What is Life?

In October of 2016, I spoke to prospect insider Simon Boisvert about young forward Jujhar Khaira. This came at a time when the Oilers were desperate for something coming down the pipeline.

  • Simon Boisvert on Khaira: I do think he is NHL-ready. He is very confident now offensively, he reminds me of the Khaira I remember from the BCJHL. This is the year when prospects who have already spent two years in the AHL should be in the NHL—otherwise they become career AHLers. Or tweeners. He is ready for the show. He is their best forward (in Bakersfield), now the question is when will he be called up? Source

Injuries interfered and it took a year, but Jujhar Khaira emerged as a useful NHL player in 2017-18, passing some fairly famous names in terms of productivity. Edmonton needs more, many more forwards and the club needs them soon. What’s bubbling under in Bakersfield?

THE ATHLETIC!

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AHL FORWARDS, POINTS-PER-GAME BY AGE

  • Khaira at age 20 was in no man’s land, similar production to Travis Ewanyk. That said, we know the Oilers slow-play rookie AHL players, so we can surmise he was getting 10-12 minutes a night.
  • Khaira at age 21 suddenly becomes the most productive player in the Bakersfield group (Rattie was playing in Chicago with the Wolves).
  • Khaira at age 22 is NHL-ready and looking for good health and an opportunity. He scores on par with Rattie in the final year of his entry contract.

The question then becomes, who’s next? Jesse Puljujarvi scored well enough in the AHL as a teenager to project as an NHL player age 20. We can’t project him as a 25-goal man, but I’d be comfortable betting on 15 goals and 30 points for JP next season. I think that’s fair. Anyone else? I think the next Oilers forward who’ll arrive from Bakersfield will come from the new arrivals this fall (Kailer Yamamoto, Tyler Benson, Cooper Marody, possibly Ostap Safin). Maybe Joe Gambardella but that’s a distant bell. This list must be better a year from now.

It’s difficult to make a list of possible signings for Edmonton because the cap room isn’t there. If Peter Chiarelli bridges everyone and risks an overage should Puljujarvi blossom, my estimates have the club’s outer marker for a single free agent at $3.5 million. Here’s a possible list.

  1. R Thomas Vanek. He was available a year ago, not sure if the Oilers went after him at that time. He would be a solid insurance policy against the current right-wing depth chart (Ty Rattie, Kailer Yamamoto, Jesse Puljujarvi, Zack Kassian) and should be a lock for 20 goals on an Edmonton skill line populated with 97 or 29.
  2. L Patrick Maroon. Although he’s unlikely to return, Maroon scored just three goals away from McDavid in the 17 regular season games after being traded to the Devils. Maybe there’s a window of opportunity.
  3. RC Riley Nash. I’ve been looking at his numbers and they’re good. Nash was 1.96 5×5/60 scoring with Danton Heinen and David Backes, and had a good possession number. If you could sign him, trade Strome and save some dollars, is that a useful idea?
  4. RD Chris Wideman. I like him, in a Cody Franson kind of way. I’m not suggesting he would be a suitable second pairing addition, but if the club dealt Matt Benning then Wideman might be able to slide into that role.

CZARNIK

I’ve written on this player before, he’s in that Tyler Pitlick zone now, a Group 6 free agent with a window to unrestricted free agency due to lack of NHL games played. It looks like he’ll use his opportunity to have a look.

  • Bruins general manager Don SweeneyCzarnik is going to be a group six [free agent]. We’ve had discussions with Austin. I think Austin is intrigued by what may exist elsewhere. We certainly haven’t closed the door, I don’t think he has as well, but I would be surprised if he doesn’t get to at least to see what may present itself as options for him.” Source

Czarnik is 25, that’s even older than Ty Rattie when he signed with Edmonton. Why do I like him? He’s free (no asset given) skill, having scored 65gp, 25-44-69 in the AHL this past season. In 59 NHL games, he’s 5-12-17, turned pro in 2015 and averages 80 points per 82 AHL games. I always list him as a right-wing, but he plays center quite a bit (won half of 28 faceoffs in 10 NHL games this past season) and is a righty. Small, skilled, inexpensive. He might deliver excellent value.

Mark will join me at 3:40 today on Saturday Sports Extra to discuss the combine. It’s a very important day for these young prospects, you’ll be surprised at some of the shuffling that occurs after this weekend. Interviews that go sideways, worries over injuries or conditions that could impact careers, language barriers, doing one push up, it’s kind of bizarre how much importance is placed on the weekend. I do agree the medical stuff is important though, not sure there’s a wrong answer for most of these questions (because they’re kids, dammit!).

Now that I’m finished the draft rankings, I get to enjoy the publishing of myriad voices and their interpretation of this year’s group. I always like to give credit where due, and in this case it’s Corey Pronman and Scott Wheeler. Pronman’s final list is here. Scott Wheeler’s here. I will post the other lists I follow as time rolls by in June.

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139 Responses to "What is Life?"

  1. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Live is life.

    Na Naaaa Nanana

  2. dustrock says:

    Let’s see if Dahlin can do a single pull-up!

  3. geowal says:

    Is there any reason to believe Riley Nash holds any ill will to the org from his past e person s with the club? I don’t recal any verbal that says whether or no his previous departure was strictly business or taken as a slight. Or perhaps more likely, the other way around, from the guys above Chia, like KLowe, MacT, Howson? Spite can be a powerful de-motivator.

  4. Westchester Oil says:

    LT – you had me worried for a minute there. Your 8:30 am posts (10:30 am Eastern – for me – and 12 noon for Newfoundlanders) are so reliable, I worry in those rare instances when your posts are a few minutes late. 🙂

    Anyways – what’s your best guess as to what Czarnik would cost? Similar to what Pitlick got from Dallas or less?

  5. Lowetide says:

    Westchester Oil:
    LT – you had me worried for a minute there. Your 8:30 am posts (10:30 am Eastern – for me – and 12 noon for Newfoundlanders) are so reliable, I worry in those rare instances when your posts are a few minutes late.🙂

    Anyways – what’s your best guess as to what Czarnik would cost? Similar to what Pitlick got from Dallas or less?

    Lol. I did a Timmy’s run with Mrs. Lowetide and we took the dog and then the Timmy’s people saw the dog and made a fuss at the drive through. 🙂

    I think Czarnik probably costs less than Pitlick, with shorter term.

  6. 106 and 106 says:

    Baby don’t hurt me.

    Don’t hurt me.

    No more.

  7. Westchester Oil says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    Live is life.

    Na Naaaa Nanana

    I spent the summer of ’85 in Europe and this song was played all the time over there. Thanks for the memory jolt.

  8. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Lowetide,

    George may have asked the question, but Opus answered it.

  9. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Westchester Oil: I spent the summer of ’85 in Europe and this song was played all the time over there. Thanks for the memory jolt.

    My memories of this song is necking with girls in highschool behind the old Woodbend Community Hall while “hall parties” raged on in the hall.

    Good times.

  10. Westchester Oil says:

    The chart of ‘AHL Forwards Points per game by age’ is very insightful – thanks for that LT.

    However, whenever I see Mitch Moroz’s name and think, early 2nd round pick, it brings great pain to me as symbolic of the DoD.

    If in an alternative universe, it was ‘Mitch Moroz, 4th or 5th round pick’, I could live with that.

  11. Westchester Oil says:

    Woodguy v2.0: My memories of this song is necking with girls in highschool behind the old Woodbend Community Hall while “hall parties” raged on in the hall.

    Good times.

    I’m jealous that you were able to neck with more than one girl in high school.

    #TeenageNerd

  12. Munny says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    Live is life.

    Na Naaaa Nanana

    You always struck me as more of a Tarzan boy type.

  13. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Munny: You always struck me as more of a Tarzan boy type.

    Pretty much the same song

  14. flyfish1168 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: My memories of this song is necking with girls in highschool behind the old Woodbend Community Hall while “hall parties” raged on in the hall.

    Good times.

    Something like this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YK-wm68c0Z8

  15. Lowetide says:

    Westchester Oil:
    The chart of ‘AHL Forwards Points per game by age’ is very insightful – thanks for that LT.

    However, whenever I see Mitch Moroz’s name and think, early 2nd round pick, it brings great pain to me as symbolic of the DoD.

    If in an alternative universe, it was ‘Mitch Moroz, 4th or 5th round pick’, I could live with that.

    One of the encouraging recent developments for the Oilers (2016+) is that the points-per-game is “round appropriate” or at least closer to what you’d like to see.

  16. €√¥£€^$ says:

    LT,

    My impressions of Oilers prospects are normally planted by your excellent work. In my cobwebbed memories, the picture you painted of JJ was that of a gritty, but offensively-talented player who was a rolling stone during his formative years, so was unable to reach his potential.

    Because of this narrative existing my head, I have been watching him with interest in anticipation of his emergence as an NHL player. His pre-season success was really exciting to see, but we’ve seen that before with MPS and Lander. What I saw in JJ though was that he really had a nose for the net, his work ethic and he was not afraid to go into the hard areas. I expect he will continue to improve as he gains experience and confidence. If he picks up where he left off last pre-season and stays off of IR, he will be a very important piece in the bottom 6 next year. I can see him being a 20 goal guy, if all breaks in the right direction. I do not like him as a C though, unlike many posters.

    Here’s hoping he has better luck in the health department in 2019-20!

  17. Melman says:

    Looking at some of the past drafts and the 08 & 09 years of similarity popped out.

    Doughty #2 behind Stamkos and Hedman #2 behind JT. If your a gm with your 20/20 glasses on do they go in the same order? Do you take the #1 centre or the stud D? TB got lucky getting both back to back (although they didn’t make it to the Bellagio in June)

  18. €√¥£€^$ says:

    As far as Jesse goes, I have seen flashes of his potential and it is real and spectacular. The one game where he was on another level and collected 3 points, speaks volumes. If he puts it all together and is put in a position to succeed, which would be with Drai, I think he gets to a 20 goal 50 point season next year.

