toughs, outscore and is a 50pt player, golden. If he’s a 70-80 pt outscorer he’s a league best winger, and could price himself or someone else off the team.

    The team has it’s elite forwards, I want some solid, offensively capable middle types that can play with the elites 6 so there can be serious depth.

    For Connor who isn’t normal I’d like him to score 160 pts.

  101. Pink Socks says:

    ArmchairGM: Interesting to hear about the culture in the place because I have very little knowledge of Russia in general.

    I am over there at least once a year and have spent some time in Kazakhstan, and many trips to Kyrgyzstan to visit family. In Kazan, the largest city in Tatarstan, my wife has an old friend from grade school. When we have some extra time we always travel into Kazan for a few days. There the population is about 50/50 Tatar and Russian and seems to be more “Tatar” each time we travel. The further outside the big cities and into the villages, it is exclusively a Tatar population. Tatarstan and the rest of the “Stan’s” to the southeast are all majority Muslim populations, but regardless of the practiced religions, are all extremely family oriented and very few materialistic attitudes. There are no clashes between Muslims and Orthodox and atheists. It is a very calm and kind way of life, but also very poor in the villages. It seems that virtually every family would have one member that desired something different and a life full of busyness, so they would gather their possessions and move to Moscow. From there they send money back to the family and support them. This is very different from the western portion of Russia, in Moscow especially, but even in the small and forgotten villages. I assume Western Russia is much more similar to Finland, though I’d be willing to wager money that the Finn’s are much, much friendlier than the Russians.

  102. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    blainer: Wow WG .. I probably respect your posts more than anybody on this blog and if you feel this way it gives more optimism for sure.

    I also agree JP has to play with better line mates if he is to break out this year. He really does need to put the work in during the off season though IMO.

    Thank you sir.

    4 things lead me to this:

    1) Who you play with matters a ton for all players, and especially young ones. JP and EDM’s scoring rates were fine when he was in the top 6

    2) As mentioned earlier he was coming off summer surgery and probably didn’t have a great summer to train

    3) He’s a kid and in his exit interview it sounds likes he has finally figured out what level of fitness he needs to have to succeed in the NHL for 82 games

    4) Once a player is drafted everyone should forget their draft year and focus on their age. It’s funny, one of the things that Cory Proman said that he needed to learn about projecting kids was paying more attention to late and early birthdays because you need to project them differently.

    JP age-wise last year was the same as Drai’s 1st year where he got 9pts in 37 games.

    Both were 19 during those respective years.

    Age matters a ton and next year is usually when players like Jesse have their “break out’ year and if the coach doesn’t fuck it JP should do very well.

  103. Lois Lowe says:

    I apparently stopped in on a day where Yak, Nelson, and Eakins are still topics of discussion. I am heartened that some things never change.

  104. stephen sheps says:

    VOR,

    First off, thanks so much for this reply and for including that link. Just being able to visualize the various components of the shoulder and then visualize the angles necessary for shooting the puck (I too was a goalie and when I played out, I was a stay at home D of the Kris Russell variety – by which I mean not very good, undersized but fearless – so I didn’t shoot the puck much or very well when I got my chances. To be fair, this was also Jewish league in my teens so take that for what it’s worth – the quality of play was exceptionally bad).

    Anyhoo, I have been struggling with a long-term shoulder injury that has impacted my ability to rock climb and weight train, and my athletic therapist and I have been trying a whole host of different stretches and movements to try and alleviate the pain. I don’t think it’s fixable without surgery, but it’s also not serious enough to even get it looked at… yet… even just having these terms and thought process around things like angles and abduction may allow me to ask better questions of both my trainer and my athletic therapist. Thanks!

    This kind of analysis is something that I often hear about when I go to sport sociology conferences. Many of the attendees are kinesiologists or PE instructors/coaches at the university level and just having had a look at the conference program for this year’s event, there are a few sessions where a discussion on biomechanics & elite athletes may happen. Now I’m even more excited for next week!

    I can also see the promise of this type of analysis for hockey specifically. I’m going to need to keep reading, which given that it’s now conference and writing season I don’t have much time for, but this is a fascinating way of looking at the sport.

  105. OriginalPouzar says:

    Pink Socks: I am over there at least once a year and have spent some time in Kazakhstan, and many trips to Kyrgyzstan to visit family.In Kazan, the largest city in Tatarstan, my wife has an old friend from grade school.When we have some extra time we always travel into Kazan for a few days.There the population is about 50/50 Tatar and Russian and seems to be more “Tatar” each time we travel. The further outside the big cities and into the villages, it is exclusively a Tatar population.Tatarstan and the rest of the “Stan’s” to the southeast are all majority Muslim populations, but regardless of the practiced religions, are all extremely family oriented and very few materialistic attitudes.There are no clashes between Muslims and Orthodox and atheists.It is a very calm and kind way of life, but also very poor in the villages.It seems that virtually every family would have one member that desired something different and a life full of busyness, so they would gather their possessions and move to Moscow.From there they send money back to the family and support them.This is very different from the western portion of Russia, in Moscow especially, but even in the small and forgotten villages.I assume Western Russia is much more similar to Finland, though I’d be willing to wager money that the Finn’s are much, much friendlier than the Russians.

    Good info – i may pick your brain at some point as my wife is interested in doing a trip through “the Stans” – Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikstan, etc.

    Its going to be a little while though – we’ve got the southern coast of Sri Lanka this Christmas and Rawanda/Uganda/DRC next spring and need to work an Israel trip in soon (and SE Asia) – sigh, so many places to go….

  106. Pink Socks says:

    OriginalPouzar: In 80 minutes at 5 on 5 they were on the ice for 12 goals for and 1 against – a 92.3% goal differential

    OV2’s usage was pretty frustrating. He seemed to do good things even though he isn’t much of a defensive stalwart. Most frustrating, 13:52 of PP time. All season. Jussi Jokinen? Yes 16:16.

  107. OriginalPouzar says:

    Yes, given his skill-set and the PP’s lack of success, Auvitu’s lack of usage on the PP was tough to understand. My guess for the coach’s thought-process is that he didn’t trust him as the “1” in a 1-4 PP set-up.

  108. crabman says:

    For me Puljujarvi’s biggest issue earlier in the year was his need to carry the puck and force things offensively even when he was on the ice with better puck carriers like McDavid and Draisaitl. He seemed to be trying to do too much and forced a lot of plays and turned the puck over as a result.
    Once he was paired with Strome at the end of the year he seemed to be much more of a north south player and just getting into a good position to shoot allowing Strome to do the heavy lifting. I know the scoring results weren’t as good as with McDavid and Draisaitl but Strome isn’t on their skill level either. It looked to me like Puljujarvi’s game was maturing and I would like to see him play this style in the top6. McDavid and Draisaitl are both great at carrying the puck into the zone and finding the open man. If Puljujarvi can let them do their job and just work on getting open he could have much more success than his 1st 2 seasons.

  109. Pink Socks says:

    OriginalPouzar: Good info – i may pick your brain at some point as my wife is interested in doing a trip through “the Stans” – Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikstan, etc.

    Its going to be a little while though – we’ve got the southern coast of Sri Lanka this Christmas and Rawanda/Uganda/DRC next spring and need to work an Israel trip in soon (and SE Asia) – sigh, so many places to go….

    Definitely anytime, it is well worth the trip. It sounds like a great upcoming 12 months. In Israel a few years ago my wife and I stayed in Bat Yam instead of Tel Aviv since they had a high Russian & Georgian population and made communication significantly easier. In Bat Yam, right next to the Leonardo Hotel, there is a restaurant Khachapuri House. A mix of Gerogian wines and beers and Khachapuri to die for.

  110. crabman says:

    as far as the draft is concerned do you think there is a player that could fall to 10 that the Flyers would be willing to move the 14 and 19 picks for? either straight up or as the center pieces of a bigger trade? There should still be a lot of skill left in the 14-20 range and it might be better to grab 2 for 1 in the top 20 if possible. Farabee at 14 and then a skilled D at 19 would be a great 1st round to me.

  111. leadfarmer says:

    Pink Socks,

    One of my best friends is doing 2 year Peace Corps in Georgia. Loves it. People are great. Wine is good and so is food. No tourists.

  112. Biggus Dickus says:

    I know there has bee a push back in the NFL about forcing perfect form on quarterbacks, as some guys can huck it better with what is historically considered good form. Some elite golf coaches are also becoming less sticklery about things that don’t really matter. And who can forget Chad Bradford? Point is I think analyzing biomechanics so intensely is putting the cart before the horse. Especially in a scouting context.

