Reasonable Expectations for 08-09 (Horcoff)

Thousands of years ago when baseball was an organized sport with credibility, many teams worked all summer to win something called the “pennant.” My team, the now defunct Montreal Expos, never won a “pennant” because Bud Selig is the Devil and when they finally matured as a franchise they didn’t get a real left handed bat with power until Larry Walker came along and then it was too late. The Expos used to produce very good right handed hitters, but never had a left handed bat who could play everyday (Al Oliver couldn’t throw when he came over from Texas) and they had other problems (like Doug Flynn) and never got it done.

The lesson of Larry Walker is one sports franchises in modern sports (like hockey, football and basketball) can learn from the long forgotten sport of baseball (along with “greed kills” and “people from Milwuakee can also be assfaces”). The lesson is this: sometimes a guy you sign off the street or draft 99th overall could end up being that left handed bat in the middle of your order.
—–

Shawn Horcoff is the Oilers’ left handed bat who can play in the middle of the order. On a team with wizards and warlocks, Horcoff is a guy who can play at pace while doing the actual nuts and bolts heavy lifting required to get the playing field pointed in the proper direction. Although not in Larry Walker’s class as a player, Horcoff’s unique skills (when laid against the rest of the roster) make him as valuable to this team at this time.

Faceoffs, coverage down low, making a pass or taking a pass, taking a hit to make a play, cheating for defense when Hemsky’s ad-libbing. For those reasons and more, Shawn Horcoff is the Larry Walker in the middle of a bunch of right handed bats, the rhythm section of the Rolling Stones, the Jerry Seinfeld to Kramer, George and Elaine.

Horcoff’s role this fall will be to center a line of potential All-Stars in Ales Hemsky and one of Erik Cole, Dustin Penner or Robert Nilsson. He’ll also get plenty of powerplay time, although that role may well be split with young Sam Gagner as the season enters the second half. His penalty killing time may also be cut back as candidates like Marc Pouliot and Andrew Cogliano learn on the job.

This is a player with a wide range of skills, a player who can execute the job of center on a good NHL team. This is a player good enough to be the go-to center on a club that came within a hair of winning a Stanley (Horcoff led all forwards in time-on-ice, spring 2006).

He isn’t going to be the most famous man on this team, but he’s the most valuable. He’s also going to ride Hemsky and a brilliant powerplay to a career season.

By The Numbers
  • 06-07 5×5 per 60m: 1.52
  • 07-08 5×5 per 60m: 2.59
  • 06-07 5×4 per 60m: 4.87
  • 07-08 5×4 per 60m: 4.00

My Prediction/Actual Numbers From Last Year

  • Predicted: 82gp, 20-44-64 (.780 per game)
  • Actual: 53gp, 21-29-50 (.943 per game)

My Prediction for this Season

  • 71gp, 26-44-70 (.986 per game)

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45 Responses to "Reasonable Expectations for 08-09 (Horcoff)"

  1. danny says:

    Well with Reasoner and Stoll gone, Horcoffs Qualcomp just went through the roof. The last time he faced the quality hes due to face this season, was when Stoll was injured a few seasons ago.

    I think you have it correct about him being perhaps the team MVP, but the near 1ppg clip is way higher than my expectations. Unless we replace some of his heavy lifting with a shutdown guy.

    Assuming we don’t see that happen, my guesstimate would look more like this:

    74gp 18g 35a 53pts -5

    HFboards will be screaming murder at him making $5.5M and putting up those numbers, but the -5 going PvP will be the integral stat.

    Mr Damage Control.

  2. Jonathan says:

    The other thing about Horcoff is that his shooting percentage this past season (18.3%) is almost a full five points over his career average (13.6%).

    While his new stick may deserve some of the credit, I really do not believe that to be a sustainable number.

  3. doritogrande says:

    I think a point per game is exactly the kind of production we need from Horcoff. Not the greatest #1 center, but he doesn’t have to be with Hemsky and a strong offensive #2.

  4. Mark-Ryan says:

    I’m not so worried about his quality of competition. Neither Reasoner or Stoll were good enough to handle the minutes they played and MacT threw them out in those situations anyway.

    I think Brodziak and Pouliot get murdered.

  5. RiversQ says:

    The other thing about Horcoff is that his shooting percentage this past season (18.3%) is almost a full five points over his career average (13.6%).