  19. JimmyV1965 says:

    Melman:
    Looking at some of the past drafts and the 08 & 09 years of similarity popped out.

    Doughty #2 behind Stamkos and Hedman #2 behind JT.If your a gm with your 20/20 glasses on do they go in the same order?Do you take the #1 centre or the stud D? TB got lucky getting both back to back (although they didn’t make it to the Bellagio in June)

    Drafting the dman takes a level of patience that is challenging in Edmonton.

  20. digger50 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: My memories of this song is necking with girls in highschool behind the old Woodbend Community Hall while “hall parties” raged on in the hall.

    Good times.

    Ha! Got me this morning

    I haven’t heard “necking” since I was “going around” with my junior high sweetheart.

    Awesome

  21. €√¥£€^$ says:

    I like Riley Nash, he was veey effective for Boston last year, but I’d be worried about his price tag, likely North of $3 million/yr. I would prefer him to Strome as a 3C.

    I would think all of Strome, Kassian and Cagguila would have to be moved, though and I would look for draft picks in return. I would target Nash, Matt Calvert, Grabner, Czarnik and Matt Peca and the roster would look like this at Forward:

    RNH – McD – Rattie
    Calvert – Drai – JP
    Lucic – Nash – Grabner
    JJ/Aberg – Czarnik/Peca – Czarnik/Aberg

    I know that Calvert is more suited as a 3LW, but consider him a placeholder for Lucic, in a sense.

    As far as D goes, I am at a bit of a loss… The pending Nurse contract and the NMC’s for Russell and Sekera are a big issue, IMO. So I am stuck here: either Klefbom or Nurse (I lean towards Klef due to his injury history) + Yamamoto + 2019 1st for Erik Karlsson. Would Ottawa do this deal?

    Nurse – Karlsson
    Sekera – Larsson
    Russell – Benning

  22. Munny says:

    digger50: I haven’t heard “necking” since I was “going around” with my junior high sweetheart.

    Woodguy has a hickie, Woodguy has a hickie….

    lol

  23. digger50 says:

    I posted a question yesterday about Jessie draft ranking and then never got back to the blog until late.

    However VOR I did see your reply and read the attached link. Thanks.

    With all the glowing words written on Jessie it’s no wonder they ran to the podium and neglected to read the fine print. That being he was unlikely ready for North America.

    In hindsight he should have been managed differently, at least that’s my opinion from afar. Perhaps with inside knowledge this would be different.

    Regardless of how we got here, those glowing words about Jessie were not false, he has those abilities still, we just have to find a way that let him excel.

    30 points from Jessie next season? To me that would be disappointing. We don’t have to get more if that’s all he’s got, but I certainly want more. Maybe 30 is okay for guy bouncing around the roster but if they are smart they find him a top six home and he’ll be good for 50.

  24. Munny says:

    digger50,

    I think he’s a good bet for a 20 goal, or a 30 assist, season nest year, depending on the role he finds for himself.

    If he flatlines offensively, I think we will have to re-adjust our expectations. If he is tracking like similar prospects, next season should be a breakout year.

  25. digger50 says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    As far as Jesse goes, I have seen flashes of his potential and it is real and spectacular.The one game where he was on another level and collected 3 points, speaks volumes.If he puts it all together and is put in a position to succeed, which would be with Drai, I think he gets to a 20 goal 50 point season next year.

    I like him with Leon as well.

    Thing about Leon though, is he likes to control the puck and actually slow the game down. He’s quite capable of player faster with Connor, but in his own he loves to slow it down a little and look for that perfect pass.

    Do we see a speed line and then a slower possession line? Leon is the change up.

    And Milan, i think he will bounce, and he’s still good for 40 points. He’s going to play somewhere and 90% chance he’s on Leon’s left side. With this in mind they have to have an above average right winger or Leon may be sunk again.

  26. Jordan says:

    I think JP is could be a lock to play with Nuge and McDavid next year…

    …If the Oilers sign him to a 3-4 year extension this year at reasonable money. (say 2M per over 3 years)

    I think the Oilers are REALLY gunshy to put young players with McDavid because its so friggin hard to identify how much they are being carried by 97.

    I think Leon’s contract reflects the danger of playing players in their ELCs on McDavid’s wing.

    I think the only players who should be playing opposite McDavid are players on longer-term contracts.

    If you’re in a contract year, there’s no way I’d structure the roster to have you playing with McPoints.

    All it does is cost me money.

  27. JimmyV1965 says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    I like Riley Nash, he was veey effective for Boston last year, but I’d be worried about his price tag, likely North of $3 million/yr.I would prefer him to Strome as a 3C.

    I would think all of Strome, Kassian and Cagguila would have to be moved, though and I would look for draft picks in return.I would target Nash, Matt Calvert, Grabner, Czarnik and Matt Peca and the roster would look like this at Forward:

    RNH – McD – Rattie
    Calvert – Drai – JP
    Lucic – Nash – Grabner
    JJ/Aberg – Czarnik/Peca – Czarnik/Aberg

    I know that Calvert is more suited as a 3LW, but consider him a placeholder for Lucic, in a sense.

    As far as D goes, I am at a bit of a loss… The pending Nurse contract and the NMC’s for Russell and Sekera are a big issue, IMO.So I am stuck here: either Klefbom or Nurse (I lean towards Klef due to his injury history) + Yamamoto + 2019 1st for Erik Karlsson.Would Ottawa do this deal?

    Nurse – Karlsson
    Sekera – Larsson
    Russell – Benning

    What is it about Nash that you like better than Strome? He’s four years older and other than last year, has never put up even Strome numbers. To me, Nash is a UFA you sign on the second week of free agency to a bargain bin deal.

  28. Munny says:

    JimmyV1965,

    He has already dissed the org as a draft pick. Why would he sign now? Why would we want him to?

  29. OiLNATION says:

    If cap goes up to 82 mil then signing vanek, derek ryan and a depth player like czarnik or pirri should be good enough after signing our rfas.
    Lines would look like:
    Nuge-Mcd-Rattie
    Lucic-Drai-Pulju
    Khaira-Strome-Vanek
    Caggiula- Ryan- Kassian
    Aberg and Pirri or Czarnik

  30. OriginalPouzar says:

    Whether we can “project it” or not, I expect Puljijarvi to materially surpass 15 goals and 30 points.

    I am assuming he’ll play considerable time with Leon and receive standard PP time (perhaps more PP2 than PP1 but PP time nonetheless).

    I don’t know if I “expect” 25/25 – 30 but it wouldn’t surprise me.

    This is a year for Jesse to take a material step offensively – I assume he’ll be given the opportunity – it he starts with Strome on the 3rd line it will be up to Jesse to earn ice up the lineup.

    I would be disappointed with 30P in 82 games.

  31. OriginalPouzar says:

    Signing Czarnik seems like a low risk and good bet type of signing.

    Perhaps he can be convinced if we offer him a one-way deal for a couple of years.

    As long as it doesn’t break $1M, it has no risk on our cap – we can bury it in the minors.

    His current expiring one-year contract was a 2-way.

    A guaranteed take home of $1M (perhaps X2) could entice him.

    Similar to Pitlick who was enticed by the one-way with term from Dallas.

  32. OriginalPouzar says:

    geowal:
    Is there any reason to believe Riley Nash holds any ill will to the org from his past e person s with the club? I don’t recal any verbal that says whether or no his previous departure was strictly business or taken as a slight. Or perhaps more likely, the other way around, from the guys above Chia, like KLowe, MacT, Howson? Spite can be a powerful de-motivator.

    If I remember correctly, he wasn’t going to sign here because he didn’t see a good path to the NHL – he felt he was blocked. He was traded so that the org didn’t lose him for nothing (FLA should take note).

    If that foregoing is correct, there shouldn’t be ill-will.

  33. Munny says:

    OriginalPouzar: (FLA should take note).

    Thought that was a sure thing? lol, just teasing.

  34. OriginalPouzar says:

    Jordan:
    I think JP is could be a lock to play with Nuge and McDavid next year…

    …If the Oilers sign him to a 3-4 year extension this year at reasonable money. (say 2M per over 3 years)

    I think the Oilers are REALLY gunshy to put young players with McDavid because its so friggin hard to identify how much they are being carried by 97.

    I think Leon’s contract reflects the danger of playing players in their ELCs on McDavid’s wing.

    I think the only players who should be playing opposite McDavid are players on longer-term contracts.

    If you’re in a contract year, there’s no way I’d structure the roster to have you playing with McPoints.

    All it does is cost me money.

    There is merit to that, however, at the same time, the GM gives the coach a 23-man roster and the coach needs to deploy his roster, each and every night, in a way that he believes gives his team the best chance to win the game that night – if that includes an ELC player with McDavid then the coach has to play that ELC player with McDavid.

    Yes, it could lead to future contract implications (the job of the GM to mitigate, not the coach) but, at the same time, in the present it also leads to value contracts (where the ELC player is outperforming his cap hit).

  35. Munny says:

    OriginalPouzar: If I remember correctly, he wasn’t going to sign here because he didn’t see a good path to the NHL – he felt he was blocked. He was traded so that the org didn’t lose him for nothing (FLA should take note).

    If that foregoing is correct, there shouldn’t be ill-will.

    Btw, this wasn’t the case. The player and the organization had a conflict over his development path.

  36. OriginalPouzar says:

    JimmyV1965: Drafting the dman takes a level of patience that is challenging in Edmonton.

    Perhaps this is chaining? Darnell was kind of somewhat developed with patience (he wasn’t in the NHL in his draft plus 1 year).

    Also, we now have a decent group of prospect d-man that are matriculating in various leagues (in particular on the left side with Lagesson, Samorukov, Jones, etc. matriculating). I think it gives us the ability to draft a Ty Smith, for example, and allow him the time.

  37. OriginalPouzar says:

    Munny: Thought that was a sure thing?lol, just teasing.

    I sure thought it was – this guy can admit he was wrong (no choice on this one – pretty easy admission).

