Nash Rambler Hits the Road

Riley Nash gets into action tonight as Cornell plays against Princeton (NJ) at Hobey Baker Rink. The Big Red will play Quinnipiac on Saturday (both are road games) to get the season underway.

The choice of Cornell is a curious one for such a quality player, as Nash’s season starts way later than every other prospect in the Oilers system and most certainly affects developmental timeline. Also, the level of competition is below what a player of Nash’s quality would find had he attended Michigan or North Dakota.

Still, Cornell as a university is very impressive. The main campus is in Ithica, New York and they have two medical campuses in New York and Qatar.

Nash is listed this season by Cornell as being 6-1, 179. His bio reminds us that he was named both the ECAC and Ivy League rookie of the year for 07-08. He went 36gp, 12-20-32 and is taking Applied Economics and Management.

I have Riley Nash ranked as the number one prospect in the system, and you can read more about him by clicking “Nash” at the bottom of this post.

written by

The author didn‘t add any Information to his profile yet.
Related Posts

34 Responses to "Nash Rambler Hits the Road"

  1. Paper Designer says:

    Any idea whether or not he stays the full four years? I would think his playing career will require a step up in competition after this year.

  2. Quain says:

    Thank God he’s playing again. It’s only a few more years before we can call him up to play first line center and finally put Horcoff on the third line where he belongs!!!

  3. Lord Bob says:

    Can we start a “Get Nash The Hell Out Of Cornell” movement or something? I’ve said it before and will say it again: this is not the place for a blue-chip prospect. I’d rather see him in the CHL or ECHL than at Cornell again.

  4. Coach pb9617 says:

    Maybe the kid is concerned about education as well as Hockey. If that’s the case, he should stay at Cornell.

  5. Lowetide says:

    Ken Dryden went to Cornell. I hope Nash is more interesting.

  6. Boondock says:

    Put me down for leaving Nash in Cornell over the CHL. Hopefully Oil brass think he’s ready to turn pro next year, but if not, he’s best off where he is.

    Skill development happens in practice, where you spend way more time actually handling a puck. I don’t know much about Cornell specifically, but based on some NCAA guys I’ve talked to, most programs take practice very seriously. (A friend who went to Maine told me he was on a couple occasions called into the coaches office, where the coach had the entire practice recorded with an isolated camera on him the whole time and went over where he needed to work harder, etc.)

    Weight training is also much easier when you’re not spending 2 weeks at a time bussing all over the prairies.

    Here’s hoping for a WJC appearance this Christmas for Nash and if he’s ready, Springfield next fall.

  7. Matt says:

    Ken Dryden went to Cornell.

    So did Nieuwendyk, and if there has ever been a college kid who was more “pro-ready” when he hit the NHL, I can’t think of him.

  8. Black Dog says:

    Uh Matt? Brad Winchester? I mean, Hello!?

  9. Matt says:

    Apart from Winchester (naturally), I’d take arguments about Kariya, but I think that’s it.

  10. spOILer says:

    Ny sister’s boy is heading to Merrimack this weekend to be interviewed, toured, etc for a hockey scholarship.

    While Merrimack perrenially toils at the bottom of Hockey East, it’s a far better league than the Ivy.

    As a 2nd yr 18 yo, he’s hovering around 10-15th in scoring in the AJHL (last I checked).

    I raise this because I can’t see Nash developing in competition against teams that are filled with reasonably good Tier 2 Jr. players.

    If he doesn’t dominate this year, or his play falls off, like Sir Bob, I’d like to see him sprung free from the Ivy Tower.

  11. Asiaoil says:

    When you look at the odds of having an NHL career at all (low) then factor in how long that career is likely to last (short) this calculus would lead a smart kid with smart parent to certain decisions.

    Anyone calling for Riley Nash to dump an Ivy League education to ride buses for peanuts in the CHL or fight goons in the ECHL is clearly thinking more about what they want (to watch Nash) more than what’s best for Riley Nash the person and his future. Riley Nash and his parents are clearly smart enough to see this given their decisions to date.

    If I were him I would stay at Cornell for one more year given the logjam of young guys in the Oiler’s system right now. Leaving after his junior year makes sense in that he could potentially make the jump straight to the NHL since he will be older, stronger, smarter – and he wouldn’t have much left to complete for his degree should hockey not work out. Pretty much the Chorney model.

  12. heed says:

    only in the hockey world would someone complain about a kid choosing cornell.

  13. Sean says:

    Ok so who has a better chance of making the WJC team. Nash or Eberle? I’d think Eberle based on his start but Nash is a year older.

  14. Asiaoil says:

    So true heed….but hey….Canadians enjoy exploiting children and young men for their amusement as long as it’s under the umbrella of the “national pastime”.