    While his new stick may deserve some of the credit, I really do not believe that to be a sustainable number.

    Oh, boo hoo.

    Two years ago he shot well under his average.

    I wouldn’t worry about it. Horcoff doesn’t have to shoot 18% to be a successful player.

    13.5% is a heck of a career shooting percentage and with the exception of the past two years where he has been +/- about 4%, he was within a couple of percent the rest of his career. That speaks volumes.

    Regardless, Hemsky’s the wild card here. The team goes as Hemsky goes this year. They’ve been grooming him for a while now and if he can hack it (and I think he can) then the Oilers can and will go PVP and Horcoff will be just fine.

  6. Black Dog says:

    I think Hemsky is still getting better and throw him and Cole on Horcoff’s wings and he’s a ppg player, easily. Lubo on the PP is going to help make that sucker work as well.

    I’m going to say just over a PPG and thirty goals.

  7. Jonathan says:

    Oh, boo hoo.

    Two years ago he shot well under his average.

    I wouldn’t worry about it. Horcoff doesn’t have to shoot 18% to be a successful player.

    13.5% is a heck of a career shooting percentage and with the exception of the past two years where he has been +/- about 4%, he was within a couple of percent the rest of his career. That speaks volumes.

    Completely agree. I was just pointing out that his goal production from this year probably shouldn’t be expected next year.

    Horcoff is a legitimate first-line centre in the NHL, for my money maybe even top-10, and it’s a nice feeling to have him locked up for 6 years.

  8. PDO says:

    As the leading member of the Horcoff fan club, I’ll say he plays with Hemsky and Cole all season long, and at the end of the year we’re looking at something like:

    Cole: 30-40-70 +10
    Horcoff: 25-45-70 +10
    Hemsky: 25-65-90 +10

    Hemsky’ll stir the drink offensively, but the chemistry between himself and Horcoff, along with the fact that all three have a history playing against quality will be too much.

    There’s too much smarts, speed and skill on that line.

  9. David says:

    Good grief. Is everyone on this team going to miss ten games? It’d be a bit odd, but I suppose it’s better than the alternative of Hemsky going down for forty games. *shudders*

  10. Lowetide says:

    David: Every year when I do these projections they always look wonky because it’s in 82gp notation.

    So this year I’m averaging the last three seasons. PPG of course stays the same.

  11. Islandlife says:

    I was with you right up until Larry Walker LT.

    Walker’s career season came in 1997, when he hit .366 with 49 home runs, 130 RBI, 33 stolen bases, and 409 total bases, en route to becoming the first Canadian player to win the MVP Award.
    In 1998, Walker won the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canadian athlete of the year after finishing runner-up the previous year to Formula One champion Jacques Villeneuve.
    Combined with 12 outfield assists, the season remains one of the finest all around performances in recent baseball history. Even more impressively, Walker’s breakout season came just one year after various injuries limited him to 83 games and 272 at-bats, although the NL Comeback Player of the Year award went to Darren Daulton.
    [edit]

    And that’s not all:

    Lou Marsh Trophy (1998)
    5-time All-Star (1992, 1997-99, 2001)
    7-time National League Gold Glove Award winner (1992-93, 1997-99, 2001-02)
    9-time Tip O’Neill Award winner (1987, 1990, 1992, 1994-95, 1997-98, 2001 – with Corey Koskie, 2002 – with Éric Gagné)
    National League MVP award (1997)
    4-time Top 10 MVP (1992, 5th; 1995, 7th; 1995, 10th; 1997, Won)
    3-time Silver Slugger Award (1992, 1997, 1999)
    [edit]F

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Walker

    When Horcoff gets a few more all-star selections, wins the Selke a few times and is voted league MVP, maybe.

  12. David says:

    Yeah, but it’s just as wonky trying to predict exactly how many games a player will miss. If there’s anybody that’s actually a pretty safe pick to play at least eighty games, it’s Horcoff. Seems like he plays through anything that doesn’t force him to the sidelines.

  13. Lowetide says:

    islandlife: In the original post, I said ” Although not in Larry Walker’s class as a player, Horcoff’s unique skills (when laid against the rest of the roster) make him as valuable to this team at this time.”