  38. OriginalPouzar says:

    Munny: Btw, this wasn’t the case. The player and the organization had a conflict over his development path.

    That’s not quite how I remember it but I definitely could be wrong and will take your info as truth.

    Thanks.

  39. Munny says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    I have these two buds who are Cats fans, and (like most fans) they were approaching the deadline with sheer cynicism over the situation…. as in, we hoped for the best, but it turned out like always.

  40. Munny says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    It was over staying at Cornell.

  41. VOR says:

    Woodguy v2.0: My memories of this song is necking with girls in highschool behind the old Woodbend Community Hall while “hall parties” raged on in the hall.

    Good times.

    After reading your comment I started trying to remember what I was doing in 1985 and who I was doing it with.

    I drew a total blank and when I listened to this song I got nothing. If I ever heard it before it didn’t stick.

    So I went online and started looking up chart topping hits of 1985 to see if they provoked a memory. Nada. Some of the songs I remember hearing but they weren’t attached to any personal memory. And then I played the song that hit the top of the charts in November of 1985.

    Two bars in I could remember every detail of that year. Amazing the power music has to burn itself into our memory. More amazing since it is the Worst Song of All Time.

    I warn you that while there is no music in this link the song it refers to is so evil listening to the first four words are enough to pull the song from the deepest recesses of your brain and turn it into a virulent ear worm.

    In fact, don’t read the link below if you are susceptible to ear worms.

    https://www.gq.com/story/oral-history-we-built-this-city-worst-song-of-all-time

  42. JimmyV1965 says:

    When it comes to UFAs, I think we should wait a few days and sign whoever is available to cheap deals. Versteeg, Riley Nash, Derek Ryan, Drew Stanford, there’s usually someone like this available for cheap. I wouldn’t pay $2 mill for any of those guys.

  43. JimmyV1965 says:

    Munny:
    JimmyV1965,

    He has already dissed the org as a draft pick. Why would he sign now? Why would we want him to?

    I have no interest in Riley Nash outside a cheap contract.

  44. JimmyV1965 says:

    OriginalPouzar: Perhaps this is chaining? Darnell was kind of somewhat developed with patience (he wasn’t in the NHL in his draft plus 1 year).

    Also, we now have a decent group of prospect d-man that are matriculating in various leagues (in particular on the left side with Lagesson, Samorukov, Jones, etc. matriculating). I think it gives us the ability to draft a Ty Smith, for example, and allow him the time.

    This is true. I hope.

  45. Munny says:

    JimmyV1965: I have no interest in Riley Nash outside a cheap contract.

    I know. I was adding my disagreement to your disagreement.

  46. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Riley Nash is exactly the type of signing to avoid unless he’s coming cheap.

    His previous career high was 25 points. On a team like the Oilers I would expect career production, meaning he probably isn’t as good as Strome and may be getting into that salary range and is 4 years older.

    Czarnik is more the type of signing that might surprise in a good way, far more upside.

    I hope PC can find a helpful vet or two and get everyone slotted into the right place on the depth chart with the right expectations of what they can bring.

    It’s better to be surprised if they exceed reasonable expectations than that they didn’t meet levels they have never reliably performed at. And please make sure they are healthy and haven’t lost a step.

  47. digger50 says:

    When I was 16 I went down to Klondike Days to work the RootBeer stands. They were owned by an ex pro.

    Who wants ICE COLD ROOTBEER

    And my keg was right beside the tilt -a-whirl. I think that was the name of it. The tilt a whirl had a soundtrack that consisted of 6 songs. On repeat. ALL day and late into the evening. Edit, not the tilt a whirl but had an avalanche or ice sort of theme going on, went around up and down. (You sit on the outside so your date comes sliding over to you.)

    And in the middle of each or each ride a guy would come over the mike with a heavy British accent and say “do you want TO GO FASTER?!!!”

    Over, and over until to this day I’m still fully brainwashed.

    Number one: Flock of Seaguls – I Ran
    2 – John Cougar – Hurts so Good
    3 – men at work – Who can it be now
    4 – Human League – Don’t you want me baby
    5 – GoGos – our lips are sealed
    6 – Billy Squire – The Stroke

    Sometimes they let me play the tunes at minor hockey games. A guy says to me one time “you seem to play these certain songs over and over”

    Uhh really? Never noticed

  48. JimmyV1965 says:

    Munny: I know. I was adding my disagreement to your disagreement.

    👍

  49. bendelson says:

    digger50,

    The Polar Express.
    When the operator yelled “do you want to go faster”, I was the one yelling “for the love of God, No!”

    *edit: there was a good chance I was also the one puking in the garbage can beside the root beer stand b/c that damn operator never listened and always went faster…

  50. Scungilli Slushy says:

    Chiarelli should be familiar with Czarnik, so there might be an avenue there if Pete likes the lad.

  51. €√¥£€^$ says:

    JimmyV1965,

    He is a RHC, better face-off man, better defensively, can play both PK and PP and is a better skater. Basically it comes down to he gives up less than he gives and is more versatile. He would be a perfect 3C. Maybe he can be signed for under $3 million, but that depends on the competition for his services.

    When Nash was drafted he was a younger man and wanted to finish his education, the Oilers were concerned that he wouldn’t continue developing at Cornell and wanted him in the AHL. They were afraid of losing him for nothing, so they traded him for 2nd Round pick. Also, McDavid wasn’t an Oiler. He has Albertan roots and he would be familiar with Keith Gretzky. I don’t see this history as an issue at all.

  52. €√¥£€^$ says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    You are likely thinking of Rieder. Nash wanted to finish college, Oilers wanted him in the AHL.

  53. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Munny: Woodguy has a hickie, Woodguy has a hickie….

    lol

    Ahhh hickeys.

    They were awesome

  54. Munny says:

    Woodguy v2.0: Ahhh hickeys.

    They were awesome

    Girls be all like, “it’s a curling iron burn” or “where’s my turtleneck (in June lol)” etc.

    Guys be like, “Dudes! Check out the hickie I got from so-and-so!”

  55. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    VOR: After reading your comment I started trying to remember what I was doing in 1985 and who I was doing it with.

    I drew a total blank and when I listened to this song I got nothing. If I ever heard it before it didn’t stick.

    So I went online and started looking up chart topping hits of 1985 to see if they provoked a memory. Nada. Some of the songs I remember hearing but they weren’t attached to any personal memory. And then I played the song that hit the top of the charts in November of 1985.

    Two bars in I could remember every detail of that year. Amazing the power music has to burn itself into our memory. More amazing since it is the Worst Song of All Time.

    I warn you that while there is no music in this link the song it refers to is so evil listening to the first four words are enough to pull the song from the deepest recesses of your brain and turn it into a virulent ear worm.

    In fact, don’t read the link below if you are susceptible to ear worms.

    https://www.gq.com/story/oral-history-we-built-this-city-worst-song-of-all-time

    Songs and smells.

    Nothing brings back memories in a flood like those two.

  56. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    digger50:
    When I was 16 I went down to Klondike Days to work the RootBeer stands. They were owned by an ex pro.

    Who wantsICE COLD ROOTBEER

    And my keg was right beside the tilt -a-whirl. I think that was the name of it. The tilt a whirl had a soundtrack that consisted of 6 songs. On repeat. ALL day and late into the evening. Edit, not the tilt a whirl but had an avalanche or ice sort of theme going on, went around up and down. (You sit on the outside so your date comes sliding over to you.)

    And in the middle of each or each ride a guy would come over the mike with a heavy British accent and say “do you want TO GO FASTER?!!!”

    Over, and over until to this day I’m still fully brainwashed.

    Number one: Flock of Seaguls – I Ran
    2 – John Cougar – Hurts so Good
    3 – men at work – Who can it be now
    4 – Human League – Don’t you want me baby
    5 – GoGos – our lips are sealed
    6 – Billy Squire – The Stroke

    Sometimes they let me play the tunes at minor hockey games. A guy says to me one time “you seem to play these certain songs over and over”

    Uhh really?Never noticed

    Great story.

    I used to work at The Original Cookie Company at WEM.

    It was right at the bottleneck at the Ice Palace.

    The Ice Palace had 6 songs on rotation as well.

    I’ve heard the song Panama by Van Galen 29882539 times.

    It’s such a poor vapid song too.

    I like the songs on your list tho…..

  57. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    There are too many people who question Zadina to have him cold at 3.

    He might be the high bust at the draft.

    I’d be so risk adverse at the draft that I’d avoid him.

    Him having a terrible combine *might* make him slide.

    This should be a fun draft to watch.

  58. OriginalPouzar says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    You are likely thinking of Rieder.Nash wanted to finish college, Oilers wanted him in the AHL.

    You are 100% correct – absolutely.

    My mistake.

    Thank you.

  59. OriginalPouzar says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    There are too many people who question Zadina to have him cold at 3.

    He might be the high bust at the draft.

    I’d be so risk adverse at the draft that I’d avoid him.

    Him having a terrible combine *might* make him slide.

    This should be a fun draft to watch.

    There is no realistic chance he slides anywhere near 10, is there?

    I mean, sure, maybe he could slide to 4-5 but not farther, right?

    I can’t wait for this draft – I know more about the top 10-15 than any other draft in my 41 years.

  60. New Improved Darkness says:

    Taylor Hall was not a good fit for a franchise whose regular off-season gig—only one hiatus in the last decade—was headlining the Festival of Management Deck chairs.

    For Taylor to reach his ultimate self he required total exposure, such as New Jersey rising or falling with Taylor’s hand at the helm replacing a player he regarded as a straight-across snub.

    Right from the moment we won the golden ball, I was doubtful that Connor’s arrival was going to improve Taylor. Taylor improves Taylor, when exposed to the brightest spotlight, towing the maximum load. He has said himself that he never much looked to coaching to burnish his ultimate edge. As much as Taylor is a transcendent skill and a great guy on his own terms, the Toews is not strong in this one. With Toews, it’s the coach going “you know, I really don’t know what to offer the guy, he seems to already notice what I’m about to tell him, before I find time to deliver the message, so I just tell him ‘you know that adjustment you made last night?’ and he goes ‘yeah, sorry it took me so long to see the light, my bad’ ”.