  113. Pink Socks says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Yes, given his skill-set and the PP’s lack of success, Auvitu’s lack of usage on the PP was tough to understand.My guess for the coach’s thought-process is that he didn’t trust him as the “1” in a 1-4 PP set-up.

    Yes I agree the trust issue was the big item. I wish there was more of a rolling of the dice considering the end result of that PP. Even then, he could have tried a 2-3 PP with Nurse so there were some extra wheels coming back.

  114. Pink Socks says:

    leadfarmer:
    Pink Socks,

    One of my best friends is doing 2 year Peace Corps in Georgia.Loves it.People are great.Wine is good and so is food.No tourists.

    It is a shame there is not more tourism in Georgia. I have never been but always make a point to visit some of the pockets of Georgian people in other nations. Like you said, the people and food are great, and the wine is some of the best in the world.

  115. leadfarmer says:

    VOR,

    Booo. Scapulothoracic joint. Not a real joint. Begone with your sorcery.

    Jk.

    But I wonder if thats were those players are used to having their stick or if it actually makes a difference if they overswing or underswing.

  116. OriginalPouzar says:

    Pink Socks: Definitely anytime, it is well worth the trip.It sounds like a great upcoming 12 months.In Israel a few years ago my wife and I stayed in Bat Yam instead of Tel Aviv since they had a high Russian & Georgian population and made communication significantly easier.In Bat Yam, right next to the Leonardo Hotel, there is a restaurant Khachapuri House.A mix of Gerogian wines and beers and Khachapuri to die for.

    Last time (only time) I was in Israel was in 1999 during a 3-month backpacking trip through Europe and part of the middle east. Dorm room hostels were the norm.

    Will be a bit of a different trip this coming time with a bit of a difference in expendable funds.

  117. leadfarmer says:

    Pink Socks,

    Unfortunately you need money to build the infrastructure to appeal to western tourists so they bring their money to spend. Having your own crazy alphabet does not help any but at least now they have apps so you can at least figure out where to go and how to get there in English. And how to survive a Marshrutka which would probably scare most tourists that haven’t travelled outside of western Europe and North America

  118. Scungilli Slushy says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Tyler Pitlick scored one more goal last season than Drake Caggulia who, from what I read, is not an NHLer.

    Pitlick
    GF% 57.81
    FF% 50.33
    ReITGF/60 .27
    Cags
    GF% 40.30
    FF% 47.29
    ReITGF/60 -.51

    Cags is still struggling to keep head above water.

  119. godot10 says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Tyler Pitlick scored one more goal last season than Drake Caggulia who, from what I read, is not an NHLer.

    It is the goals against while he is on the ice that damns Caggiula. #NotAnNHLPlayer

  120. digger50 says:

    Pink Socks: Lucic would be the real tell if another HC was brought in and he started putting 1.80 Pts/60 again.I think he still has more to give, but if he starts next season like he started this one, I’d go a step further and park him in the pressbox.I agree the coach isn’t a cure-all, but there is definitely some impact.In regards to Lucic, I strongly belief TMac has put a leash on him to control the crazy and this has taken his head out of it.If I am in Lucic’s shoes, I don’t care what the HC says, my career is on the line and I need to get back to my younger mindset.

    The part I disagree with is the second paragraph.The coach can help limit overall yips/60, and can help a player not skate faster, but play faster.Kreuger had Yak looking forward to a long career of success.Eakins killed it.Nelson revitalized it and here are the numbers:

    Primary Points per 60, under Nelson, Yak was at 1.35.Under Eakins?0.68.He doubled.Some coaches have the innate ability to maximize their player’s statistical output.The team was better, and the individual players were better.

    Absolutely Tmac had a leash on Milan, Maroon and Kassian. He does not value what they bring. He has no use for it, doesn’t know how to harness or use it.

    There was something wrong with this team last year and I for one am looking at the coach. Yes, Peter didn’t give him enough, but to deliver that season with a roster many felt would compete??

    When Tmac arrived he had the attitude that he would crack the whip on these bunch of losers, they just need to learn about winning. Tmac found out that when you are that deep in the hole its easy to be dragged down rather than drag everybody up. He insinuated that he’d move out everybody in order for the culture to change. ( Remember my Lion story) Now who is left? Nuge and Tmac, and they are still bottom of the league. What lessons is Tmac pondering this off season?

    I ramble because I believe his unwillingness to adapt his belief system, his thoughts, his preconceived notions on players, had a negative impact on performance.

    Back to Lucic, Maroon, Kassian. Regardless of the new NHL, these player types have been important for Edmonton. There is no way to get out from under the Rodney Dangerfield reputation without this player type, that’s a fact. I do believe Tmac view of their game and their personal strengths affected their performance. I seen few players comfortable in their role all season. I seen many players uncomfortable, playing not to fuck up was their only goal.

    With few roster changes likely this off season our biggest chance for improvement is going to come back to coaching. I didn’t like keeping Tmac but hopefully the belief in him is founded. I do like the other coaches brought in. Biggest move this off season, huge change is needed.

  121. Leroy Draisdale says:

    Pink Socks,

    I thought about a third of the way into the season that they should have tried Nuge’s unit first. They seemed to be getting the better chances when they were on the ice.

  122. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Tyler Pitlick scored one more goal last season than Drake Caggulia who, from what I read, is not an NHLer.

    Pitlick played on the best checking line in hockey with Radek Faska.

    They posted 50% CF and 65%GF playing the toughest comp.

    Caggiula dragged the best player on earth to 45%CF and 39%GF (!!)

    Other than scoring close to the same amount of goals and both paying forward in the NHL I don’t think they have much else in common.

  123. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Lois Lowe:
    I apparently stopped in on a day where Yak, Nelson, and Eakins are still topics of discussion. I am heartened that some things never change.

    Post more dammit!

    You are missed.

  124. Side says:

    digger50: Absolutely Tmac had a leash on Milan, Maroon and Kassian. He does not value what they bring. He has no use for it, doesn’t know how to harness or use it.

    I don’t understand this. Maroon had career years in Edmonton under Todd and Kassian arguably had his best year under Todd. Their on ice performance seems to contradict this statement of yours.

  125. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Yes, given his skill-set and the PP’s lack of success, Auvitu’s lack of usage on the PP was tough to understand.My guess for the coach’s thought-process is that he didn’t trust him as the “1” in a 1-4 PP set-up.

    “We’d score 2 more goals per 60 with Auvitu but give up 0.50/60 so I better not play him there” – McLellan probably

  126. Pink Socks says:

    leadfarmer:
    Pink Socks,

    Unfortunately you need money to build the infrastructure to appeal to western tourists so they bring their money to spend.Having your own crazy alphabet does not help any but at least now they have apps so you can at least figure out where to go and how to get there in English.And how to survive a Marshrutka which would probably scare most tourists that haven’t travelled outside of western Europe and North America

    Funny you mention the Marshrutka. I was in an accident in Bishkek Kyrgyzstan in a packed Marshrutka. No injuries luckily, but definitely not for the faint of heart, especially in a country where road rules are virtually non existent.

  127. Pink Socks says:

    Leroy Draisdale:
    Pink Socks,

    I thought about a third of the way into the season that they should have tried Nuge’s unit first. They seemed to be getting the better chances when they were on the ice.

    Agreed. Deployment was a major issue this season.

  128. digger50 says:

    In regards to Jessie;

    What should have been oh so clear to the Oilers, what we could not see as fans, was the maturity level at 18 years old. The kid should have been in Finland. Not 40 games NHL. Not developing in AHL.

    Craig Simpsons words this past season about Jessie needing to bear down were a tell from the organization.

    REminds me of “Uncle Buck” where the principal is upset that the little girl is not applying herself properly in grade one. She is a “sillyheart”. Great scene

    I know the Oil are dying for him to become that difference maker they drafted. But hard for a teenager not to be a teenager. Other teens may have shown the drive, but hey everybody is different.

    There were also comments from Jessie’s camp that he was a little unhappy at the end of the season. Wish we knew more, but that could be mental fatigue as well.

    So perhaps Jessie’s off season should be more about taking a break from the rigours of the NHL rather than “getting serious”. Sometimes you need to step back in order to go forward.

  129. Pink Socks says:

    digger50: Absolutely Tmac had a leash on Milan, Maroon and Kassian. He does not value what they bring. He has no use for it, doesn’t know how to harness or use it.

    There was something wrong with this team last year and I for one am looking at the coach. Yes, Peter didn’t give him enough, but to deliver that season with a roster many felt would compete??

    When Tmac arrived he had the attitude that he would crack the whip on these bunch of losers, they just need to learn about winning. Tmac found out that when you are that deep in the hole its easy to be dragged down rather than drag everybody up. He insinuated that he’d move out everybody in order for the culture to change. ( Remember my Lion story) Now who is left? Nuge and Tmac, and they are still bottom of the league. What lessons is Tmac pondering this off season?