  15. CrazyCoach says:

    I think Hockey Canada and the NHL would like to see Nash stay in Cornell anyway. Although they could never do it, the NHL would probably like to go back to the 20 year old draft age.

    I know that Hockey Canada’s recent change in only allowing four 16 year olds on a major junior team (affiliates included) and no 15 year olds (no more Glen Goodall’s), sprouted from pressure from the NHL. What they are finding through research is that too many kids are being injured. There is also a ton of research being done on the effect late bloomers have in terms of development. What they are finding is that 18-19 is too young for the pros. Yes there are exceptions to that rule.

    If any of you have ever coached you know that the kid who is untouchable in Atom and Pee Wee sometimes may not even make the rep team in Bantam. Look at John Tavares. No one could tell me that spending an additional year in Midget would have held him back, but breaking into the OHL at 15 seems to be catching up to him now.

    Leave Nash at Cornell.

  16. Lowetide says:

    Asia: Not all Canadians. That’s unfair.

  17. CrazyCoach says:

    Yes LT that’s true.

    I strongly believe in Hockey Canada’s mission statement.

    “To lead, develop, and promote positive hockey experiences”

  18. Jonathan says:

    When you look at the odds of having an NHL career at all (low) then factor in how long that career is likely to last (short) this calculus would lead a smart kid with smart parent to certain decisions.

    Yes, yes, and yes. I couldn’t agree more, and despite the “education clause” in CHL contracts, if I were a up-and-coming prospect, there’s no chance at all that I wouldn’t go the NCAA route.

    Cornell may not be the best place for his hockey career, but as a life choice it’s very difficult to argue.

  19. Asiaoil says:

    Sure not all LT – but the politically correct tone that mainstream Canadian society adopts on many many issues vaporizes when confronted by examples of base exploitation in the CHL. Sixteen year old kids should be at home with their families working on their high school diplomas – not busing around the country working full-time for peanuts all for the amusement of the masses. Although this model may serve to speed up the hockey development of a small minority – the vast majority who will never play a single game of pro hockey are simply exploited.

  20. doritogrande says:

    Three years in the Ivy League didn’t seem to hamper Erik Cole, graduate of Clarkson U.

    As long as Nash’s bench-pressing Taylor Chorney by the end of next year, I’m fine with keeping him there until the prospect pipeline thins out.

    A WJC appearance should be what he (and Eberle for that matter) should be striving for this year. I remember a report after the Summer eval camp where Mcguire was splooging all over about the kid’s pest-like capabilities. If we can get a (clean)Downie/Burrows type out of him, complete bonus.

  21. CrazyCoach says:

    Exploitation is a strong word. I know Hockey Canada is concerned about it, hence the limit on 16 year olds in junior. The new system is designed to keep kids at home as long as possible. Unfortunately, not every province has that idea. I know here in BC we have strict rules in regards to residency that keeps kids at home, but in ALberta the residency rules are not as strict.

    On the other hand, it was Ken Linsmen who sued the NHL over the 20 year old draft age, claiming that as an 18 year old he was considered the age of majority, and thus free to do anything he wanted, except earn a living playing hockey.

  22. Marc says:

    For the record, Clarkson isn’t Ivy League but it is in the ECAC. The Ivy League is Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Dartmouth, Brown, Cornell, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania. The last two don’t have hockey teams, and the other six compete in the larger ECAC.

    All ECAC schools have strict academic requirements and play fewer games so they don’t interfere too much with the players’ studies. One advantage they do have though, is that ECAC hockey players are often 19 or 20 when they enroll, so they are playing against men, not boys as they would in the CHL. The training facilities are also superb.

    Lee Stempniak is a Dartmouth guy and Chris Higgins went to Yale I think. Hugh Jessiman was a top ten draft pick out of Dartmouth, though his career floundered when he dropped out and went to the AHL. One of Colorado’s rookies this year went to Dartmouth and I think there’s a guy in Florida’s system too, so the Ivy League is not a bar to a pro hockey career.

    I went to Dartmouth (not as a hockey player) and loved it. I got a great education and had an absolute blast. I can’t begrudge anyone for making the same choice I did, especially when at worst, it just slows down their development. They can still make it to the NHL if they have the talent and put the work in, as guys like Stempniak and Higgins have demonstrated.

  23. Asiaoil says:

    Strong words are needed to describe a situation where you have children (15-17 years old) working full-time for essentially no pay. In the 3rd world that’s call child exploitation and Canadian think it’s unacceptable. Seems a different standard is applied when the national sport is up for discussion though.

    When people turn 18 they are adults and can do as they please, whenever they please, with whoever they please – as long as they follow the laws of the land.

  24. Lowetide says:

    As a parent I can tell you this trial that is going on currently makes me ill. I have a boy who is a young teen and can tell you that if these stories are true (and there’s no reason to think that they are false) then something is damn wrong here.