    What ever incoming (or nearly outgoing) GM tends to do is roll the die on an FLC (franchise limiting contract). Looooooooch. Get it right, you look like a genius; get it wrong, the assembled Festival deadheads perform another glorious nitrogen/oxygen/argon rearrangement dance (complete with rawhide thongs pegged through the skin of their chests, from which they bleed the team colours).

    The problem is, success is when you stop dancing—this might actually be a big part of the lesson the dance delivers to young Cree or Blackfoot hot blood, that sometimes it really feels good to stop. I visited a Cree or Blackfoot site near Calgary (oh how my memory fades) back when I was nine or ten, as part of a school field trip. That same year we also saw a bunch of rocks in aquariums that glowed under black light (cool), and examined up close a Hutterite mechanical chicken plucker (basically an iron maiden with an axle instead of a hinge, and what is a hinge but an axle off to the side?)

    Now, I wasn’t that impressed with the adults when we visited the dusty Cree/Blackfoot teepee showcase. “Wait a minute here—you can’t just show me that crazy chest hook and not explain why any person would ever do this.” But they didn’t. They didn’t even try. Different strokes for different folks just kind of hung in the air, unspoken. Not even, “well, we sure know why they did it after we arrived”. “We” is not ambiguous here—the modern Japanese are less racially homogeneous than my elementary school field trips. For I knew at that age (or any of the rest of my classmates), national borders functioned like the invisible force fields in Star Trek, like the one that trapped Sulu in the agony booth. We had by then heard of other countries, especially dinnertime countries like Turkey and Chile. I met my first German at a summer church camp. I think the parents hung around for the first night at that one. So before my parents left, I had a chance to say “someone in my tent said something strange about the Germans last night”. For that observation, I got a four-dagger double shush. “What?” I said, so as not to abandon my inquiry with no question asked whatsoever. “Ancient history, not worth talking about.” Okay Dad, German history is for them to know, and me to find out. Gotcha. My Dad seemed to believe that the best time to learn something was after you already knew better. Well, I suppose it worked, in its own way. At that age, even if I had wanted to launch a playground melanin-bomb—against what target, I have to ask, Swedes whose eyes weren’t exactly the right shade of blue?—I couldn’t have mustered the right words.

    Flash forward, the first time someone in my junior school called me “gay”, he was quite right, I had no idea what the word meant. (It didn’t take a playground Einstein to size up my eldest-child minister’s-son adult vocabulary deficit—it went right across the board and spilled over onto the next pitch.) By puberty, I was nursing one of the largest AVDs history has ever recorded.

    But I sure hadn’t forgotten the Cree chesthook. Why exactly would someone do that, just hang there, hour upon agonizing hour, bleeding the team colours? Now I know. Good things come to those who wait. There’s a certain honour in rending your own flesh—for a change.

    (continued)

  61. New Improved Darkness says:

    Over the last week I’ve been reading Why We Sleep (2017) by Matthew Walker.

    Matthew P. Walker is a British scientist and professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the impact of sleep on human health and disease.

    He was previously a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is also the founder and director of the Center for Human Sleep Science.

    He has received numerous funding awards from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, and is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences.

    He has published over 100 scientific research studies and has been featured on numerous television and radio outlets, including 60 Minutes, National Geographic, NOVA, NPR and the BBC.

    Just to give the measure of how astounding this book is, I wouldn’t believe half of what I was reading if his CV were the smallest iota less impressive.

    Bad news for sleep-deficit warriors. You can easily take ten years off your life at the other end. Half of society no longer even knows what it feels like to operate on a full tank. Six hours a night feels normal. But it isn’t. The number of people who function at their best level, in full health, on six hours a night or less is on the same order as the number of people with multiple sclerosis. (Matthew has a standing offer to test any hard-core sleep-deficit braggart in his sleep lab; some braggarts showed up, only humble pie departed).

    The second bad news is that consistency matters. Even one short night lights up the “publish” button on seemingly any study he’s ever conducted.

    Example: if you cram hard, then get a short sleep, a week later you’ll remember 30% less than someone who crammed less hard, and got a full night.

    Page 215: Decoding facial microexpressions. Mind-blowing.

    The sleep-deprived brain can mistake friends for foes — July 2015

    On a more positive note, researchers recorded the electrical brain activity of the participants during their full night of sleep, and found that their quality of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) or dream sleep correlated with their ability to accurately read facial expressions.

    Previous research by Walker has found that REM sleep serves to reduce stress neurochemicals and soften painful memories.

    “The better the quality of dream sleep, the more accurate the brain and body was at differentiating between facial expressions,” Walker said. “Dream sleep appears to reset the magnetic north of our emotional compass.

    About PTSD. Many sufferers recover within a few weeks if given a heart medication that also (originally as a side-effect) lowers the levels of norepinephrine in the brain during sleep (norepinephrine, which mediates anxiety, is normally blocked during REM sleep). Turns out, REM sleep processes trauma into a less visceral form, but only when neurological norepinephrine levels are sufficiently low. Who knew?

    This book is amazing. I could go on for hours.

    Page 317: William Stewart Halsted, responsible for the prevailing medical practice of sleep-starving medical residents (e.g. the thirty-hour shift), had legendary stamina—and a secret cocaine addiction (one rehabilitation stint substituting morphine for cocaine discharged him with two addictions).

    Facing government threats that would apply federally enforced work hours due to the extent of the damning evidence, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education made the following recommendations. First-year residents would be limited to (1) working no more than an 80-hour week … (2) working no more than 24 hours nonstop, and (3) performing [no more than] one overnight on-call shift every third night.

    [At this time of this book, this rule has only been applied to the first year of resident training.]

    Why? Because the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education—the elite board of high-powered physicians that dictates the American residency training structure—stated that data proving the dangers of insufficient sleep had only been gathered in residents in their first year of the program. (p. 321)

    Recall, a few moments ago, my childhood incomprehension over the self-inflicted Cree chesthook? Well, it did not adequately prepare me for the above passage.

    And they say that doctors make the worst patients—knowing too much about their own politics policies, it’s no wonder. I sure wouldn’t want to find myself on the receiving side of arrogance, supercharged.

    In spite of these reservations, one must admit that the results of the experiment appear to support Dr. Semmelweis’s opinion, but certainly one must admit no more.

    That’s Danish obstetrician Carl Edvard Marius Levy arguing that we mustn’t prematurely enlarge Ignaz Semmelweis’s narrow observations on childbed fever to institute medical hand-washing generally.

    That just about sums this book up. Many will read it, few will listen across the board. Sleep-deficit warriors have become modern society’s unwashed medical hands. The battle to reform this will last a full generation, or more. How the stuffed shirts of the Accreditation Council miss their tobacco.

    Cramming: bad for retention. Afternoon coffee: bad for retention. Evening alcohol: bad for retention (and creativity).

    But I knew most of this already, perforce.

    (continued)

  62. New Improved Darkness says:

    The part of the book that struck home for me—on my eleventy-first pass through the sleep literature—was the new research on NREM sleep and creativity.

    During NREM sleep, the brain relaxes constraints on long-range association. You might call this “out of the box thinking”, the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that lands you inside-the-fox, if indulged at the wrong moment (like, for example, that sneaky drop pass to nowhere barely inside the zone).

    Now here’s the thing. When I write, whenever I write something that someone might say in a wide-awake kind of way, I’m not happy. For the years I spent free-running (which made a loud, sustained ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa sound here on Lowetide) I was constantly pushing my mind to function more like I was in a constant state of waking REM sleep, always slanting toward the distal connection over the proximal; the many connections over the few.

    At one point, reading this book, I bolted upright (all the better to cranially dock with my high-joltage brain-juice delivery system) and went “Jesus Christ! Was I self-medicating?” Then I slept on the matter for eight orthodox hours (as I do routinely in my new life) and then I woke up in the morning, only I still don’t know.

    So I came here, and I went ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa, as I used to do, and I still don’t know.

    As it happens, I also have on my bedside table a book titled Expressive Writing: Words That Heal (2014) by James W. Pennebaker (that’s a joke—no book ever lands on my bedside by anything remotely approaching happenstance). This, too, cures PTSD: it’s the use of writing to accomplish—I guess—what your REM sleep is sadly failing to achieve. And it’s the weirdest little book, because the first author (Pennebaker) basically says in the introduction: the rest of this book, by my second author, is completely worthless, IMHO, but readers seem to want it, so we tacked it on (the rest of the book is most of the book, and mainly consists of variously elaborated emotional-writing exercises much in the spirit of the Kama Sutra—as before, yet different—in a tranquil room with eagle-carved moldings).

    Pennebaker had a grad student (iirc) who wrote a piece of software to analyze all these emotional essays they collected during their research years. They made a surprising discovery: you could really tell a lot about whether a person would progress emotionally by the use of the smallest words. This lead Pennebaker to write The Secret Life of Pronouns (2011). (This precedes the other book’s publication date, I think, only because of its re-issue with its worthless eagle-carved moldings.) In the way I used to write (sadly, I do less of this now) the smaller, the better. You can’t smuggle true mischief into a sentence on the back of a long word (though an incongruous, sufficiently-coiled long word makes a fine joy-buzzer). I originally engaged with Pennebaker through “he”, “she”, and “it” and then lateralled into his PTSD book.

    True story: a month ago I was sorting through my old files on computational linguistics—many articles photocopied at UBC and UVic in the mid-nineties when the internet was still but a puppy—and every fourth article was written by Robert Mercer et. al. A bunch of these guys (including Mercer) subsequently wound up at Renaissance Technologies.

    Renaissance’s flagship Medallion fund, which is run mostly for fund employees, “is famed for one of the best records in investing history, returning more than 35 percent annualized over a 20-year span”.