    What I meant was ALL of the Expos great power came from RH hitters. Here are the leading RBI men for Montreal in 1979 when they won 95 games:

    Dawson (RH) 92
    Parrish (RH) 82
    Valentine (RH) 82
    Carter (RH) 75
    Perez (RH) 75

    That’s what I meant when using Larry Walker. The Expos tried trading for left handed power (Al Oliver, etc) but never got it done.

    GREAT careers. Gary Carter, Andre Dawson, Tim Raines (a switch hitter and my favorite Expo) but no one who the manager could slot into the middle of the lineup and force the other guy to start a lefty once in awhile.

    Horcoff represents the counter to Hemsky, Gagner, Nilsson and their terrific skills, and also a counter to Cogliano, Brodziak and Pouliot with their relative inexperience with the finer details of playing center ice.

    I’m not comparing the career of Shawn Horcoff to the career of Larry Walker. I’m saying that he is as needed on this roster as “a” Larry Walker was needed by the Expos in 1979.

    That and someone aside from Stan freaking Bahnsen to pitch to Mike Schmidt.

  14. RiversQ says:

    When Horcoff gets a few more all-star selections, wins the Selke a few times and is voted league MVP, maybe.

    Maybe what?

    I’m going to be blunt.

    I think I’d rather use a divining rod and the collected works of L. Ron Hubbard to tell me whether Horcoff is a good player or not than use the damn Selke trophy.

    Oh yeah, you lost me when you started quoting 1997 stats out of fucking Denver and rattling off a list of meaningless awards like Gold Gloves and Canadian baseball awards from the early ’90′s.

    Larry Walker was a heck of a player and you captured none of it.

  15. Angela says:

    Quick Question to all the capologist out there. 5 years from now when Horc is 1 year from being a UFA if he is resigned to an extension before september 17th when he turns 35 does the extension automatically count against the cap?

  16. Islandlife says:

    Gotcha…my apologies as a long time Expo and Walker fan.

    But perhaps the Oilers need a Larry Walker playing first line centre?

    Someone here suggested he’s a top ten NHL centre and I can only think of 8 teams who would play him in that role and they all have something in common.

    That would make him bottom 10 IMO.

  17. Lowetide says:

    L. Ron Hubbard. It’s funny in any sentence.

  18. Lowetide says:

    Angela: Someone will be along shortly, my guess is “yes” and L. Ron Hubbard is also nodding yes.

    islandlife: I think Horcoff is a quality NHL player and a terrific option for the Oilers top line C. Let me ask you a question: Where would you rank Horcoff among the NW division centermen?

  19. Islandlife says:

    Well RiversQ…use whatever measuring stick you like but Walker was an exceptional baseball player but you will need a diving rod and much more than Ron L. to convince me Horcoff and Walker should be mentioned in the same breath.

  20. Gord says:

    Every time the Expos are mentioned, I flashback to the time I was in the stands in left field as a kid in Montreal watching my first game “in person”.

    A hard long hit went off the fence – Mack Jones picked up the ball right in front of us as the runner was rounding 3rd base. He threw it – one bounce in the infield to the catcher – the runner never had a chance…

  21. Islandlife says:

    LT: Tied for 3-4 with Langkow.

    1) Sedin (soon to be Sundin perhaps)
    2) Statsny
    3) Horcoff/Langkow
    4) Ditto
    5) Minnesota is in tough

    Where would you rank him in the Western Conference where the Oilers are competing for a playoff spot?

    Jokinen
    Kopitar
    Toews
    Getzlaf
    Thornton
    Datsyuk
    Arnott

    With the possible exception of Arnott, Horcoff would be behind all the above.

    What do you think?

  22. CM says:

    I think Horcoff is better than both Arnott and Sedin not Sundin however…

  23. Scott says:

    Looking at just our division, I would say the top two centers for each team are as follows (with average ppg over the last three years in brackets):

    Langkow (0.83)
    Conroy (0.58)
    Gagner (0.62 only one year)
    Horcoff (0.83)
    Sakic (1.06)
    Stastny (1.02 only two years)
    Koivu (0.58)
    Belanger (0.50)
    Sedin (0.94)
    Kesler (0.36)

    Obviously, points aren’t the only thing that matters. Context matters too. Using Desjardins, the guys playing the toughest minutes at center for their team were (with goal differential per 60 minutes in brackets):

