Nostradamus

This is an artist’s rendering of Michel de Nostredame who is known in the English world as Nostradamus. Although he did more for the public good as a doctor (he helped many survive the Plague after losing his own family to the disease), he is legend for an inability to predict the future.

The distant future. Most academic sources will tell you he was a quack and much of his “visionary” ability can be credited to eager amateurs interpreting his writings and then seeking out real time events to match (or, bass ackwards as they say).

Nostradamus became famous in our lifetime when certain television networks found a dark room, a flashlight and people like Robert Stack to sell the fantasy. One would guess that anyone living in his lifetime could have made predictions that were as accurate using only opium, a straw and gout.

If he were alive today, I think Nostradamus might have made a fine living as a hockey rumormonger. He could say things like “Mats Sundin will definitely decide by August 1″ and then follow that up with “Mats Sundin was going to decide by August 1 but a late entry by another team has clouded the issue.” All the while probably not knowing Mats Sundin if he rang his doorbell and bit him in the ass.

It’s all kind of silly. Not mentioning any names, mind you.

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20 Responses to "Nostradamus"

  1. Jonathan says:

    But did Nostradamus had a hockey blog ranked in the top ten in USA Hockey Magazine?

  2. Scott says:

    If we all avoid a certain hockey website, will a certain un-named person just go away already?

  3. Fake Craig McTavish says:

    Augury is a tough game.

  4. Coach pb9617 says:

    If we all avoid a certain hockey website, will a certain un-named person just go away already?

    That’s how I feel about the boards at HF.

  5. James Mirtle says:

    If we all avoid a certain hockey website, will a certain un-named person just go away already?

    I doubt it.

  6. Jesse says:

    Can we all please stop beating around the buzz…err…bush.

  7. Vic Ferrari says:

    I remember reading a thing on Mirtle about the popularity of that site. I don’t remember the numbers, but I do remember that the significant majority of his traffic came from Canada.

    Contrast that with my shift chart and H2H icetime site, which gets far fewer hits (23 to 25 thousand per month during the season), but they are overwhelmingly American visitors.

    Where did we go wrong in this country LT? I think that all the goalies doing colour on TV are part of it, but it’s more than that. We love the hockey magic, God bless us. And if an American and a Canadian hockey fan are arguing about a player, or what happened in a hockey game … I automatically assume that the American is right.

  8. Lowetide says:

    I think Americans find it easier to break down the game with math. Zones and ERA and such, they’re familiar with the strength of an opposite end faceoff and feel a need to quantify it.

    In short, they have more leisure time plus there is more of them.
    :-)

  9. Ribs says:

    It sounds like most Americans have to seek out hockey if they want to follow it. Random people on the street who have never played hockey in their lives know who guys like “Raffi Torres” are in Canadian cities.

    I wonder what age group follows the buzz-tripe?

  10. Vic Ferrari says:

    I dunno LT, this unique Oiler blogging community aside, there isn’t really a fondness for abandoning the simple pigeon-holing.

    I think that someone who grew up in Canada accepts the fact that Moreau was a ’20 goal scoring checker’ in 03/04 because that’s what Terry Jones, Kelly Hrudey, etc kept telling them.

    A sharp fan from a new market, who hasn’t really been immersed in the culture, he has a really good chance of just keeping it simple, noticing the guys who were really taking on the tough gig against Modano. No preconceptions. No rocket science. No nonsense.

    I heard Stoll pretty much define tough minutes, using the exact term, when talking about Pronger. The only reference in the Journal the next day was something along the lines of “Stoll, for one, will miss Pronger’s toughness”. Jebus.

    And as I’m on this vein, I remember churning out some rough stats that showed Lydman to likely be playing hard minutes in Cowtown in 02/03. Flames fans linked to it and universally bashed the notion (except for some guy named ‘Loooooob’). Next year the same thing.

    Then in 06/07 I watch a game on CI, from Buffalo, and the Sabres announcers are on the ice before the game, a guy who looks like Denis Potvin (but isn’t) he’s screaming that the return of Lydman is key, because even though he’ll probably be eased back into the lineup over the next few games, they’ll need him to be on his game for the playoffs, because he’ll be expected to take the hard match with the other team’s best players.