    That’s Madoff territory, but without the pyramid.

    By October 2015, Renaissance had roughly $65 billion worth of assets under management, most of which belong to employees of the firm.

    Some of you will recognize Mercer’s name immediately; the rest of you—go back to sleep. I officially sign off on this matter with the infamous quadruple eye dagger, double shush that nourished my all-world teenage AVDD (adult vocabulary deficit disorder).

    (continued)

  63. New Improved Darkness says:

    My final anecdote from Matthew Walker concerns human IQ. The quadruple eye-dagger double-shush of my childhood church-camp over that weird kid with the obvious German accent doesn’t begin to dent the controversy surrounding this topic.

    Sigh. So here’s another true story. I was born in the same year as Jordan Peterson, both of us in Edmonton, and spent the first four years of my life up in the Peace River county—not quite as far north of Grande Prairie as Peterson—who remained in Fairview through his high school years. I’ve never encountered a controversial public figure before where I’ve so intensely felt half the same, and yet half different. What’s bred in the bone, etc.

    This is all way too radioactive, so I will only drop a few names, for the hazmat inclined: Jordan Peterson, Charles Murray, Richard Haier, and Bryan Roche. These will easily triangulate all the rest.

    Bryan Roche would not normally be included on such a list because he’s a crank—or perhaps not—there’s a glimmer of a possibly that it’s too soon to tell.

    Many, many people will tell you they have an intervention to raise IQ—as children/as adults, before birth/after the grave. Some of these claims are not true. Generally speaking, 99% of these claims are not true. Whatever modern IQ measures, it’s one stubborn mule.

    What does increase your test scores, as a teenager, is waking up for school later in the morning—consistently enough to gain admission to an entirely higher grade of ivy and lace. (Teenagers naturally wake up later than adults, and if they don’t, they lose a lot of extremely valuable REM sleep.)

    Page 227: Jeffrey Ellenbogen did a study which showed that REM sleep turbo-charges relational cognition. In Walker’s book—on this page—the notation is effed up. Walker designates learning that A is preferential to B (for example, not choosing my teenage self to join your vocabulary team—no need to even mention the soccer team—insofar as it concerned any adult subject matter) with the notation A>B. That notation looks harmless? Right? Wrong.

    So, you learn that A is preferential to B. And then they teach you (in an experimental setting not designed to make this strikingly obvious) that B is preferential to C. What the experimental protocol does not teach you by training reinforcement is that preferentiality is transitive (A beats B and B beats C implies that A beats C). In real life this is generally true, except when it isn’t: nontransitive dice. In hockey, we say that shit team C “has their number” when they consistently beat awesome team A (for C=Chiarelli and A=Anaheim, to name a recent flash-in-the-pan one-trick-pony).

    Without REM sleep, subjects—after separately being trained on a preferential basis that A>B and B>C—are slow to conclude that A>C. After REM sleep, transitivity reigns. This can be related as A) putting together distant pieces, or B) “turbo-charging” ahead to an unfounded mathematical premise (that presumed transitivity thing). Whichever it is, REM FTW, as Walker relates this. (What the white man calls “scare quotes” were originally known as hatchet marks. Dedicated to every fucking brochure that turbo-charges any life outcome.)

    The weird thing here concerns Bryan Roche. Intensified relational training is the core of his IQ-boosting regime. Roche propounds that relations are the actual foundation stone upon which intelligence rests. And then last night I’m reading that this is all joined at the hip with REM sleep, the only other intervention that incontrovertibly improves test scores (which are not necessarily g-loaded, only they probably are).

    Too weird.

    New Evidence That IQ Can Be Increased With Brain Training — 2016

    Pairs well with your preferred Initial Coin Offering.

    20% of University Students Use Financial Aid to Buy Cryptocurrency — 23 March 2018

    Well, no, I don’t really think Roche is the IQO of 2017—but then again—I’m not yet sure.

    Like Jordan Peterson, it’s another maximal psychotic divide.

    On the other hand, this new regular+adequate sleep bible, it’s a slam dunk—though unfortunately, a blink-and-you-miss-it nothing-but-net slam dunk that won’t be heard around the world, not anytime soon enough.

  64. ArmchairGM says:

    OriginalPouzar: Perhaps this is chaining? Darnell was kind of somewhat developed with patience (he wasn’t in the NHL in his draft plus 1 year).

    Also, we now have a decent group of prospect d-man that are matriculating in various leagues (in particular on the left side with Lagesson, Samorukov, Jones, etc. matriculating). I think it gives us the ability to draft a Ty Smith, for example, and allow him the time.

    We have just as many on the right side too: Persson, Berglund and Bear – and these guys are much closer to the NHL than the LD’s.
    Which is why I wouldn’t mind drafting a “project” – trade 10 and 40 to Minnesota for 24 and Spurgeon, then draft Merkley. He might be three years away, but that’s fine by me.

  65. leadfarmer says:

    ArmchairGM,

    And why would Minnesota do this?

  66. Richard S.S. says:

    Why acquire another Smurf when bigger, smarter, stronger and faster may also be available? Taking the best athlete/option available is not always the best choice. There will only ever be a very, very few people that can skate like Connor McDavid. Why give up something just to get someone who skates fast? Acquire people who can skate well.

  67. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM: We have just as many on the right side too: Persson, Berglund and Bear – and these guys are much closer to the NHL than the LD’s.
    Which is why I wouldn’t mind drafting a “project” – trade 10 and 40 to Minnesota for 24 and Spurgeon, then draft Merkley. He might be three years away, but that’s fine by me.

    I would say that Bear and Lagesson are the closest followed by Berglund. Samorukov, Jones, etc. are projects.

    Its really too early to tell if Persson is even a real prospect – one full year in the best league in Sweden should tell a story – he could jump.

  68. Munny says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    You are likely thinking of Rieder.Nash wanted to finish college, Oilers wanted him in the AHL.

    The actual reason behind the Rieder-Kessey trade isn’t known. It was played as a hockey trade at the time by the teams and the MSM.

    It seemed so lopsided though that rumours began to pop up. One is that Rieder felt he was blocked and asked for the trade. Another is that he was demanding 2nd round money.

    But we don’t really know.

  69. digger50 says:

    bendelson:
    digger50,

    The Polar Express.
    When the operator yelled “do you want to go faster”, I was the one yelling “for the love of God, No!”

    *edit:there was a good chance I was also the one puking in the garbage can beside the root beer stand b/c that damn operator never listened and always went faster…

    That’s it. Polar Express. Good memory.

    Good memories.

  70. JustWatt says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    This is excellent. I happen to be a nearly 4th year medical student interested in psychiatry. It’s ironic that the reason I’d really like to read this book you’re recounting is also the reason that I really can’t. It has been a constant source of frustration. “Here’s how important sleep is for learning, mental health, and overall well-being. Also, here’s more learning than can be done in a 16 hour day and don’t forget the test is next Friday.” Virtually all of my medical training has been of the “always cramming on <6 hours of sleep" variety. It's also my experience that many doctors fail to practice as they preach.

  71. Munny says:

    New Improved Darkness: In the way I used to write (sadly, I do less of this now)

    “Sadly” is correct. You’ve been missed. Write more often.

    Two things:

    1. I devour everything Jordan Peterson puts out.
    2. Insomnia is the curse of my life.

  72. Bank Shot says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    You are likely thinking of Rieder.Nash wanted to finish college, Oilers wanted him in the AHL.

    That can’t be right.

    The Oilers traded Nash at the draft in 2010. He signed a pro contract and joined the Hurricanes AHL team that fall.

    I think its clear that he forced the trade. We will always be speculating on the reason. He was coming into a hockey club that just finished last place so its not like you can say there wasn’t any opportunities for him.

    Had he went to the Oilers farm team he almost certainly would have gotten some NHL games in 2010-2011.

  73. Scungilli Slushy says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    That was a fun read, thanks.

  74. Munny says:

    Bank Shot,

    This is from the Kamloops paper just after the Nash trade:

    Edmonton general manager Steve Tambellini told Matheson: “I didn’t want him getting into his senior year of school, then when it was over, deciding he didn’t want to play for us. . . . By trading Riley now, we get the 46th pick, five spots better.”

    Nash says he understands the Oilers’ frustration but . . .

    “It was just a decision I had to make,” he adds. “Even now, I don’t know if I’m ready to step out yet. I guess it kind of put them in a tough spot, which I feel bad about. But, in the end, I have to try and make a career out of this, so . . .”

    What made things that much tougher was the presence of MacGregor, the former Kamloops Blazers general manager who makes his home in Kamloops.

    “We reffed lacrosse together a lot,” Nash says. “He’s a great guy and I felt bad because I know him fairly well and I respect his opinion to the utmost. I wish it could have worked out.”

    Nash has played three seasons with the Big Red – he has put up 102 points, including 37 goals, in 102 games – but remains undecided about returning for his senior season.

    http://www.kamloopsnews.ca/sports/local/nash-has-carolina-and-cornell-on-his-mind-1.1249024

  75. Munny says:

    Lol… Vegas has forced every team to raise the bar on their pregame productions.

    #wheeloffortune #buyahowl

  76. Fiveinatrailer says:

    Munny: “Sadly” is correct. You’ve been missed. Write more often.

    Two things:

    1. I devour everything Jordan Peterson puts out.
    2. Insomnia is the curse of my life.

    I’ve lurked on LT for probably 10 years and have maybe posted three times (stupid iPhones)

    Shift work is such a double edged sword. Combined with emergency service is a recipe for PTSD. All the old guys are either angry, tired or divorced. Sleep is crucial to a happy life. No sleep lowers testosterone etc which compounds the issue. For all the quantifying done here:

    Ptsd + shift work + age + low T + kids :)= a very tough go

    It’s only now that I realized the damage. But hey, 9 years left!