    Mike Danton is guilty, but he’s not alone. And neither is the pig on trial.

  25. Lowetide says:

    Cornell won their game 1-0. Nothing to report on the Nash front. Princeton outshot them 43-19 and the boxscore is already up on USCHO.

  26. Lord Bob says:

    Well, if Nash was concerned about his education, he could have gone to play Canadian junior, improved his chances at a pro career, and with his skill level played so long and racked up so many scholarships that if he washed out he could go to the Canadian school of his choice and get a proper degree without having to worry about hockey. Plus, he’d make some carrying-around money in his playing days.

    The “go south for education” red herring is just that, unless you think that American universities are so vastly superior to Canadian ones that it’s worth the loss of academic focus that comes from playing elite prospect-level hockey.

    Not that I’m denying that the NCAA can’t produce good hockey players. Mark Messier went straight from the AJHL to the major leagues, but that doesn’t mean I’d tell my kid “forget the WHL, go to the AJHL because of Mark Messier”. :P

  27. Asiaoil says:

    Yeah I never brought up the dark side of this either – just the economics. But really – is there any justification for not having 15-17 year olds living at home and playing high level high school hockey other than out-dated traditions and the greed of junior hockey operators who want to continue paying their employees nothing for their labor?

    Canada needs to join the 20th century and put the welfare of the vast majority of under-aged kids playing junior hockey above anything else – and that means they stay at home and play high school hockey just like in every other sport.

    Once they finish high school they can turn pro like any other adult and the CHL should be the major development league for the NHL which means actually paying its employees real salaries like any other business.

  28. Lord Bob says:

    But really – is there any justification for not having 15-17 year olds living at home and playing high level high school hockey other than out-dated traditions and the greed of junior hockey operators who want to continue paying their employees nothing for their labor?

    Canada needs to join the 20th century and put the welfare of the vast majority of under-aged kids playing junior hockey above anything else – and that means they stay at home and play high school hockey just like in every other sport.

    Junior players get paid – paid more than just about anybody at that age is, actually. High school players don’t. Staying home is a good argument, “they get paid nothing!” isn’t.

  29. Boondock says:

    Well, if Nash was concerned about his education, he could have gone to play Canadian junior, improved his chances at a pro career, and with his skill level played so long and racked up so many scholarships that if he washed out he could go to the Canadian school of his choice and get a proper degree without having to worry about hockey.

    Unfortunately, the little known fact about CHL scholarships is that if you sign a pro contract after playing in the CHL, you forfeit your scholarship dollars.

    You can’t play in the CHL, go try your luck in the minors and then have your scholarship to fall back on.

  30. Asiaoil says:

    Well if working full-time for a couple hundred bucks a month seems like a good deal to you – I’ll gladly offer that to you right now – interested? Also your knowledge of US schools is pretty much non-existent. Cornell is a wonderful institution – one of the best in the world in many areas – and that had nothing to do with the relative quality of Canadian universities which are universally held in high regard. The US schools give full scholarship rides – Canadian schools don’t – that’s the difference.

  31. CrazyCoach says:

    For arguments sake, junior hockey players are not the only ones who undergo intense workloads for little or no pay. I have worked for years in the puclic school system and many students between the ages of 15-17 are under intense pressure from parents or themselves in the pursuit of academic excellence.

    Why do they do it? The lure of entrance scholarships and bursaries that could essentially give one a university degree for free. And in some cases, parents send their kids away to elite prep schools where they face incredible pressure to perform. If the schools put out great students, they can charge higher tuition. Someone gets rich.

    Is that the same?

  32. Jonathan says:

    Cornell is a wonderful institution – one of the best in the world in many areas…

    Andy: The capital of Maine is Montpelier, Vermont, which is near Ithaca, New York, where I went to Cornell.

    Dwight: Okay, also, moratorium on Cornell talk. Don’t wanna hear about it. Forget your personal history, and learn the history of this company.

    Andy: Should not be a problem. I minored in history in the Ivy League school which I attended.

    Dwight: You’re not off to a very good start, Bernard.

    Andy: I agree. But in another way, I am off to a very good start, wouldn’t you say?

    Note – I agree, but now have Cornell and Ed Helms permanently linked in my mind.

  33. Dennis says:

    JW: Same here:) The Office is on fire this season and the Jim/Dwight/Micheal phone bit from this week’s past episode was, dare I say, off the hook;)

    Anyway, I agree that Nash made the right decision to put school first but if I’m the Oilers and I spent a draft pick on him, I’m trying to do whatever I can to get value out of him.

  34. Jonathan says:

    Dennis: Yeah, it was a little slow to start off with, but it's picked up a ton since the second episode.

    They've done a good job adding tension to Jim & Pam's relationship, but eventually that'll clear up and than I'll be wondering about the show's sustain ;)

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

© Copyright - Lowetide.ca