    I ramble because I believe his unwillingness to adapt his belief system, his thoughts, his preconceived notions on players, had a negative impact on performance.

    Back to Lucic, Maroon, Kassian. Regardless of the new NHL, these player types have been important for Edmonton. There is no way to get out from under the Rodney Dangerfield reputation without this player type, that’s a fact. I do believe Tmac view of their game and their personal strengths affected their performance. I seen few players comfortable in their role all season. I seen many players uncomfortable, playing not to fuck up was their only goal.

    With few roster changes likely this off season our biggest chance for improvement is going to come back to coaching. I didn’t like keeping Tmac but hopefully the belief in him is founded. I do like the other coaches brought in. Biggest move this off season, huge change is needed.

    Excellent post, and I agree on all points.

  130. Pink Socks says:

    Side: I don’t understand this. Maroon had career years in Edmonton under Todd and Kassian arguably had his best year under Todd. Their on ice performance seems to contradict this statement of yours.

    While true that Maroon had career years, I think it’s pretty easy to attribute playing time with 97 to that even though he more than held his own without McDavid. Kassian maybe you can attribute his best year to a new lease on life, but there were also many games last season where he would disappear. I have long advocated for Kassian to play alongside 97. Yet he has not been given the opportunity. A guy who played well with the Sedins and following the Wilson example is Washington, Kassian could have the potential of being a 1RW value contract rather than a 4RW drag on the cap.

    Then Lucic. He has been a tire fire, but for a guy who has been healthy for a vast majority of his career, he shouldn’t just fall off a cliff like he has. Certainly it’s possible, maybe there are other variables to consider, but Edmonton Lucic is not Boston or even LA Lucic. He doesn’t seem to have any ability to control a game anymore. I only remember one game last year against Nashville where he clearly got 2 points for the Oil. I want that Lucic back. The one that puts the fear in the opponent and if he isn’t scoring he is creating havoc. Instead, he is gripping the stick too tight, afraid to screw up, and making idiotic decisions. It’s on TMac as much as it is on Milan. I hope he has free reign to terrorize the ice again next season.

  131. Pink Socks says:

    digger50:

    Craig Simpson

    Seriously, fuck that guy.

  132. pts2pndr says:

    Stud Muffin: I’m not a fan Mascherin he’s small and isn’t a plus skater, that’s a bad combination.

    You must realy be a fan of Yamamoto if that is how you feel!

  133. Side says:

    Pink Socks: While true that Maroon had career years, I think it’s pretty easy to attribute playing time with 97 to that even though he more than held his own without McDavid.Kassian maybe you can attribute his best year to a new lease on life, but there were also many games last season where he would disappear.I have long advocated for Kassian to play alongside 97.Yet he has not been given the opportunity.A guy who played well with the Sedins and following the Wilson example is Washington, Kassian could have the potential of being a 1RW value contract rather than a 4RW drag on the cap.

    Then Lucic.He has been a tire fire, but for a guy who has been healthy for a vast majority of his career, he shouldn’t just fall off a cliff like he has.Certainly it’s possible, maybe there are other variables to consider, but Edmonton Lucic is not Boston or even LA Lucic.He doesn’t seem to have any ability to control a game anymore.I only remember one game last year against Nashville where he clearly got 2 points for the Oil.I want that Lucic back.The one that puts the fear in the opponent and if he isn’t scoring he is creating havoc. Instead, he is gripping the stick too tight, afraid to screw up, and making idiotic decisions.It’s on TMac as much as it is on Milan.I hope he has free reign to terrorize the ice again next season.

    Since Maroon was traded to NJD, he was 17gp and 13 points without McDavid. Small sample size but he seems to have picked up where he left off without playing with McDavid. Todd was also the one who put Maroon on McDavid’s line where they were pretty successful together. It’s odd to say that Todd didn’t “harness Maroon” properly when Maroon had career years with a player that Todd paired him up with. Saying Todd doesn’t “harness Maroon” right seems to suggest that Maroon could perform even better than he can, but how could one make that statement if Maroon is already putting up career numbers?

    Also, a little personal gripe of mine, I feel like Todd gets blamed for a lot of things he shouldn’t be and when there are successes underneath him it’s usually attributed to something else. Todd got the most out of Maroon, imo, so why doesn’t he get credit for that at all?

    Kassian was given shots on McDavid’s line but I don’t recall any remarkable production. I think Kassian played great with Khaira though, and would like to see more of that. He looked a lot better then when he was with Letestu. I think Kassian’s problem was the same problem that most of the team had last year. You could argue that’s Todd’s fault as well but Kassian still held his own and I don’t see him getting worse next year.

  134. digger50 says:

    Side: I don’t understand this. Maroon had career years in Edmonton under Todd and Kassian arguably had his best year under Todd. Their on ice performance seems to contradict this statement of yours.

    Thanks SIDE. I can only share my thoughts,

    In year one both had good years. In year two both had much poorer years. Why?

    Both Maroon and Kassian are emotional players. They are vocal, popular, motivation guys. They both can bring skill and ruggedness to the game, and they play on emotion.

    Stifle this type of player, take away their game, take away their confidence and they crash.

    Harness this type of player and you’ve got lightning in a bottle. There are several of these players in the playoffs right now.

    Specifically though, we were talking about being leashed.

    Its still hockey. Oilers were bottom of the heap. Respect plays a huge part in the mental aspects of the game. Drai made several public comments on how he liked “having Lucic around” More time and space. Drive a little harder knowing your team has your back. That attitude seemed to die on the vine this year.

    Leading to a game where both Connor and Nuge were taken into the boards after the whistle – and Zack just skating on by. After the game, when asked, Tmac stated “that’s exactly the response I wanted” (this is where the leash reference comes from) Everybody became tame – see Nurse. I get it, penalty kill sucked. But so does losing your swagger.

    So I guess it comes down to your beliefs. Taking a 2 minute penalty is bad for your team. OR taking a two minute penalty is good for the mental health of your team.

    If you are coaching a veteran team you generally don’t have to worry (as much) about ego, confidence, adjusting to roles………and the list goes on. Coaching a young team and its a handful. Some coaches are better suited to one than the other.

    as an aside, but you already know this – Maroons points came from playing with 97 and 29, not from playing under Todd. Kassian stapled to fourth line as he watched Rattie and Pontus try out on the top line affected his point total in a negative way.

  135. pts2pndr says:

    Pink Socks:
    The only reason JP is being compared to Yak is because they are not North American and both from “Europe”.And even then is not accurate.Yak is from Tatarstan (Asia), which for those familiar with the area, while it may be in Russian land and a majority speak the Russian language, is not Russian at all.Demographically and culturally it is much more similar to the old Soviet republics Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.So to call them comparable is just stupid.Just like #1 pick Dahlin is only compared to Lidstrom.I wonder why.Funny I haven’t seen him compared to Larry Murphy yet.

    Anyways, the only way Yak was mishandled in Edmonton was the coaching genius of Dallas Eakins, followed by zero effort given by the new coaching regime to “fix” him. Nelson of course had him on the right path but we all know how that turned out.

    So then the question leads into, if Yakplays under a Kreuger or a Nelson, how does his career look today.Vegas should sign him in the offseason.Seriously.Gallant is of the same ilk as Kreuger and Nelson.

    Milan Lucic has been rightfully ripped for his 2 year performance here.He has played for 3 coaches now in his career, Claude Julien, Daryl Sutter, and TMac. Did he suddenly begin shitting all over the ice when he came to Edmonton or could it have something to do with the coaching staff?

    Finally JP.How does JP’s career start if it is under Kreuger, Nelson, Julien, Sutter, or Gallant. It would be interesting to run some sort of matrix to see the average numbers of an individual player under a specific coach, and compare them to others.Of course there are many variables, but it could be a tool to identify, measurably, which coaches actually do get the most out of their players from a statistical standpoint.

    McDavid is going to put up 100 points under Dallas Eakins or Gerard Gallant.So he technically doesn’t matter.Leon the same, he likely does not vary much between coaches because of an elite skill level.But more focusing on the bottom 9 forwards, and when a player falls off a cliff (looking at Looch), is there something else that could be considered a cause.

    Secretly I’m hoping for some early season struggles, TMac’s firing, Nelson leaves Grand Rapids and is back where he should have been in October 2015.He fixes JP and Lucic and takes the team into the playoffs.

    *edit, sorry for the wall of text

    The major difference is called leadership! The people who you mentioned that failed use basic management techniques. Leadership does not rely on you will do as I say because I am the boss. There are but a few things that I would consider myself qualified to speak on but Dallas Eakins and Todd McLellan both broke very basic leadership tenants! When you do so your team will not achieve to an acceptable degree in that the buy in everyone talks about is not there as a group.