    As per Jordan Peterson, there was a very good counter argument to his summaries in the Toronto star last week. I have a catholic revulsion to anyone who claims to have all the answers (included most religions) and deals in absolute blacks and whites.
    ——

    Now that I’ve learned to log in, I’d like to say LT you’re a gem. You inspire me to create flowing prose with great back stories and emotion.

    I can’t believe it’s been 10 years! Since before ON back on Hf boards after the probger fiasco.

  77. Munny says:

    Not going to count

  78. Munny says:

    Fiveinatrailer: I have a catholic revulsion to anyone who claims to have all the answers (included most religions) and deals in absolute blacks and whites.

    This is not a description of Peterson. I’m guessing you’ve never actually watched one of his University lectures or you would know this. Agreed on the sleep stuff. Damn important.

  79. Rondo says:

    Munny,

    So what you’re saying ….

  80. Lowetide says:

    Fiveinatrailer: I’ve lurked on LT for probably 10 years and have maybe posted three times (stupid iPhones)

    Shift work is such a double edged sword. Combined with emergency service is a recipe for PTSD. All the old guys are either angry, tired or divorced.Sleep is crucial to a happy life. No sleep lowers testosterone etc which compounds the issue. For all the quantifying done here:

    Ptsd + shift work + age + low T + kids :)= a very tough go

    It’s only now that I realized the damage.But hey, 9 years left!

    As per Jordan Peterson, there was a very good counter argument to his summaries in the Toronto star last week. I have a catholic revulsion to anyone who claims to have all the answers (included most religions) and deals in absolute blacks and whites.
    ——

    Now that I’ve learned to log in, I’d like to say LT you’re a gem. You inspire me to create flowing prose with great back stories and emotion.

    I can’t believe it’s been 10 years! Since before ON back on Hf boards after the probger fiasco.

    Awesome! Welcome!

  81. €√¥£€^$ says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    You have been missed, need moar NID around here!

    A couple of years ago I had read about the role sleep actually performs, which is to “reboot the hard drive” in a sense. As part of this process the brain shrinks in size by about 60% during sleep the mechanism enables waste materials/toxins to be flushed out/removed.

    I usually get about 5-6 hrs of sleep a night, but my curse is that if my sleep is interrupted at any point, it feels like I have barely slept. And I am a very light sleeper, not a good combination.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sleep-shrinks-the-brain-rsquo-s-synapses-to-make-room-for-new-learning/

    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brain-may-flush-out-toxins-during-sleep

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/05/31/sleep-tool-for-creativity.aspx

  82. Munny says:

    Rondo:
    Munny,

    So what you’re saying ….

    Lol!

  83. Munny says:

    I just want to say that knowing the deep fundamental importance of sleep does not help one actually sleep, lol.

  84. Fiveinatrailer says:

    Munny:
    I just want to say that knowing the deep fundamental importance of sleep does not help one actually sleep, lol.

    “And knowing is half the battle”
    That’s what I remember from 1985.
    That and falco…

  85. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Munny,

    Agreed

  86. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Fiveinatrailer,

    I thought Falco was transcendent.

    My son introduced me to a metal version of Rock Me Amadeus about 2 weeks ago, lol

    https://youtu.be/JXCQVLjjZfs

    But then again some might consider the use of an accordion in a metal song transcendent.

    Or how about the transcendent dance moves and video editing

    https://youtu.be/8-bgiiTxhzM

  87. JustWatt says:

    €√¥£€^$: A couple of years ago I had read about the role sleep actually performs, which is to “reboot the hard drive” in a sense. As part of this process the brain shrinks in size by about 60% during sleep the mechanism enables waste materials/toxins to be flushed out/removed.

    Just for clarity’s sake, your article states that 60% of the brain’s synapses are wiped clean, something akin to deleting files on a computer. It uses the term shrink several times to describe the process so it’s definitely confusing and misleading but our brains don’t actually shrink in volume while we sleep.

  88. Munny says:

    OV scores. No idea why Fleury threw the puck into the corner rather than freezing it.

  89. Munny says:

    Fiveinatrailer: “And knowing Ian half the battle”
    That’s what I remember from 1985.
    That and falco…

    Lol, my Pa actually made me go to the theatre version of Amadeus at The Citadel in 1984. Which wasn’t a lot different than the Falco video.

  90. Munny says:

    €√¥£€^$,

    That is awesome!

  91. Munny says:

    This game needed that goal.

  92. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Lowetide,

    Sade is awesome, she was so unique and easy on the ears and eyes

  93. €√¥£€^$ says:

    JustWatt,

    I read a different article and found these to link. I will find it later, and link it, just heading out thedoor.

  94. Munny says:

    Caps make an odd man break count. Kuznetsov.

  95. OriginalPouzar says:

    Kustnetsov – bamn.

  96. OriginalPouzar says:

    I skipped those novel non-hockey posts but, given I go to the gym at 3am every day and get about 4 – 4.5 hours sleep/night, maybe I should go back and read them.

    Sigh – I’ve been feeling guilty about the lack of sleep – rest and recovery is the one part of my fitness and nutrition regime where I fail.

  97. Gerta Rauss says:

    The Beagle has landed-primary assist to the canine

  98. €√¥£€^$ says:

    JustWatt,

    In fact our brain cells actually shrink by 60% while we sleep, therefore our brains shrink considerably while we sleep. There haven’t been a lot of studies on this, and this isn’t the article that I had read on Mercola’s site, but I am not finding it at the moment, but this speaks to it:

    http://healthland.time.com/2013/10/17/your-brain-cells-shrink-while-you-sleep-and-thats-a-good-thing/

    Here are more articles about the importance of sleep and some strategies to help yourself if you are struggling, which I do:

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/10/09/brain-aging-factors.aspx

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/08/sleep-deprivation-brain-health.aspx

  99. leadfarmer says:

    Well Holtby decided the game wasn’t interesting enough

  100. €√¥£€^$ says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    I’ve been thinking of you as well, when it comes to this information, I think you do very well to only be running on the
    relatively low amounts of sleep that you do.

    Earlier this week I watched a Mark Wahlberg interview about his current workout routine. He is working out hard in preparation for filming “The Six Billion Dollar Man” later this year (6 million doesn’t turn you into the new and improved Steve Austin these days) and he goes to bed at 6:30, 7:30 if he is feeling really rebellious. He is up at 2:30 to work out.

  101. Munny says:

    leadfarmer:
    Well Holtby decided the game wasn’t interesting enough

    Yup.

  102. godot10 says:

    New Improved Darkness,

    at the Edge of Town.

  103. Munny says:

    This buying of time should be a delay of game penalty.

  104. OriginalPouzar says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    I’ve been thinking of you as well, when it comes to this information, I think you do very well to only be running on the
    relatively low amounts of sleep that you do.

    Earlier this week I watched a Mark Wahlberg interview about his current workout routine.He is working out hard in preparation for filming “The Six Billion Dollar Man” later this year (6 million doesn’t turn you into the new and improved Steve Austin these days) and he goes to bed at 6:30, 7:30 if he is feeling really rebellious.He is up at 2:30 to work out.

    That’s the exact same time i wake up to go to the gym – difference is, I’m in bed by 9:30-10.

    Yes, I agree, I’m doing well considering how little sleep i get, however, its far from optimal.

    I’m so dedicated to the fitness and nutrition regime its odd that I can’t seem to commit to the rest and recovery portion.

    While, there are pretty “set in stone” nutrition laws”, there is a ton of conflicting information with respect to fitness and building muscle. With that said, there one thing that is essentially 100% without debate is that rest and recovery is essential.

    There is nothing out there that says 4-5 hours of sleep/night and taking one rest day (from 90 minutes of heavy weights) every 2-3 weeks (and even doing light cardio on that rest day) and adding a second HIIT workout about 5-6 times/week is enough rest and recovery.

    I’m not even exaggerating (not am I bragging) – that’s my routine.

    I’m positive that its counterproductive and I’d probably gain more muscle if I cut 1/3 if not more out of it.

    Don’t do it though.

  105. OriginalPouzar says:

    DSP!!!!!

  106. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Impressive PK, what an effort by Eakin, wow.

    Bogus penalty on Englund, I think the NHL needs to incorporate a colour scheme for the sticks of each team, even just for the bottom half of the stick. The game is just so fast, I haven’t seen too many calls like this one, but there are plenty of high sticking calls called where team mates clip eachother.

  107. Munny says:

    DSP with a massive goal

  108. leadfarmer says:

    Theodore will have a great career but he’s costing them in this series

  109. OriginalPouzar says:

    Theodore has had a tough 2nd half of the game, that’s for sure.

    He must miss Trent Yawney…..

  110. Munny says:

    Gerta Rauss:
    The Beagle has landed-primary assist to the canine

    Wish he was an Oiler. Pretty sure LT has advocated for it a few times too.

  111. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Munny:
    DSP with a massive goal

    Good for him, for a player who was kind of unwanted not too long ago, he is doing very well! Love an underdog story!

    Underdog was a cartoon I remembered loving as a 7 or 8 yr old in B.C. (moved outside a small town W of Edmonton when I was 9). I guess I am too late to jump into the Flintstones/Hercules/Spiderman/Rocket Robin Hood conversation (also a big part of my childhood) from earlier in the week, lol.

    https://youtu.be/qHej4ZqZDwo?list=PLZs0gQed9tMSCEETV1bzJZ4m82aezYXhD

  112. €√¥£€^$ says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    I think I know your story somewhat, and you’ve made some impressive life changes. I am turning 50 in August and I had thoughts of starting a fitness regimen as I really need to drop 50 lbs and my basement is full of exercise equipment. I went from 220+ to 170 2 yrs ago, but it was a nutrion program where I had to buy food from this company. Wasn’t really compatible/sustainable in my life. I am back to 225, but had been up to 235.

    Any suggestions to start and sustain?

  113. Munny says:

    Caps fans deserved this victory.

  114. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Munny,

    Agreed

  115. Professor Q says:

    Fiveinatrailer: “And knowing is half the battle”
    That’s what I remember from 1985.
    That and falco…

    I wish to one day experience the Oilers atmosphere you all felt then, with McDavid et al.