    1. Conroy (+0.62)
    2. Langkow (+0.96)
    1. Stoll (No longer in NW)
    2. Reasoner (No longer in NW)
    3. Horcoff (+0.47)
    4. Gagner (-0.86)
    1. Sakic (-0.30)
    2. Stastny (+1.66)
    1. Koivu (+1.11)
    2. Belanger (-0.27)
    1. Kesler (+0.00)
    2. Sedin (+0.27)

    Given this information and mixing it with what I saw over the season (to me it seems that when Horcoff was healthy he would certainly have been at least the number two option for tough minutes) I think that if I were going to pick centers based on how valuable they would be overall for just next season I would order as follows:

    1. Stastny
    2. Sakic
    3. Sedin
    4. Horcoff
    5. Langkow
    6. Koivu
    7. Gagner
    8. Conroy
    9. Kesler
    10. Belanger

  24. CM says:

    Angela:

    “All Player Salary and Bonuses earned in a League Year by a Player
    who is in the second or later year of a multi-year SPC which was
    signed when the Player was age 35 or older (as of June 30 prior to
    the League Year in which the SPC is to be effective), regardless of
    whether, or where, the Player is playing, except to the extent the
    Player is playing under his SPC in the minor leagues, in which
    case only the Player Salary and Bonuses in excess of $100,000
    shall count towards the calculation of Actual Club Salary; plus” pg 190 CBA

    By reading this I would say the it wouldn’t count against the cap.

    But this would also pose the question of if a player signed a 2 way deal when over the age of 35 which salary would count against the cap?

  25. Jonathan says:


    Jokinen
    Kopitar
    Toews
    Getzlaf
    Thornton
    Datsyuk
    Arnott

    With the possible exception of Arnott, Horcoff would be behind all the above.

    What do you think?

    Horcoff is well clear of Jokinen, as well as Toews and Kopitar at this stage in their careers.

  26. Jonathan says:

    Nevermind about Toews, who is a very special player, especially given his age.

  27. PDO says:

    Saying that Kopitar helps his team win more than Shawn Horcoff is borderline asinine.

  28. RiversQ says:

    That would make him bottom 10 IMO.

    Something tells me this isn’t what you wanted to say. The bottom ten centres in the league don’t even have NHL jobs for half the year.

    As for the WC and NW lists, he’s certainly a better player than Stastny right now especially at ES where the majority of the game is played.

    I’d take him over Jokinen any day of the week. (Apologies to Jonathan but I was on this during the lockout – Horc has pretty much matched or beaten Jokinen everywhere every year since they’ve been in the NHL and he actually played in a decent division. Jokinen is all smoke, mirrors and a shit-tonne of minutes)

    I’d disregard the rest of the kids on the list frankly. All good players already that will certainly be serious difference makers in a couple of years, but I’d take Horcoff in matchups against Toews, Kopitar and Getzlaf right now and probably next year too.

    Meanwhile we’ve already seen him outplay Datsyuk and Thornton head-to-head in playoff series as well, so what more is there to prove?

    I wouldn’t say Horcoff is top-ten overall because the top-ten guys tend to run the PP as well as smoke at ES, but he’s certainly in the top 15 and there aren’t too many skaters at 5V5 that you’d rather have IMO.

  29. Colby Cosh says:

    Am I wrong in wanting, like, one more half-season of this stuff from Stastny before we put him at the top of the heap?

  30. Colby Cosh says:

    Meanwhile we’ve already seen him outplay Datsyuk and Thornton head-to-head in playoff series as well, so what more is there to prove?

    In fairness, a good answer would be “Let’s see him outplay a healthy Datsyuk and, if such a thing could exist, a motivated Thornton.”

  31. David says:

    Perhaps the best way to think of Horcoff is a top-end center at even strength and a good number two guy on the powerplay who brings a lot of other skills and intangibles that make him more valuable than guys who are better offensively, but don’t flat-out outclass him (so Datsyuk would be ahead, but not necessarily Stasny).

    It makes him a rather unusual player, which might be why a lot of Oilers fan still don’t “get” Horcoff.

  32. Gandalf The Red says:

    Hey Lowetide, great blog, I’ve been reading it for awhile now. Huge Tom Gilbert fan (I contribute to a Wisconsin Badger Hockey blog), but the Oilers are really growing on me in general. I’ve been following the whole off season through your blog.