  136. commonfan29 says:

    digger50: Craig Simpsons words this past season about Jessie needing to bear down were a tell from the organization.

    REminds me of “Uncle Buck” where the principal is upset that the little girl is not applying herself properly in grade one. She is a “sillyheart”. Great scene

    I’ve got to think this is the first time Craig Simpson has ever reminded anyone of an older woman with a giant mole on her face.

  137. digger50 says:

    Side: Since Maroon was traded to NJD, he was 17gp and 13 points without McDavid. Small sample size but he seems to have picked up where he left off without playing with McDavid. Todd was also the one who put Maroon on McDavid’s line where they were pretty successful together. It’s odd to say that Todd didn’t “harness Maroon” properly when Maroon had career years with a player that Todd paired him up with. Saying Todd doesn’t “harness Maroon” right seems to suggest that Maroon could perform even better than he can, but how could one make that statement if Maroon is already putting up career numbers?

    Also, a little personal gripe of mine, I feel like Todd gets blamed for a lot of things he shouldn’t be and when there are successes underneath him it’s usually attributed to something else.Todd got the most out of Maroon, imo, so why doesn’t he get credit for that at all?

    Kassian was given shots on McDavid’s line but I don’t recall any remarkable production. I think Kassian played great with Khaira though, and would like to see more of that. He looked a lot better then when he was with Letestu.I think Kassian’s problem was the same problem that most of the team had last year. You could argue that’s Todd’s fault as well but Kassian still held his own and I don’t see him getting worse next year.

    I understand your gripe. Yes Todd gets too much blame sometimes, its true.

    To move forward:

    Kassian again right out of camp is doing interviews “my line is this…” “my line is that…” That is a guy who is confident in his line, clear on their role, knows what to expect.

    Next game and for 82 thereafter he becomes unclear and you never hear those type of ownership words from him again.

    That’s Tmac. His line blender is absolutely detrimental to the mental health of his team

  138. littleenglish says:

    VOR,

    I don’t understand your point about telegraphing a slapshot since the slap shot by nature is telegraphed no matter how fast or deceptive the swing looks – Also Shea weber scored over 20 goals twice in his career so to me that makes him pretty damn lethal. So I would think the sheer velocity of the shot would cause goalies to miss or shit their pants.

    If you want to talk about telegraphing a shot then might I suggest we look at the snapshot – guys like Ovy and Laine shoot similarly and don’t have to load up as they let the stick do the work for them.

    What do the shoulders do?

    I’m a caveman in biomechanics, but the shoulders open towards the target to create rotational torsion(?) Shoulders drop or what you say abduct towards the stick to facilitate flexing of stick.

    Look ma, I participated!

  139. VOR says:

    Biggus Dickus:
    I know there has bee a push back in the NFL about forcing perfect form on quarterbacks, as some guys can huck it better with what is historically considered good form. Some elite golf coaches are also becoming less sticklery about things that don’t really matter. And who can forget Chad Bradford? Point is I think analyzing biomechanics so intensely is putting the cart before the horse. Especially in a scouting context.

    I am of the position that biomechanics is one leg of the performance table. Even in highly technical sports perfect biomechanics is no guarantee of success. Lousy biomechanics on the other hand makes performance excellence an uphill struggle.

    This great article about Tom House another of the pioneers of biomechanics in professional sport explains my position beautifully.

    House for those of you who don’t know is probably the top teacher of pitching biomechanics in all of baseball, or was, then one day he realized…well better to read it for yourself.

    https://www.wired.com/2015/10/baseball-building-better-nfl-quarterbacks/

    I think biomechanical analysis should be part of the analysis scouts perform. Particularly in terms of the fit of the player to the system. But it should always be part of a broader analysis. I have never recommend narrow focus approaches to drafting – I belong to the more we know the better school – biomechanical strengths and weaknesses are something we can analyze and know.

    That said, some teams can find value drafting kids who perform great while having weaknesses in the biomechanical leg of their performance table. Those would be the teams that have coaches who are great at teaching biomechanics. You use whatever competitive advantage you can.

    On the other hand some teams need to draft kids with close to flawless biomechanics because while maybe they are great at developing say their players psychological and physical fitness they are terrible at teaching basic skills. Teams need to know what aspects of performance they are great at nurturing and what aspects they don’t do well. While they should be constantly trying to improve their skills at coaching all aspects of performance in the short term they need to be picking players that can benefit from their current coaching/development programs.

  140. digger50 says:

    littleenglish:
    VOR,

    I don’t understand your point about telegraphing a slapshot since the slap shot by nature is telegraphed no matter how fast or deceptive the swing looks – Also Shea weber scored over 20 goals in his career so to me that makes him pretty damn lethal.So I would think the sheer velocity of the shot would cause goalies to miss and shit their pants.

    If you want to talk about telegraphing a shot then we can look at the snapshot – guys like Ovy and Laine shoot similarly and don’t have to load up as they let the stick do the work for them.

    What do the shoulders do?

    I’m a caveman in biomechanics, but the shoulders open towards the target to create rotational torsion(?)Shoulders drop or what you say abduct towards the stick to facilitate flexing of stick.

    Look ma, I participated!

    participating is good

    and if it goes bad, just blame your phone. Or Tmac

  141. Pink Socks says:

    pts2pndr: The major difference is called leadership! The people who you mentioned that failed use basic management techniques. Leadership does not rely on you will do as I say because I am the boss. There are but a few things that I would consider myself qualified to speak on but Dallas Eakins and Todd McLellan both broke very basic leadership tenants! When you do so your team will not achieve to an acceptable degree in that the buy in everyone talks about is not there as a group.

    I agree. The type of HC leadership qualities seems to have a large affect on player performance. The league as a whole is showing this, case in point Gallant in Vegas.

  142. littleenglish says:

    digger50: participating is good

    and if it goes bad, just blame your phone.Or Tmac

    Thanks I’ll keep that in mind next time I say something really stupid!

  143. Pink Socks says:

    Side: Since Maroon was traded to NJD, he was 17gp and 13 points without McDavid. Small sample size but he seems to have picked up where he left off without playing with McDavid. Todd was also the one who put Maroon on McDavid’s line where they were pretty successful together. It’s odd to say that Todd didn’t “harness Maroon” properly when Maroon had career years with a player that Todd paired him up with. Saying Todd doesn’t “harness Maroon” right seems to suggest that Maroon could perform even better than he can, but how could one make that statement if Maroon is already putting up career numbers?

    Also, a little personal gripe of mine, I feel like Todd gets blamed for a lot of things he shouldn’t be and when there are successes underneath him it’s usually attributed to something else.Todd got the most out of Maroon, imo, so why doesn’t he get credit for that at all?

    Kassian was given shots on McDavid’s line but I don’t recall any remarkable production. I think Kassian played great with Khaira though, and would like to see more of that. He looked a lot better then when he was with Letestu.I think Kassian’s problem was the same problem that most of the team had last year. You could argue that’s Todd’s fault as well but Kassian still held his own and I don’t see him getting worse next year.

    I agree on Maroon, TMac deserves credit where it is due by putting him on that line. He takes quite a bit of blame, most deserved, some I perhaps is not fair, but I think that comes with the territory on having a team not perform up to its potential.

    Kassian I really like as a player, and even more as a human for overcoming negatives in his life and refocusing on more appropriate things. Your point on him I disagree with though. He was not given an opportunity with 97.

    Kassian with Khaira I thought by eye were okay but it isn’t reflected in numbers. I checked to see if Letestu was a drag on that pair but he wasnt. Kassian w/ Khaira w/o Letestu – CF% 43.84, GF% 33.3. Ouch. Letestu had a positive effect on them, however it was only ~60 minutes all season. Kassian w/ Letestu and w/o Khaira held it’s own in CF%, but the goal share was atrocious.

    As for Kassian with McDavid 16/17, only 38 minutes. Numbers are fine but too small of a sample size. Kassian with McDavid in 17/18, only 46 minutes. Again good numbers and great goal share, but too small a sample.

    Next year for the record I want:

    93-97-44
    Anyone but 27-29-98

    I’m good with 29-18-98 as well as Strome and Leon had some nice numbers together, but then we’re hooped with the 3C.

  144. VOR says:

    littleenglish:
    VOR,

    I don’t understand your point about telegraphing a slapshot since the slap shot by nature is telegraphed no matter how fast or deceptive the swing looks – Also Shea weber scored over 20 goals in his career so to me that makes him pretty damn lethal.So I would think the sheer velocity of the shot would cause goalies to miss and shit their pants.