    How hard is that? Why can’t are media manage it. Or when they occasionally do, how in hell do they manage to get it wrong so often? It isn’t hard, and context matters a bunch.

  11. Coach pb9617 says:

    I think Americans find it easier to break down the game with math. Zones and ERA and such, they’re familiar with the strength of an opposite end faceoff and feel a need to quantify it.

    Beisbal been berry berry good to bringing stats into the forefront.

    Curling just doesn’t have the same depth of analysis :)

  12. DMFB says:

    Beisbal been berry berry good to bringing stats into the forefront.

    True, but there are still plenty of people down there, especially ones with media jobs, who stick to the old, bad stats.

    I think it might be, as Vic suggests, exposure: as a Canadian, you just get conventional hockey wisdom drilled into you from a young age, I assume in a very similar way to how Americans get baseball knowledge ingrained. It’s harder to look past the convention when you hear it so often.

  13. Oiler Mag says:

    The Philly Fried Phoney always reminds me of the Warlock in Live Free or Die Hard. An overweight geek with his own power-trip agenda. Creaming off a fortune by mis-using the internet.

  14. Dennis says:

    LT: I actually read a McLean’s survey that said Canadians work less than the Amerks so there goes that “more leisure time” excuse:)

    I’m not sure if I agree with Vic that the Amerk would be right in the aforementioned agreement but I will say that I agree with the notion that a new fan will be more open to newer ideas. It took me about two straight seasons of blabbering to clue my buddies in to how coaches run their benches and how much of an impact it makes and the point is all these fellows had watched hockey for years and had been drilled with “counting stats the only good.”

    The other thing is that anyone who’s in their early 20′s now will be getting a much broader education then folks would’ve 10 years ago. You take the new shining star of the Sphere, Jon. This guy’s head and eyes above where we were at his age or even 10 years ago because he’s grown up with this stuff.

    There are millions of Can fans in their 40′s — hell, even 30′s — who have already been “programmed” about how they should watch hockey games and what are the most important points of a game summary.

  15. Vic Ferrari says:

    Yeah Dennis, Jon and a bunch of other young guys on this part of the net are the exception though. I don’t think that the Oilogosphere is changing people’s views very much (though we pretty clearly do something to shape each other’s opinions), mostly I just think that it’s a place for that type of hockey fan to hang out.

    And I think that a lot of younger fans are completely off the wall, I’m sure it must be video games at fault, because they say stuff just comes right out of the blue.

    Another thing is that a lot of people in Canada are into hockey pools, so moreso and moreso they just care about the stats that win them the hockey pool, and not the things on the ice that the player is doing to help their team win hockey games.

  16. therealdeal says:

    I wish I could just punch Nostradamus in the face sometimes. Especially when he has Sundin related prophecies.

  17. Doogie2K says:

    I wish I could just punch Nostradamus in the face sometimes. Especially when he has Sundin related prophecies.

    And here I thought when he was talking about “Mats in Montreal” he meant Naslund. Bastard.

  18. Jonathan says:

    Jon and a bunch of other young guys on this part of the net are the exception though. I don’t think that the Oilogosphere is changing people’s views very much (though we pretty clearly do something to shape each other’s opinions), mostly I just think that it’s a place for that type of hockey fan to hang out.

    Well, speaking for myself, up to about two years ago I hadn’t done much thinking beyond goals/assists/points/plus-minus. The blogosphere, particularly by presenting the idea of adding context to numbers (quality of linemates/competition, icetime recieved, which zone they take faceoffs in, etc.) has had a huge effect on how I view the game and how I value players.

    I’ve got a huge knowledge debt to a bunch of you guys.

  19. Oilman says:

    http://peklundthephoneyhockeyblogger.blogspot.com/

    A nice spoof and as much or more work went into the writing I’m sure

  20. Kent W. says:

    This corner of the blogosphere has been tremendously influential in my own scribblings and the way I view the game.

    I often wonder why there is such a vast difference between Oilers/Flames blogger representation. In terms of sheer volume, ability, etc.

    We may be adversaries, but given all the similarities, one would the thing the differences between the two online camps wouldn’t be so stark.

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