    I think the people of Milwaukee dislike Bud Selig as much as you do. He sells the Brewers, now they finally win because they don’t have a pussy for an owner. While I was never an Expos fan, I do remember the season you speak of, and how convienent for baseball to strike then when some of the non “traditional” teams were doing so well.

  33. Coach pb9617 says:

    I think it’s disgusting that we have to waste so much time and thought in defending a beauty player like Horcoff. The guy has been nothing but the nuts for the last three years and he’s improved each of those years.

    *sigh* I hate stupid hockey fans.

  34. Dennis says:

    The Expos were never able to draft/develop/find hitting like they could with pitching and it was just another bit of bad luck that they year it was all coming together was also the year the labour war was in full bloom.

    I think the Horcoff/Walker thing works on the level that Larry came out of basically nowhere to be a find player Before he went altitudinal and at Horc’s draft slot, no one expected him to become an outscorer. On pure talent along, though, it doesn’t work but I don’t think that’s what LT meant, either.

  35. Scott says:

    “The guy has been nothing but the nuts for the last three years and he’s improved each of those years.”

    Look, I like Shawn Horcoff a lot, but this just isn’t so. 2006-07 was bad. Really bad. If your go-to center scores fifty-one points over the season, that’s not very good. If he’s -1.26 goals per 60 at 5v5, that’s really bad. He didn’t bring the offence. He didn’t bring the defence. He had a bad year. There is no reason to pretend the guy has been gangbusters for three straight seasons. And to say that 2006-07 was an improvement on 2005-06 is, to be frank, stupid.

  36. Doogie2K says:

    So this year I’m averaging the last three seasons. PPG of course stays the same.

    That doesn’t really strike me as being a better metric. I mean, in the four years prior to last, he missed exactly nine games. Total. I’m more inclined to bet on Hemsky playing only 70 games than Horcoff, based on their respective histories.

    I think I’d rather use a divining rod and the collected works of L. Ron Hubbard to tell me whether Horcoff is a good player or not than use the damn Selke trophy.

    Brilliant. I mean, it’s not like the Selke winner is always bad, so much as it’s all over the map. I mean, Rod Brind’Amour in 2007? Really? Even Rod knew the correct answer was “Samuel Pahlsson, Anaheim Ducks.”

    Well RiversQ…use whatever measuring stick you like but Walker was an exceptional baseball player but you will need a diving rod and much more than Ron L. to convince me Horcoff and Walker should be mentioned in the same breath.

    You’re being kind of obtuse. Lowetide said it in the context that both players are the sort of unique ingredient that their respective teams need/needed, and came from somewhere totally unexpected. He explicitly stated (twice now) that they were not the same calibre of player in their respective games; that fact is irrelevant to the overall point.

    And I’m not even going to step into the “Is Horcoff a [insert adjective here] #1 centre?” debate, because not only is it asinine to still be having it at this point, but Riv and Jonathan pretty much have it under control. Bottom line: right now, he’s one of the most well-rounded centres in the game, and while he doesn’t blow your pants off at any one aspect, he’s above average in nearly all of them.

  37. gary b says:

    On a team with wizards and warlocks, Horcoff is a guy who can play at pace while doing the actual nuts and bolts heavy lifting required to get the playing field pointed in the proper direction.

    i’d say Horc is half human/half warlock with a +22 Staff of (ES) Power and a Cloak of Reliability.

  38. Coach pb9617 says:

    And to say that 2006-07 was an improvement on 2005-06 is, to be frank, stupid.

    RIiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight. What’s an ark?

    We should scrutinize a season in which the #1 C lost his #1 RW, his #1 LW and his #2 C.

    What’s a cubit?

    Stupid is thinking in a vacuum. Welcome to the world of Hoover.

  39. Scott says:

    So would you say that Shawn Horcoff improved in 2006-07? Do you what his results were until Jan. 18 before any of those players were lost? He certainly wasn’t cracking the top 50 in league scoring.

    Perhaps I’m being obtuse but I don’t follow what you’re getting at with your reference to arks or cubits.

    I’m not trying to say that Horcoff is a bad player, but I think sometimes people build him up past what his results have shown.

  40. Lowetide says:

    Scott: Not to get into a big argument about this, but generally speaking when a player with an established level of ability (as in Horcoff’s case) takes a dive it can be accounted for by the following:

    1. Injury to player
    2. New role on team
    3. New coach
    4. New team

    In Horcoff’s case it was injury. As for people being defensive in regard to Horcoff, after many years of listening to every ridiculous argument in the book I’ve given up arguing about it.