    If you want to talk about telegraphing a shot then I suggest welook at the snapshot – guys like Ovy and Laine shoot similarly and don’t have to load up as they let the stick do the work for them.

    What do the shoulders do?

    I’m a caveman in biomechanics, but the shoulders open towards the target to create rotational torsion(?)Shoulders drop or what you say abduct towards the stick to facilitate flexing of stick.

    Look ma, I participated!

    Montreal’s power play, as Woodguy has shown, isn’t as good at generating points per 60 with Shea Weber on the point as it is with Jeff Petry. The question I was answering is why that is true. Yes, occasionally one of those bombs goes in but mostly it is a waste of power play time despite Weber arguably having the hardest/fastest slap shot in the NHL and has broken players legs, the plexiglass and if I recall rightly once put the puck through the boards.

    That shot is terrifying but it loses some of its terror because the time it takes to windup gives defencemen time to not only get out of the way but to move traffic from in front of the goaltender so the tender gets a good look. Also, the set up of a slap shot like Weber’s best often takes more than one pass to the point to get him in position and with time to launch. If you think about it this is wasting power play time. Now if Weber can slide in to the HD box and unleash – yikes.

    As for the snap shot. I think you probably need to square your shoulders but actually if you try actually taking the shot (air guitar it if you don’t have a stick) I’d say it combines aspects of the slap shot and the wrist shot. One shoulder abducts, the other adducts, weight shifts from back to front leg. However, a lot of it is forearm and wrist strength and power. I will try to find some pictures with angles at different points in the shot mechanics.

  145. VOR says:

    VOR: Montreal’s power play, as Woodguy has shown, isn’t as good at generating points per 60 with Shea Weber on the point as it is with Jeff Petry. The question I was answering is why that is true. Yes, occasionally one of those bombs goes in but mostly it is a waste of power play timedespite Weber arguably having the hardest/fastest slap shot in the NHL and has broken players legs, the plexiglass and if I recall rightly once put the puck through the boards.

    That shot is terrifying but it loses some of its terror because the time it takes to windup gives defencemen time to not only get out of the way but to move traffic from in front of the goaltender so the tender gets a good look. Also, the set up of a slap shot like Weber’s best often takes more than one pass to the point to get him in position and with time to launch. If you think about it this is wasting power play time. Now if Weber can slide in to the HD box and unleash – yikes.

    As for the snap shot. I think you probably need to square your shoulders but actually if you try actually taking the shot (air guitar it if you don’t have a stick) I’d say it combines aspects of the slap shot and the wrist shot. One shoulder abducts, the other adducts, weight shifts from back to front leg. However, a lot of it is forearm and wrist strength and power. I will try to find some pictures with angles at different points in the shot mechanics.

    Here is a similar University of Manitoba analysis of what happens in a snap shot

    https://umanitoba.ca/faculties/kinrec/hlhpri/media/HockeySnapShot.pdf

    Though less study has gone into exactly what muscle is doing what and how you could train them versus the slap shot, you still get the idea.

  146. littleenglish says:

    VOR: Montreal’s power play, as Woodguy has shown, isn’t as good at generating points per 60 with Shea Weber on the point as it is with Jeff Petry. The question I was answering is why that is true. Yes, occasionally one of those bombs goes in but mostly it is a waste of power play timedespite Weber arguably having the hardest/fastest slap shot in the NHL and has broken players legs, the plexiglass and if I recall rightly once put the puck through the boards.

    That shot is terrifying but it loses some of its terror because the time it takes to windup gives defencemen time to not only get out of the way but to move traffic from in front of the goaltender so the tender gets a good look. Also, the set up of a slap shot like Weber’s best often takes more than one pass to the point to get him in position and with time to launch. If you think about it this is wasting power play time. Now if Weber can slide in to the HD box and unleash – yikes.

    As for the snap shot. I think you probably need to square your shoulders but actually if you try actually taking the shot (air guitar it if you don’t have a stick) I’d say it combines aspects of the slap shot and the wrist shot. One shoulder abducts, the other adducts, weight shifts from back to front leg. However, a lot of it is forearm and wrist strength and power. I will try to find some pictures with angles at different points in the shot mechanics.

    Ah I see, I wonder if it’s also because Weber is not that great of a passer. If I watched him more I suppose I’d see what you see – that his slap shots are wasted opportunities. I think a lot of his goals scored are off one timers.

    On snapshots, I mostly agree but I would think that forearm and wrist strength would be the finishing touch to a great snapshot. Which is why the stick flex depends so much on the weight on of the shooter.

    Pictures of the mechanics would be neat!

    Edit- thx for the link will take a look

  147. leadfarmer says:

    The game 2 of Stanley Cup Finals is on NBCSN so that NBC can show American Ninja Warrior

    Also Vegas has way more personality than the NHL I’m used to. Sure it’s cheezy. But so is Vegas

  148. Side says:

    digger50,

    I feel like your comment can be directed towards the team as a whole and not just Kassian and Maroon. They all played.. off this year with the exception of a few players who took steps forward. I personally think this year was an outlier just like last year, and that the “normal” is somewhere inbetween. I see what you mean about putting Kassian and Maroon on a leash, but at the same time, when you’re a team with a historically bad penalty kill at one point in the season, I think the last thing you want to do is encourage behaviors that create power plays for the other team. What’s going to demoralize the team more? Kassian not “sticking up” for McDavid or Nuge and giving a late hit, creating a penalty? Or Kassian taking a penalty for sticking up for them, and the other team scoring?

    I very much doubt Todd was putting the leash on as tight as you think. For example, when Kassian just demolished the Sharks in their playoff series, I don’t imagine Todd went to Kassian and said “hey you need to reel it back, here. You better not pull this shit next year”. I think Todd was trying to reel in any behaviors that would lead to penalties for the other team just to stop the bleeding of his PK this year.

    “Maroons points came from playing with 97 and 29, not from playing under Todd.”

    This is true. But then you look at the Golden Knights and you hear how Gallant is an amazing coach who gets credited for the career years a lot of his players are putting up.

    Compare that to how Todd gets treated in Edmonton. You have posters on this board who go out of their way to suggest any players taking steps forward under him are basically doing so in spite of Todd, or they knock Todd saying he could “get them to do more”. And I don’t buy the “Maroon got his points because he was with McDavid” as a way to knock Maroon’s ability. McDavid was paired up with Taylor Hall and they weren’t a point factory. McDavid was paired up with how many wingers these last couple of seasons? Not all of them were successes. If anyone could play with McDavid and put up a lot of points, then he wouldn’t have so many wingers he was test driving. Maroon got points because Todd saw how well Maroon complimented McDavid and he was the one who decided to stick with it. Maroon has also said in interviews how much confidence he has gotten by playing with McDavid and I think we are seeing that carry over to the NJD. Again, who made that pairing happen and stuck with it? Todd.

    Pink Socks,

    I remember seeing some numbers Woodguy posted for Kassian a while ago that suggested Letestu was a drag on Kassian and without Letestu, Kassian was producing well for a 4th liner and could even put up 3rd line production with a better center.

    I am going off of memory, though.

  149. Nailer Yakumoto says:

    Holy crap Vegas is going to win the Cup.

  150. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Neal scores – VGK crazy sticks. And tempo.

    Holtby is fighting the puck IMO. He’ll have to get it together quick.

  151. OriginalPouzar says:

    Side: Since Maroon was traded to NJD, he was 17gp and 13 points without McDavid. Small sample size but he seems to have picked up where he left off without playing with McDavid. Todd was also the one who put Maroon on McDavid’s line where they were pretty successful together. It’s odd to say that Todd didn’t “harness Maroon” properly when Maroon had career years with a player that Todd paired him up with. Saying Todd doesn’t “harness Maroon” right seems to suggest that Maroon could perform even better than he can, but how could one make that statement if Maroon is already putting up career numbers?

    Also, a little personal gripe of mine, I feel like Todd gets blamed for a lot of things he shouldn’t be and when there are successes underneath him it’s usually attributed to something else.Todd got the most out of Maroon, imo, so why doesn’t he get credit for that at all?

    Kassian was given shots on McDavid’s line but I don’t recall any remarkable production. I think Kassian played great with Khaira though, and would like to see more of that. He looked a lot better then when he was with Letestu.I think Kassian’s problem was the same problem that most of the team had last year. You could argue that’s Todd’s fault as well but Kassian still held his own and I don’t see him getting worse next year.

    The numbers on Kassian and Khaira suggest otherwise and it wasn’t because of Letestu as the third line-mate. In fact, with Letestu the numbers improved to just below 50% corsi and 50% goal differential. Without Letestu JJ and Kassian were at 43% corsi and 33% goal differential.