  116. Professor Q says:

    €√¥£€^$: Good for him, for a player who was kind of unwanted not too long ago, he is doing very well!Love an underdog story!

    Underdog was a cartoon I remembered loving as a 7 or 8 yr old in B.C. (moved outside a small town W of Edmonton when I was 9).I guess I am too late to jump into the Flintstones/Hercules/Spiderman/Rocket Robin Hood conversation (also a big part of my childhood) from earlier in the week, lol.

    https://youtu.be/qHej4ZqZDwo?list=PLZs0gQed9tMSCEETV1bzJZ4m82aezYXhD

    I grew up with all the reruns in the 1990s, so it was like a double-dip of childhood experience for them. Johnny Quest, Pirates of Dark Water, the racing one, Scooby, and all that.

    Seeing all my 1990s cartoons switch to Boomerang (throwback cartoons that used to hold the 50s-80s for WB and Hanna-Barbera), Teletoon Retro, and the oldies Disney channel was quite a shock for me in the 00s…

  117. OriginalPouzar says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    I think I know your story somewhat, and you’ve made some impressive life changes.I am turning 50 in August and I had thoughts of starting a fitness regimen as I really need to drop 50 lbs and my basement is full of exercise equipment.I went from 220+ to 1702 yrs ago, but it was a nutrion program where I had to buy food from this company.Wasn’t really compatible/sustainable in my life.I am back to 225, but had been up to 235.

    Any suggestions to start and sustain?

    Yes, there were some changes made in my life – 6 years this August.

    With respect to losing weight (fat) always remember that fat gain and loss is a function of calories in vs. calories out – there are many nuances to this but energy balance (calories in vs. calories out) is the ultimate factor.

    What you put in to your system is going to be massively more important than the amount of exercise that you do. Yes, exercise will burn calories but you can always out eat your calorie burn. An hour on the treadmill may burn 500 calories – one can eat that back in a matter of minutes.

    As far as making changes go, I would start out with some little things – cut out the mindless extras – for example, what do you drink? Juices, soda, alcohol – massive calorie intake with no nutritional benefit and no ability to satiate you. Personally, I drink water, tons of it and only water – its helpful that booze is not an option for me.

    From a high level, be conscious of what you are eating and chances are you will make changes that cut down calories.

    One big one would be not eating after dinner except for maybe one portioned out snack. This has ZERO to do with eating before bed. There is nothing wrong with eating before bed and, in fact, I get 60% of my daily calories in the hours leading to bed (that’s just how I prefer to schedule my eating). The reason I say to not eat after dinner is, if you aren’t eating after dinner, you are cutting out all those calories that you would have been eating.

    Watch the sauces, dressings, etc. – calories.

    Drink water, lots and lots of water – you can trick your body in to thinking its “fuller” than it is with water.

    At the end of the day, I can give you a shit ton of information that, if followed, will get you down to 10% body fat (and even lower if you really want to work it) but I don’t think you need to go in to macro-nutrient portioning and advanced techniques – at the end of the day, just eat a bit less. Cut out mindless calories. Think about what you are eating.

  118. VOR says:

    An article on sleep and shrinking brains.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sleep-shrinks-the-brain-and-thats-a-good-thing/

    Just a quick note for those of you who have never held a human brain in their hands. Neuronal cells (axon and synapse) make up a very tiny portion of the mass of the human brain. So even though they shrink/are lost the effect on overall brain mass would be very minimal.

  119. €√¥£€^$ says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    Thanks OP,

    Water is my go to beverage. Other than Dragon Well tea (we inadvertantly bought a 5-year supply during my first visit to China 2 years ago, lol) I mainly drink water and don’t touch alcohol. I eat fairly healthy, but I do have a sweet tooth, which is a problem if I know that there is ice cream or cookies in the house. I know that I can follow a.program fairly religiously, but I don’t know what to follow.

    I am relatively active, but I need to be consistent I know. Perhaps there is a nutrition and a fitness program that you could point me to?

    My ultimate goal would be to achieve that 10% bf target and maintain it as long as possible. I am currently probably in the low 40’s, lol.

  120. €√¥£€^$ says:

    VOR,

    I apologize, I may have misunderstood the article that I had read (not unusual for my and my ADHD’d memory I am afraid) unfortunately I cannot seem to find it.

    Thank you for the clarification.

  121. VOR says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    VOR,

    I apologize, I may have misunderstood the article that I had read (not unusual for my and my ADHD’d memory I am afraid) unfortunately I cannot seem to find it.

    Thank you for the clarification.

    I personally think you captured the gist of this research quite well. Our brains do shrink at night. The researchers think it is partly an editing/memory clearing function. This is (if replicated and developed further) tremendously important research.

    Typically non scientists have no idea about the parts of the brain that aren’t obviously involved in cognitive functions. These other cells make up the vast majority of the brain’s biomass. The article you saw probably didn’t mention this fact either.

  122. VOR says:

    €√¥£€^$:
    OriginalPouzar,

    Thanks OP,

    Water is my go to beverage.Other than Dragon Well tea (we inadvertantly bought a 5-year supply during my first visit to China 2 years ago, lol) I mainly drink water and don’t touch alcohol.I eat fairly healthy, but I do have a sweet tooth, which is a problem if I know that there is ice cream or cookies in the house.I know that I can follow a.program fairly religiously, but I don’t know what to follow.

    I am relatively active, but I need to be consistent I know.Perhaps there is a nutrition and a fitness program that you could point me to?

    My ultimate goal would be to achieve that 10% bf target and maintain it as long as possible.I am currently probably in the low 40’s, lol.

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0193368

    The take home, for men a BF% below 15% increases risk of mortality by 55%. Optimal BF% is around 25%. I will leave you to figure out for yourself how risky a BF% in the 40s is for a man. But it is a lot worse than 10%.

  123. OriginalPouzar says:

    €√¥£€^$: 50

    Hmmmm, if you eat relatively healthy but and are active but have 50 pounds you could lose then I would posit that you are eating too much.

    Things changed for me about three years ago. I was the “cleanest” eater you had ever seen and a religious gym rat. I was in pretty darn good shape but could bust past the 15-16% body fat plateau and get the abs I always wanted.

    I read an article by Michael Matthews on muscleforlife.com that changed my fitness life. It was on “clean binging” and it described my life. Essentially, its all about calories in vs. calories out and about “how much” one is eating as opposed to “what” one is eating.

    For example, if one eats 2600 calories of vegetables and chicken breasts but only burns 2200 calories, the excess will be stored as fat. If one eats 1700 calories of Fruit Loops and doughnuts but burns 2200 calories, one will lose fat. Of course, in the second scneario, one will be so darn hungry it will be torture to not eat more.

    I figured out approximately how many calories I burn a day (https://www.muscleforlife.com/tdee-calculator/) and put myself in a daily 20% calorie deficit with eating 40% protein, 40% carbs, 20% fat and the fat, not that I had much, shredded off me.

    In 3 months, I lost 15 pounds (all fat, almost no muscle – via the bod pod test) and went from 16% body fat to 8%.

    I track every signal calorie and macro nutrient that I eat and hit certain numbers each and every day – I don’t chat.

    For the first while, it was absolutely exhausting trying to food plan and prep to hit those numbers but now its second nature and just part of my life. Its easy for me beause I am a huge creature of habit and I am willing (and actually like) eating the same things every day. I literally eat the exact same thing every day at the same times (I actually feel anxiousness if, for some reason, I have to go off plan, even if I’m 30 minutes off my food timing).

    My only “choices” are cod vs. sole vs. basa and sweet potato vs. yam.

    I would suggest as a first step to download myfitnesspal and track your food intake for a week or 10 days and get a real sense of how many calories you are eating. We can then go from there.

    Perhaps LT can help us exchange e-mail addresses as I’d be happy to chat about this on an ongoing basis.

    https://www.muscleforlife.com/muscle-for-life-success-ira-c/

  124. OriginalPouzar says:

    VOR: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0193368

    The take home, for men a BF% below 15% increases risk of mortality by 55%. Optimal BF% is around 25%. I will leave you to figure out for yourself how risky a BF% in the 40s is for a man. But it is a lot worse than 10%.

    I can’t imagine gaining 17% body fat (to take me to 25%) is going to make me live longer and I call that absolute bullshit.

    I’m not about to get in to posting studies back and forth as, in the fitness and nutrition area, once can find various studies to support anything.

  125. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    As per Cap Friendly’s twitter account:‏


    @CapFriendly
    56 minutes ago

    Edmonton #Oilers have signed pending Group 6 UFA d-man Keegan Lowe to a 2 year contract extension.

    2 year / 2-way deal
    $675,000 AAV at the NHL level

    2018-19: $650,000 / $150,000 ($200,000 guaranteed)
    2019-20: $700,000 / $225,000 ($250,000 guaranteed)

    I scrolled @edmontonoilers and didn’t see an announcement.

  126. VOR says:

    OriginalPouzar: I can’t imagine gaining 17% body fat (to take me to 25%) is going to make me live longer and I call that absolute bullshit.

    I’m not about to get in to posting studies back and forth as, in the fitness and nutrition area, once can find various studies to support anything.

    You are one of my favourite posters. And I mean no disrespect, as somebody who wrestled both Greco-Roman and Free Style at more than 20lbs below my body’s natural set point by getting my body fat down as low as 6% I know the incredible discipline and commitment it takes. I work with some world class body builders and see the hell they put themselves through. But what I did wasn’t healthy and what they are doing isn’t healthy.

    From the stuff you post about your training regime I can’t help think you are at some risk of short and long term problems. You self confess to:

    Lack of sleep
    Lack of rest and recovery time
    A body fat at or below 10%
    A history of addiction
    No external goals for your training
    No trainer or coach

    Does that seem like healthy behaviour to you?

    I have spent much of the last 30 years watching my older sister (the woman who raised me) slowly starve herself to death.