    You either get Horcoff or you don’t, and if you don’t it is more a reflection of you than it is of Horcoff.

    And that, my friend, is that.

  41. Doogie2K says:

    Well, LT, in 06-07, I don’t think any of those things are really relevant to Horcoff’s performance. He had a shitty year, and he’s the first to admit it.

    No one here will, nor should, brook any judgment of his 07-08 season, but 06-07 is, I think, fair game.

  42. Scott says:

    Lowetide and Coach, I assume the injury and departed are Hemsky, Stoll and Smyth.

    I think the first serious injury along these lines was Smyth’s in the game against L.A. So let’s look at Horcoff’s performance in the first 35 games with that one against L.A. being the last one included:

    In 35 games Horcoff scored 4 goals and 15 assists for 19 points. At 5v5 taking out any goals that involved 6v5 toward the end of the game it was 19 GF and 24 GA, which over 82 games would leave us with:

    -11.7 at 5v5 and boxcar numbers of about 10-35-45.

    I don’t see the argument that injuries submarined his 2006-07. I think the guy (who I still think is a very good player) had a crappy season. To say this was an improvement over his 2005-06 seems blatantly false to me, especially since when the season is taken as a whole it doesn’t really improve.

    I see comments like “the guy has been nothing but the nuts for the last three years and he’s improved each of those years” as defending someone with falsehoods when the truth would suffice. The guy is a good player but he hasn’t improved every year. In his three years as the top center on the club he’s had two good years with one bad one. I don’t think that this is a ridiculous argument and I don’t think it helps your Hor-cause to put blinders on and not (honestly) discuss the guy’s merits.

  43. RiversQ says:

    I don’t think that this is a ridiculous argument and I don’t think it helps your Hor-cause to put blinders on and not (honestly) discuss the guy’s merits.

    Agreed. It’s not a ridiculous argument.

    It does however plunge headlong into the whole argument about shooting percentage. If Horcoff shot his career average in 06/07, everything you posted looks quite a bit better. IIRC, it would have meant about 7-8 goals with the same number of shots and that does wonders with GF/GA, counting numbers and scoring rates.

    So the question is, was Horc’s SH% low because there’s something systematically wrong with his game, because he had a bad year or because he’s unlucky?

    I think A is nuts, B is plausible and C is most likely. What do you think Scott?

  44. Scott says:

    I agree that Horcoff was unlucky as far as shooting percentage, although I think it’s actually a difference of about six goals and I agree that those six goals would make a difference.

    But, Horcoff’s most common linemate through the first part of the season was Ryan Smyth and he shot at 19.3% that season with the Oilers, scoring 31 goals. If he shoots his career average of 11.9% then he only scores 19 goals. The other forwards he played quite a bit with were Lupul and Hemsky. Lupul was shortchanged about one goal and so was Hemsky, so they don’t really affect much.

    For his career, Smyth scores 42% of his goals on the PP. His 2006-07 was 45% so that seems in the range. His extra looks to have been distributed equally.

    With all that said, yeah, option A is nuts.

    Option C to me looks plausible, but doesn’t explain why his assists are way down. I also don’t think it explains his EV+/- given Smyth’s lucky season would more than balance off Horcoff’s unlucky season. We’re talking an extra 12 goals over 53 games for Smyth and a lack of 6 over 80 games for Horcoff.

    Given everything we know, I think option C is the best. The dude had a bad year whether he scored 16 goals or 22.

  45. RiversQ says:

    Given everything we know, I think option C is the best. The dude had a bad year whether he scored 16 goals or 22.

    Yeah I dunno I have a few other things to add.

    1) I think LT was commenting on Horcoff’s injury. The guy did play with a crushed finger for at least ten games that year didn’t he?

    2) I tend to forget how fucking shocking Lupul was at ES that year. I have his ES breakdown by linemates somewhere and it’s not pretty for Horc and Smyth when they were saddled with him. I’ll try to dig it up.

    3) The flipside of that was Smyth’s year. As much as Smyth certainly had some luck that year he was also really driving the zone time from the offensive end as I recall. Strong play plus some lucky SH% equals what was pretty much a career year if you were to pro-rate it. I would say Horc had plenty of quality chances that year as a result.

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