  152. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Fleury took a flop if the Caps get him doing that with pressure their world will be a different oyster

  153. rickithebear says:

    VOR
    Wow!

    When rugby changed there throw in rules 30+ years ago
    I went into the gym, marked different elevations and distance from wall.
    Looked at historic videos to determine the variance in throwing motion.
    Video taped me throwing 10 rugby balls at different distances and elevations
    Until I had changed the muscle memory to throw in at an elite accuracy under the new rules.

    When I identify systems, Video shows me repeated mechanics that are successful for different size and shaped players.

    Ference was a top HD dman in Boston, with great stick leverage arm pit level at chest and shoulder like a guard 2nd level on LB.
    He was a top HD dmam at start of Oiler career, did not leverage in new year. Shoulder wrecked HD career gone.

    For me player mechanics, has to fit my theories.
    What teams (coach personnel) generate players of those mechanics.
    Foot turns for d…….
    Were does crosscheck best leverage a player……

    The Soviet Sports Review had such mechanics based articles.
    The article on breathing patterns increased sprint speed by 13% and breathing patterns for controlled runs. I used both based on need.

    This was 30 years ago!

    Binary mechanics is techniques of biomechanical movement.
    I have pages of observed biomechanics positive and negative.

    Have practised this 30 years ago.
    This is how I taught my young athletes
    With great Rep Side results
    Russians were years ahead of us.

    Now that I know you are a goalie.
    Versed in identifying reward mechanics.
    With a shot targeted below the arms yielding Sh% in the 30% range.
    Those being the most effective reward vs counter attack potential.
    Their are 2 glove positions played in last 10 years.
    Which is most efficient for shots above pad and tight to body.
    As well as movement to upper corner of the Net.

    I would love your opinion.

    I have 3 levels of analysis.
    1. Base theory with stated Goal dif affect.
    2. Base theory with graphic data display and support.
    3. Binary mechanic analysis of movement married with given portions of theory identifying +ve and -ve.

    You have only ever received #1 from me.

  154. JimmyV1965 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: Pitlick played on the best checking line in hockey with Radek Faska.

    They posted 50% CF and 65%GF playing the toughest comp.

    Caggiula dragged the best player on earth to 45%CF and 39%GF (!!)

    Other than scoring close to the same amount of goals and both paying forward in the NHL I don’t think they have much else in common.

    At the age Drake Caggiula is right now, Pitlick had played a grand total of 27 games and had 6 pts. That should give us all hope that the Drake can one day be a productive player. I think he still has good upside. Someone just has to teach him how to play defence.

  155. rickithebear says:

    JimmyV1965: At the age Drake Caggiula is right now, Pitlick had played a grand total of 27 games and had 6 pts. That should give us all hope that the Drake can one day be a productive player.I think he still has good upside. Someone just has to teach him how to play defence.

    Every line needs speed and Pitlick hade game change exceleration.
    Caggiula does not.
    We needed his speed. Badly!

    Sigh!

  156. rickithebear says:

    VOR: Montreal’s power play, as Woodguy has shown, isn’t as good at generating points per 60 with Shea Weber on the point as it is with Jeff Petry. The question I was answering is why that is true. Yes, occasionally one of those bombs goes in but mostly it is a waste of power play timedespite Weber arguably having the hardest/fastest slap shot in the NHL and has broken players legs, the plexiglass and if I recall rightly once put the puck through the boards.

    That shot is terrifying but it loses some of its terror because the time it takes to windup gives defencemen time to not only get out of the way but to move traffic from in front of the goaltender so the tender gets a good look. Also, the set up of a slap shot like Weber’s best often takes more than one pass to the point to get him in position and with time to launch. If you think about it this is wasting power play time. Now if Weber can slide in to the HD box and unleash – yikes.

    As for the snap shot. I think you probably need to square your shoulders but actually if you try actually taking the shot (air guitar it if you don’t have a stick) I’d say it combines aspects of the slap shot and the wrist shot. One shoulder abducts, the other adducts, weight shifts from back to front leg. However, a lot of it is forearm and wrist strength and power. I will try to find some pictures with angles at different points in the shot mechanics.

    2-3 years ago I said take the avg of the 15 best dman pp sh%
    And look at what # of PP fwd that stoops at.

    Many years ago HD and open/closed theory was the marriage of shooting a rifle with hockey shooting.

    1. Closer you are the more accurately you target open spaces in net elevation
    2. You must understand what distance is ethical for you to shoot a moving target.
    Adjusted path accuracy.
    3. Closer and quicker the trigger pull is the less time for drop of bullet to exit kill zone. A value of reaction time.
    I like to use fastball to plate time versus baseball to plate reaction time. The batter (goalie has more time) with the baseball. The bat load mechanics intervals are different. One provides more time to see and load. Like a goalie reacting to path of shot. Targeting phase 3.

  157. rickithebear says:

    Nailer Yakumoto:
    Holy crap Vegas is going to win the Cup.

    I said that in July at work? 😎

    We shall see?

  158. Munny says:

    Just say OV for a great-tasting cheer.

  159. Jaxon says:

    Paajarvi signed an extension with Ottawa. 1 year at $900k.

  160. Professor Q says:

    Wasn’t there a documentary/shooting tutorial video by Brett Hull called Snap Shot Hockey or Slap Shot Hockey? I had it as a wee ’90s babe and held him to quite the acclaim, even though I could really only wrist shot (and backhand) effectively.

    It had Brett on the front. What a player he was.

  161. deardylan says:

    Lois Lowe:
    I apparently stopped in on a day where Yak, Nelson, and Eakins are still topics of discussion. I am heartened that some things never change.

    Well I hope biomechanics and Tatarstan topics of discussion are a wee bit different than last time you visited.

    PS. Enjoyed reading those posts!

  162. deardylan says:

    Overheard from Enzo Ferrari and Don Raspberry in an alternative universe,

    Jeep is Americas only real car.
    Las Vegas is Americas only real city.
    Happy Meal is Americas only real meal.
    Melting ice in June is Americas only real rink.

    All I know is that America makes life more SUR-REAL!

    #LasVegasAlltheWay

  163. Professor Q says:

    It’s going to be a very rough series.

  164. leadfarmer says:

    The guy no one here would take for free two months ago!!

  165. godot10 says:

    JimmyV1965: At the age Drake Caggiula is right now, Pitlick had played a grand total of 27 games and had 6 pts. That should give us all hope that the Drake can one day be a productive player.I think he still has good upside. Someone just has to teach him how to play defence.

    #ThoroughlyMediocreCoach has had two years to teach him, which suggests he ain’t much of a teaching coach.

  166. VOR says:

    rickithebear:
    VOR
    Wow!

    When rugby changed there throw in rules 30+ years ago
    I went into the gym, marked different elevations and distance from wall.
    Looked at historic videos to determine the variance in throwing motion.
    Video taped me throwing 10 rugby balls at different distances and elevations
    Until I had changed the muscle memory to throw in at an elite accuracy under the new rules.

    When I identify systems, Video shows me repeated mechanics that are successful for different size and shaped players.

    Ference was a top HD dman in Boston, with great stick leverage arm pit level at chest and shoulder like a guard 2nd level on LB.
    He was a top HD dmam at start of Oiler career, did not leverage in new year. Shoulder wrecked HD career gone.

    For me player mechanics, has to fit my theories.
    What teams (coach personnel) generate players of those mechanics.
    Foot turns for d…….
    Were does crosscheck best leverage a player……

    The Soviet Sports Review had such mechanics based articles.
    The article on breathing patterns increased sprint speed by 13% and breathing patterns for controlled runs. I used both based on need.

    This was 30 years ago!

    Binary mechanics is techniques of biomechanical movement.
    I have pages of observed biomechanics positive and negative.

    Have practised this 30 years ago.
    This is how I taught my young athletes
    With great Rep Side results
    Russianswere years ahead of us.

    Now that I know you are a goalie.
    Versed in identifying reward mechanics.
    With a shot targeted below the arms yielding Sh% in the 30% range.
    Those being the most effective reward vs counter attack potential.
    Their are 2 glove positions played in last 10 years.
    Which is most efficient for shots above pad and tight to body.
    As well as movement to upper corner of the Net.

    I would love your opinion.

    I have 3 levels of analysis.
    1. Base theory with stated Goal dif affect.
    2. Base theory with graphic data display and support.
    3. Binary mechanic analysis of movement married with given portions of theory identifying +ve and -ve.

    You have only ever received #1 from me.

    In order to understand the response I am about to give it would be helpful for readers to understand the glove debate.