    -super high achiever
    -IQ off the conventional scale
    -former world class athlete
    -was a bit heavy in her late twenties
    -got down to under 10% BF and has stayed there for 40 years
    -did this by eating between 800 and 1000 calories a day and training 4 hours a day (or more) and of course no sugar or fat or salt
    -this morning she was up at 5 AM training
    -she walked 5 miles – with a walker
    -she was just released from hospital yesterday, her second stroke
    -her lungs can’t produce surfactant anymore so she can’t go out in public too much chance of infection
    -so she has a loop around her back yard
    -tomorrow she plans to add pumping iron and Yoga and Pilates back into her workout
    -whenever I send her any study suggesting being so thin might explain why she spends two to three months of every year in the hospital, can’t go out in public, and has to wear a parka even in the summer she sites some other study (did I mention she has eidetic memory) that proves she will live forever.

  127. VOR says:

    OP,

    As for the 17% body fat gain. From where you are on that curve getting to 15% would alleviate most of the risk.

  128. Bank Shot says:

    Woodguy v2.0:
    As per Cap Friendly’s twitter account:‏


    @CapFriendly56 minutes ago


    Edmonton #Oilers have signed pending Group 6 UFA d-man Keegan Lowe to a 2 year contract extension.

    2 year / 2-way deal
    $675,000 AAV at the NHL level

    2018-19: $650,000 / $150,000 ($200,000 guaranteed)
    2019-20: $700,000 / $225,000 ($250,000 guaranteed)

    I scrolled @edmontonoilers and didn’t see an announcement.

    What a joke franchise.

  129. OriginalPouzar says:

    Bank Shot: What a joke franchise.

    Why does that make is a “joke of a franchise”.

    From all accounts, Lowe had a great season in Bakersfield – he was the team’s best d-man and was a great “veteran” mentor to the kids. I anticipate the same for this coming season.

    Its a 2-year contract with a cap hit of $675K is we do run through our depth due to injury and need to call on him – other than that, it was have ZERO impact on the NHL roster.

    I anticipate if his last name was anything other than “Lowe”, nobody would have any problem with it – its a fine signing as the Condors will needs a few veterans and he is a solid AHL veteran with some (minimal) NHL experience.

  130. OriginalPouzar says:

    VOR: You are one of my favourite posters. And I mean no disrespect, as somebody who wrestled both Greco-Roman and Free Style at more than 20lbs below my body’s natural set point by getting my body fat down as low as 6% I know the incredible discipline and commitment it takes. I work with some world class body builders and see the hell they put themselves through. But what I did wasn’t healthy and what they are doing isn’t healthy.

    From the stuff you post about your training regime I can’t help think you are at some risk of short and long term problems. You self confess to:

    Lack of sleep
    Lack of rest and recovery time
    A body fat at or below 10%
    A history of addiction
    No external goals for your training
    No trainer or coach

    Does that seem like healthy behaviour to you?

    I have spent much of the last 30 years watching my older sister (the woman who raised me) slowly starve herself to death.

    -super high achiever
    -IQ off the conventional scale
    -former world class athlete
    -was a bit heavy in her late twenties
    -got down to under 10% BF and has stayed there for 40 years
    -did this by eating between 800 and 1000 calories a day and training 4 hours a day (or more) and of course no sugar or fat or salt
    -this morning she was up at 5 AM training
    -she walked 5 miles – with a walker
    -she was just released from hospital yesterday, her second stroke
    -her lungs can’t produce surfactant anymore so she can’t go out in public too much chance of infection
    -so she has a loop around her back yard
    -tomorrow she plans to add pumping iron and Yoga and Pilates back into her workout
    -whenever I send her any study suggesting being so thin might explain why she spends two to three months of every year in the hospital, can’t go out in public, and has to wear a parka even in the summer she sites some other study (did I mention she has eidetic memory) that proves she will live forever.

    Fair enough (and thank you for the kindness).

    I don’t profess that my “regime” is healthy – my lack of rest and recovery is definitely not conducive to healthy.

    I was simply responding to the point that someone at 25% plus body fat being “healthier” than someone at 8%. Yes, getting much below 8% (for men) can start to get unhealthy but getting more than 25% is also unhealthy, in particular if the fat is stored around the abdomen like it is for most men.

    I’m currently in a clean bulk phase so am eating 2500 calories/day but, even when I cut down to 7%-8%, i did it in a calculated manner – I didn’t severely restrict calories – the lowest I went was 1650/day and I didn’t restrict carbs or fat – fat was set at 20% and carbs close to 50%.

    I do appreciate the concern.

    The bigger issue with my “regime” is not the “regime” itself but its connection to my disease of addiction and that fact that it absolutely is connected – the obsession, compulsion, etc. – its my disease requiring me to hit the gym every day and to NEVER stray from my nutrition plan. Vacations stress me out as I try and fiture out the calories when I’m “off plan”. Even heading out of the house for 3-4 hours on the weekend is not preferred as it takes me away from my preferred food scheduling.

    I’m have a couple of dinners in the next few weeks and I’m already trying to figure out the food plans for those days.

    I’m not concerned about the amounts or what I eat – I know I do that in a healthy manner – I am concerned about my inability to go “off plan” and the stress and anxiety that comes with it.

  131. Bank Shot says:

    OriginalPouzar: Why does that make is a “joke of a franchise”.

    From all accounts, Lowe had a great season in Bakersfield – he was the team’s best d-man and was a great “veteran” mentor to the kids.I anticipate the same for this coming season.

    Its a 2-year contract with a cap hit of $675K is we do run through our depth due to injury and need to call on him – other than that, it was have ZERO impact on the NHL roster.

    I anticipate if his last name was anything other than “Lowe”, nobody would have any problem with it – its a fine signing as the Condors will needs a few veterans and he is a solid AHL veteran with some (minimal) NHL experience.

    He takes a roster spot away from someone that:
    A. Might have an NHL future, or
    B. Would be a better NHL injury replacement.

    You are right that I wouldn’t think twice if he had any other name but Lowe.

    When an org known for nepotism makes a move that quacks like nepotism, I’m going to assume its a duck. 🙂

  132. OriginalPouzar says:

    Bank Shot: He takes aroster spot away from someone that:
    A. Might have an NHL future, or
    B. Would be a better NHL injury replacement.

    You are right that I wouldn’t think twice if he had any other name but Lowe.

    When an org known for nepotism makes a move that quacks like nepotism, I’m going to assume its a duck.

    As per last year, he will be about 11th or 12th on the NHL depth chart – he would only be called up to the NHL if injuries really start to pile up. In that regard, he provides great cover so we don’t have to call up the likes of Jones and Lagesson before they are ready and we can allow them to continue to develop.

    The AHL team cannot be all “real prospects” and all players that are very young in to their pro careers – AHL teams need some AHL veterans as mentors and cover for the developing prospects.

    That is exactly what Keegan Lowe is – he did a great job of it last year.

    Again, if his last name was Robson, I’m sure you wouldn’t bat an eye and wouldn’t have any negative opinion of the re-signing.

  133. Bank Shot says:

    OriginalPouzar: As per last year, he will be about 11th or 12th on the NHL depth chart – he would only be called up to the NHL if injuries really start to pile up. In that regard, he provides great cover so we don’t have to call up the likes of Jones and Lagesson before they are ready and we can allow them to continue to develop.

    The AHL team cannot be all “real prospects” and all players that are very young in to their pro careers – AHL teams need some AHL veterans as mentors and cover for the developing prospects.

    That is exactly what Keegan Lowe is – he did a great job of it last year.

    Again, if his last name was Robson, I’m sure you wouldn’t bat an eye and wouldn’t have any negative opinion of the re-signing.

    What you are saying isn’t wrong, but in an ultra competitive industry like NHL hockey I think its important that teams create a culture of fairness.

    I think every time the Oilers go out and hire a Will Acton or Keegan Lowe, that hurts the perception that they are going to treat players fairly.

    It just looks bush league. Let Keegan Lowe find his own way in the hockey world.

    Sure looks like he can’t though. If he had other NHL offers I’m sure he would have taken them. This is a guy that was cast off by two other orgs in a year, and he was an RFA.

    The other orgs were saying they would rather have nothing than Lowe.

    So yeah it certainly looks like nepotism.

  134. OriginalPouzar says:

    Bank Shot: What you are saying isn’t wrong, but in an ultra competitive industry like NHL hockey I think its important that teams create a culture of fairness.

    I think every time the Oilers go out and hire a Will Acton or Keegan Lowe, that hurts the perception that they are going to treat players fairly.

    It just looks bush league. Let Keegan Lowe find his own way in the hockey world.

    Sure looks like he can’t though. If he had other NHL offers I’m sure he would have taken them. This is a guy that was cast off by two other orgs in a year, and he was an RFA.

    The other orgs were saying they would rather have nothing than Lowe.

    So yeah it certainly looks like nepotism.

    Would it be “fair” to discount the player completely because of his last name?

    There is no evidence whatsoever that he received his initial contract or this one based on his “connections”.

    In particular this 2nd contract – he earned it with his play in Bakersfield last year and we need him to replicate the performance this season.

  135. Bank Shot says:

    OriginalPouzar: Would it be “fair” to discount the player completely because of his last name?

    There is no evidence whatsoever that he received his initial contract or this one based on his “connections”.

    In particular this 2nd contract – he earned it with his play in Bakersfield last year and we need him to replicate the performance this season.

    Two NHL orgs walked away from a player that would have cost them nothing to retain. The fact that Edmonton stepped up and signed him to me is pretty good evidence that no one else wanted him.

    Maybe he earned an AHL contract, but I don’t see how playing as well as 4 rookies at age 25 gets you an NHL contract. The Oilers could have found a bonafide impact AHL defender for what they just paid Lowe Jr. Instead they got an average AHL d-man.

    I don’t discount Lowe because of his name. I would have considered him a complete longshot either way. This org signing a long shot that just happens to be the son of the vice president of remembering the 80’s is just so very Oilers.

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