    When I was a kid growing up playing goal the approved position for a goalies glove in the ready position was just off the leg pad and at 3 o’clock. It was supposed to be pretty much on a level with your blocker. Then about 15 years ago the orthodoxy changed. Now most goalies at all levels carry their gloves much higher, pretty much level with the butt end of their stick and with the fingers pointing up.

    As it happens Ricki I don’t use either position. I keep my glove near the top of my leg pad pointing down. I have unusually long arms relative to my legs and it changes the mechanics. Not to mention my glove hand is moving constantly.

    I maintain that if you watch goalies gloves in the ready position the glove is moving not stationary. You can’t freeze in the ready position, you have to maintain as much potential kinetic energy as possible (objects at rest remain at rest, objects in motion remain in motion. Similarly your glove hand must be in motion. Thus there is no such thing as a goalie glove position but rather a range of positions.

    I can assure you the range of positions is much larger than most experts believe.

    Returning to the original debate I think the high glove hand position is flawed. I find it far easier and faster to get my glove hand up than down. I get the idea is to take away the top shelf, glove side but I think it exposes the bottom 18 inches of the net.

    Moving on from that rather esoteric discussion I wanted to let people know that the technology I use today to do biomechanical analysis bears little resemblance to what I used 37 years ago when I first did this. There is so much more information in the data stream than when we worked from super 8 or 16mm or worse video. The analytical software is infinitely better. Not to mention now the software is AI assisted. It learns my preferences and what I am looking for and highlights examples.

    What hasn’t changed is how my mind processes that data. I am a child of the analog world. I am not comfortable with trying to reduce the real world to binary models.

    For example I don’t like the idea of drawing an imaginary box on the ice and saying what you do inside that box is more important than what you do outside it. I love creativity and flow far too much to attempt to create arbitrary restrictions. Plus like all goalies I am only too aware that puck movement can make the greatest goalie look like a fool.

  167. VOR says:

    rickithebear: 2-3 years ago I said take the avg of the 15 best dman pp sh%
    And look at what # of PP fwd that stoops at.

    Many years ago HD and open/closed theory was the marriage of shooting a rifle with hockey shooting.

    1. Closer you are the more accurately you target open spaces in net elevation
    2. You must understand what distance is ethical for you to shoot a moving target.
    Adjusted path accuracy.
    3. Closer and quicker the trigger pull is the less time fordrop of bullet to exit kill zone. A value of reaction time.
    I like to use fastball to plate time versus baseball to plate reaction time. The batter (goalie has more time) with the baseball. The bat load mechanics intervals are different. One provides more time to see and load. Like a goalie reacting to path of shot. Targeting phase 3.

    I have to disagree with your whole approach. I still shoot competitively, skeet (English and Olympic) and Biathalon. You have to shoot quickly in both disciplines but you can’t rush. You have to be in flow. The same is true, I believe, in shooting a hockey puck. Great shooting in game states is about being in flow within that game space. Great biomechanics are a combination of intense training and perfect flow.

  168. Russian Rocket says:

    VOR,

    In regards to you question yesterday on optimal abduction and flexion angles, I get where you are coming from. In many non chaotic sports such as throws, sprints and jumps you can keep working to find better launch/attack angles to find that extra inch or tenth of a second, the issue with hockey is its super chaotic and you rarely have the same movement twice where-as in track and field events they are in a very closed environment.

    I think a different way of looking at it may be what is the optimum amount of force required and how much time is needed to produce said force for the task, in this case a slap shot.

  169. GMB3 says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    If JP plays full time on 29’s wing and is on PP2, he’ll score over 50pts next year.

    If he’s on 29’s wing and PP1, I wouldn’t bet against 60.

    If he’s on 97’s wing and PP1 then 70 is possible.

    I sure hope so, but I think JP’s P/60 and G/60 were inflated when he had a run of a high shooting percentage/scored some lucky net front goals.

    I remember thinking JP was producing a lot whilst still not being very noticeable in the offensive zone. I also remember looking at his shooting percentage and thinking it was lower than I imagined, as I felt he hadn’t played much of a role in creating many scoring chances.

    I then went back and watched the extended highlights on youtube and rewatched some games on game centre and noticed he had several 4/5 shot games where 4+ of them were his trademark nom-threatening wristers taken just after entering the zone from the sideboards.

    If JP becomes a consistent goal scorer, I think it will be as a goalmouth net crashing type of player. Outside of a single goal off a one timer I don’t recall being wowed by his shot. I believe even hockeysfuture’s review had a slightly negative opinion about his shooting ability prior to his draft.

    Anton Slepyshev on the other hand, that man had a fantastic release (in 16/17 JP mentioned Slepyshev as having the best release on the team in an interview when prompted about his own shot FWiW)

  170. Munny says:

    VOR,

    It is impossible to react fast from a frozen position, no matter the sport, no matter the duty. You must be moving to act quickly. For “skaters” in most sports, this is not an issue, you’re moving.

    There are other sports that start from a static position, but everyone is starting off with the same handicap.

    Even the old-school “ready position” had your hips moving side-to-side.

    Humans don’t do well at still. Unmoving is hard. Ready means moving.

    I know you know all this. I’m just shocked it wasn’t self-evident back in the day.

  171. OriginalPouzar says:

    GMB3: I sure hope so, but I think JP’s P/60 and G/60 were inflated when he had a run of a high shooting percentage/scored some lucky net front goals.

    I remember thinking JP was producing a lot whilst still not being very noticeable in the offensive zone. I also remember looking at his shooting percentage and thinking it was lower than I imagined, as I felt he hadn’t played much of a role in creating many scoring chances.

    I then went back and watched the extended highlights on youtube and rewatched some games on game centre and noticed he had several 4/5 shot games where 4+ of them were his trademark nom-threatening wristers taken just after entering the zone from the sideboards.

    If JP becomes a consistent goal scorer, I think it will be as a goalmouth net crashing type of player. Outside of a single goal off a one timer I don’t recall being wowed by his shot. I believe even hockeysfuture’s review had a slightly negative opinion about his shooting ability prior to his draft.

    Anton Slepyshev on the other hand, that man had a fantastic release (in 16/17 JP mentioned Slepyshev as having the best release on the team in an interview when prompted about his own shot FWiW)

    Speaking of Slep, if JP wants to trademark that non-dangerous shot from just inside the blueline, he’ll probably be in court with Slepy as Slepy has been doing that for years…….

  172. hunter1909 says:

    Oilers fail-ville – JP busting quickly

  173. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    – Good quote from our GM: “Look at [the] Vegas [Golden Knights]. If you want to go player to player, are they fast? They play fast. Watch their support on the breakout. Watch their support in the neutral zone. Watch them move the puck. They have some fast D that move the puck so there’s an element of that. It’s a mentality that we have to recapture.”

    -Re Vegas roster: If their goalie continues to play like he has the last two games (i.e. normal, sub-Hasek Dominator level), they won’t win Cup. Washington’s talent is much better IMO

    – To the extent one can believe a GM its tweaks to the philosophy: with some new coaching approaches, rather than a reboot of the roster.

    – Most here believe that a desperate Chia will liquidate the roster and depth, bleed value in order to win now, becasue the team last year was brutal and broken as a result of the GM’s work: we’ll see

  174. rickithebear says:

    Vor: the stated higher glove position is an observance. As well.
    I wonder ability natural arm mechanics and arm the goth.
    But the more natural reach movement matches my thought rather than the unnatural pull affect of arm.
    But for me the 2 I talk of is the traditional horizontal glove position tat requires pull down, elbow fulcrum and shoulder to cause up and down, as well as wrist swing with pull tighter to body to get full coverage.
    More natural to goalies, but some counter to natural life movement.
    The 2nd is the vertical glove position from sweden which seems to be more structured for making most of the movement the natural reach and should eliminate most of the wrist twist.
    I look forward to your response.

    Like munny I understand flow.
    In football I played box safety, mlb, 7 technique on 5 man line with option to rush or drop back in coverage.
    In rugby I played hooker, open flank, small sized 8, wing. But with an ability to back of scrum to play half taking the ball and as flank or 8 and pass the ball to 30 yards out accurately picking the back to best pass to. Patterned after Serg Blanco skill, hooker skill came from Mike Luke, Tried to patern my whole game after ZinZan Brooke, Even played barefoot in summer hemisphere like he did.

    Flow to me in sport is movement to the binarmechnic actions related to gaining pocession of the scoring device.
    Skating to get the puck or prevent penetration.
    Flowing to the ball in football

    Played right back in soccer, had sprinter speed, could defend penalty box in, flowed with ops in between net and them. Could take pocession on flank drive ball ball forward, not high dribble skill but lead the ball and accurate crosses. Our coach followed 4-4-2 but it was really the Brazilian 4-2-2-2 and patterned my flow forward and score box player crosses based on the great Brazilian right backs, santos, Alberto Torres, junior. They all had good working transition with the right center back cause the 2-2-2-2 compressed to center and allowed free path on the outside.
    This I observed from video of 60,s teams and 70, teams. 40 years ago.

    Sometimes flow in sport is static cause elite thinkers recognize by position and base style strength of teammates and opposition the play is going to come back to you.

    That is why from day 1 i presented WOWY forward pairs who can play off each other at an elite level.
    Base binary strengths as are critical.
    Flow to is the dynamics
    Puck binary mechanics is static analysis of pass or fail actions.

    When it comes to flow I had identified zone entry as the 3rd most critical ratio affect to goal dif.
    But the flow to NZ of forwards is critical to the whole zone entry success route tree.
    Fwd NZ trap is needed for entry reduction cause it leads to the highest % of zone entry prevention.

    So Took base numbers of location actions identified by many others. Took a % root tree to have defined success and failures of Cummulative affect.
    Was not willing to take it beyond 2 decimal point accuracy with a +/- 5% variance for the range.
    Let others play with this one.

    When I first had kinetics discussion with the ubc prof teaching at the UofSK in early 80,s it was the first
    Studies that paired human mechanics with theory in Canada. Not Russia.

  175. Andy Dufresne says:

    OriginalPouzar: Good info – i may pick your brain at some point as my wife is interested in doing a trip through “the Stans” – Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikstan, etc.

    Its going to be a little while though – we’ve got the southern coast of Sri Lanka this Christmas and Rawanda/Uganda/DRC next spring and need to work an Israel trip in soon (and SE Asia) – sigh, so many places to go….

    There is a 4 part Adventure / Travel series called from Russia to Iran on BBC-E channel 1627 on BELL for anyone interested in Eastern Russia and the Caucuses ….I found it highly entertaining and very much what Pink Socks just described.

  176. Andy Dufresne says:

    Pink Socks: I am over there at least once a year and have spent some time in Kazakhstan, and many trips to Kyrgyzstan to visit family.In Kazan, the largest city in Tatarstan, my wife has an old friend from grade school.When we have some extra time we always travel into Kazan for a few days.There the population is about 50/50 Tatar and Russian and seems to be more “Tatar” each time we travel. The further outside the big cities and into the villages, it is exclusively a Tatar population.Tatarstan and the rest of the “Stan’s” to the southeast are all majority Muslim populations, but regardless of the practiced religions, are all extremely family oriented and very few materialistic attitudes.There are no clashes between Muslims and Orthodox and atheists.It is a very calm and kind way of life, but also very poor in the villages.It seems that virtually every family would have one member that desired something different and a life full of busyness, so they would gather their possessions and move to Moscow.From there they send money back to the family and support them.This is very different from the western portion of Russia, in Moscow especially, but even in the small and forgotten villages.I assume Western Russia is much more similar to Finland, though I’d be willing to wager money that the Finn’s are much, much friendlier than the Russians.

    Excellent description. Thank You.

  177. Andy Dufresne says:

    crabman:
    For me Puljujarvi’s biggest issue earlier in the year was his need to carry the puck and force things offensively even when he was on the ice with better puck carriers like McDavid and Draisaitl. He seemed to be trying to do too much and forced a lot of plays and turned the puck over as a result.
    Once he was paired with Strome at the end of the year he seemed to be much more of a north south player and just getting into a good position to shoot allowing Strome to do the heavy lifting. I know the scoring results weren’t as good as with McDavid and Draisaitl but Strome isn’t on their skill level either. It looked to me like Puljujarvi’s game was maturing and I would like to see him play this style in the top6. McDavid and Draisaitl are both great at carrying the puck into the zone and finding the open man. If Puljujarvi can let them do their job and just work on getting open he could have much more success than his 1st 2 seasons.

    Well said. I think this is exactly what TMac was refering to when he said that he felt that JP was intimidated/uncomfortable playing top six minutes…..and seemed/played more comfortably with the third line…..a more natural fit for him…….in the short term…..

  178. rickithebear says:

    My high function lach is going into a room to talk to people and have conversation. With individuals.
    I truly am interested in learning about people. And letting them speak about what they know that I do not. I would love to have Pilsner shot with Jd and partnered with company specials with you.

    At My friend Eugene,s Farm near west lock. He is the kid I meantioned catching his pitches with at the butter dome. A whole collection of Alberta Baseball people came to ask him if he was back in. He was a left handed that had a fastball that was equal to or better than the only pitcher I caught with 95+ speed. With a change up, slow curve, fast curve, slider. A 25 million arm.

    Crashed at his and close friend Ian’s place cause I was dating Ian’s sister. Got three phone calls that day from Mariners, reds and braves. The first call I thought the mariners rec team in Edmonton. Once I realized after the first call it was not rec teams but MLBteams asking if he was pitching. Got the story that he had full ride to LSU for the 93 season with full 4 year ride. But he wanted highly challenging curriculum. Not the classes for jocks. He was to be the lead pitcher of the LSU team that won 93 , 96, and possibly 5 th year 97 NCAA champs LSU Tigers.

    The guy I partner with the pilot Beer plant in PEI shoots Olympic and skeet.
    But we used to have auto shooters that launch 2 clays coming out of the trees walking a trail.
    He shoots a Blazer F3 and B97.
    What do you shoot!

    I had a real good conversation with a former Biathelete who was working as a Air Canada airplane waitress ( what my 5-7 year old daughter calls them). Have not corrected her cause I love thier Kringle. She was helping paraolympic athletes with training. When not flying. I was going to ask about Biathalon rifles. But she asked me to go to her room at the delta near Sunridge. I informed her I was married and had 3 young children. Just liked talking to people to learn about them.
    The convo ended thier.

    Biathalon rifles?

  179. Andy Dufresne says:

    digger50: Absolutely Tmac had a leash on Milan, Maroon and Kassian. He does not value what they bring. He has no use for it, doesn’t know how to harness or use it.

    There was something wrong with this team last year and I for one am looking at the coach. Yes, Peter didn’t give him enough, but to deliver that season with a roster many felt would compete??

    When Tmac arrived he had the attitude that he would crack the whip on these bunch of losers, they just need to learn about winning. Tmac found out that when you are that deep in the hole its easy to be dragged down rather than drag everybody up. He insinuated that he’d move out everybody in order for the culture to change. ( Remember my Lion story) Now who is left? Nuge and Tmac, and they are still bottom of the league. What lessons is Tmac pondering this off season?

    I ramble because I believe his unwillingness to adapt his belief system, his thoughts, his preconceived notions on players, had a negative impact on performance.

    Back to Lucic, Maroon, Kassian. Regardless of the new NHL, these player types have been important for Edmonton. There is no way to get out from under the Rodney Dangerfield reputation without this player type, that’s a fact. I do believe Tmac view of their game and their personal strengths affected their performance. I seen few players comfortable in their role all season. I seen many players uncomfortable, playing not to fuck up was their only goal.

    With few roster changes likely this off season our biggest chance for improvement is going to come back to coaching. I didn’t like keeping Tmac but hopefully the belief in him is founded. I do like the other coaches brought in. Biggest move this off season, huge change is needed.

    You say you ramble……but (with the exception of the first short paragraph) this is as good a description of this particular dynamic as I have seen/read anywhere. The focus elsewhere is usually his mis-use of the 94’s and the rookies.

    Something(s) have definitley seemed “off” regarding TMacs player usage/style but I couldnt put my finger on it. I think you helped define this for me. Thanks.

  180. Andy Dufresne says:

    OriginalPouzar: The numbers on Kassian and Khaira suggest otherwise and it wasn’t because of Letestu as the third line-mate.In fact, with Letestu the numbers improved to just below 50% corsi and 50% goal differential.Without Letestu JJ and Kassian were at 43% corsi and 33% goal differential.

    On a seperate matter…….is the abscence of Letestu addition by subtraction for the comning year?

    Were we not a better team/ better special teams after the trade deadline?

  181. Andy Dufresne says:

    – Most here believe that a desperate Chia will liquidate the roster and depth, bleed value in order to win now, becasue the team last year was brutal and broken as a result of the GM’s work: we’ll see
    Kinger_Oil.redux,

    This is because most here work from the starting point that Chia is “not a smart guy” ….Rather than Chia “is a smart guy” who made at least a couple of serious mistakes……..we shall see.

  182. Andy Dufresne says:

    OriginalPouzar: Speaking of Slep, if JP wants to trademark that non-dangerous shot from just inside the blueline, he’ll probably be in court with Slepy as Slepy has been doing that for years…….

    The day JP develops an NHL calibre shot and at least “minorly” upgrades his physicality, is the day he becomes a bonafide first line RW.

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