VALUE CONTRACTS

One of the key (and undervalued, of course) elements of the 05-06 team were the large number of value contracts. It’s a huge item in a cap world and the Oilers haven’t had a bunch in recent years.

The 05-06 season featured a lot of these young men, 6 by my count which made up over 30% of the every night lineup for the Oilers. Beyond Eberle and the first overalls, the candidates for 12-13 are as follows:

  1. D Jeff Petry: $1.75M for a guy who is going to clear 22 minutes a night based on what the depth chart looks like currently. Smart, capable player with the puck and improving defensively. Lanky kid, he can recover nicely from being out of position in a hurry. Can he hit 30 points? I think so, 25 points last season in 73 games without a major PP push.
  2. L Teemu Hartikainen: $875,000 and he might get a push all the way up the depth chart. A lot of this is luck and timing–Oilers brass were staring at those tall drinks in LA all spring and Harski fits the height requirement and brings some other things too. Can he score 15-2o goals? I think he can if the young Finn gets to play extended periods with the skilled kids at forward this season.
  3. L Ryan Smyth: $2,250,000 is a very good contract for this veteran. Coach Krueger is unlikely to wear him out in the first months of this season and Smyth can help in all three disciplines.
  4. R Magnus Paajarvi: $1,525,000 and somewhat forgotten because of the struggles in 11-12, Paajarvi has a nice range of skills and there will be an opportunity this season. We know he can score 15 goals in an NHL season, but if he can develop as a 2-way player (and the underlying numbers are a pleasant surprise) then this player will be a big boost to the Oilers.
  5. D Taylor Fedun: $900,000 and all but forgotten, but if he can play at the same level as one year ago the Oilers might have a very interesting decision to make in the 5-7 rotation. Based on his progress I wouldn’t bet against him.

The Oilers have some other “bubbling under” talents like Chris VandeVelde, Tyler Pitlick, Phil Cornet, Martin Marincin, Olivier Roy and Tyler Bunz, but that group of five listed above have a really nice chance to deliver well past their paycheques.

 

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36 Responses to "VALUE CONTRACTS"

  1. speeds says:

    I think Fedun would have to be incredible to make the team out of camp. Coming off that injury I’d be surprised if he didn’t play in the AHL for a bit, unless he looks absolutely incredible at camp.

    That said, if he looked really good at camp, went down to the AHL for 20-30 games and looked great there, he could be the callup and, if he looked great at the NHL level, maybe then it would be decision time?

    Also, not sure how you make a value contract list and leave Eberle off – I guess you’re just assuming him and the #1′s are givens?

  2. Lowetide says:

    speeds: Yeah. “Surprise” value. Eberle delivered so much last year I don’t really know how to approach his 12-13. I do my RE stuff in the next week or so and right now I’ve got him coming back to the pack quite a bit. Don’t know if it’s fair, but can’t assume he’ll deliver at last year’s level.

  3. TheOtherJohn says:

    Jesus LT

    Not sure MPS will count as value contract at $1.5 m. Particularly if he is a nonscoring 3LW. And this will surprise everyone but Fedun would have played the great bulk of season in AHL last year w/o injury. May have been second or third D called up last year from farm but expect he would have dressed and played some playoff games. Expect he might have a solid NHL career but after hellacious injury I expect he will play 60 – 70 games in OKC? Agreed though on Smytty and Petry. Only issue is why not sign Petry for 3-4 years?

  4. cdean says:

    Those seem like great value contracts that you mentioned. The only thing is what is not mentioned. On the bottom of the roster we have too many questions; Petrell, Belanger, Eager, Jones, Peckham, Sutton.

    It is great that we have those value contracts that you mention but we also might have some dead weight pulling is down. You seem to like to compare to the ’06 cup run, think about if they had some else besides Harvey in the line up how much, their 4th line would have been that much better. We need to separate the wheat from the chaff.

  5. Lowetide says:

    CDean: Suffice to say that if the Oilers are serious about improving this season that 4th line is going to have a different look.

  6. PaperDesigner says:

    Vande Velde is not a player who is going to get much better. I’m surprised that he still makes prospect lists.

    If he ever has a niche in the NHL, and I have my doubts, it will be as a fourth line guy only. He simply… isn’t a good enough hockey player to be anything else.

    As for value contracts, I think if the Oilers keep a steady stream of their picks coming, and perhaps let some of their prospects bubble under a little longer than they have in the past (‘you can skate backwards?!? You can play in our top four, with PP time!’), then maybe they can keep a steady stream of value contracts to surround the big ones that are inevitably going to drop on Nugent-Hopkins, Hall, Eberle, Yakupov and probably Schultz. And hey, there’s nothing to say that some or all of Paajarvi, Gagner and Petry take similiar steps forward and command big money.

    I think the first shoe needs to drop. They have four forwards who can probably all expect to command similiar money. It may be as simple as taking Hall or Eberle’s contract number and multiplying it by four to see how much of a cap hit the top of the team is going to take up. If they could ink Hall for less than a seven million dollar cap hit, I think it would be a wonderful sign that they may be able to sign them all at a rate that will let them fill out all 23 roster spots in the future at more than league minimum. I would offer Hall seven years at six, and give him up to a million dollar more per year, but emphasize the point is to pay him well, but at such a rate, they’ll be able to keep everyone together. I think Hall wants his millions, like any young man, but probably wants to have multiple cracks at a championship more. Mid-sixes cap hit might do that. If you have Hall at 6.5 per season, I think it might be hard to argue, if you’re Yakupov, Nugent-Hopkins or Eberle, even if you put up somewhat superior numbers, to grab more than seven million.

    If you could ink all four of them for about 27 million, and we expect the cap to expand somewhat, I think they’re in a good position to sign the rest of their key pieces. Petry might re-sign for five, Schultz for five and a half, and if you’ve already inked Gagner (which I would) for approximately four million per over five seasons, Smid at four, and Dubnyk (or similar) re-upped at four and a half million, you could have your top five forwards, top three defencemen and your top goalie, by far your most expensive group, under contract for $46 million. But you may have to move quickly on some of these contracts, and get them inked before the cap expands again. But if you do, and the cap expands again, by, say, another eight million, I think thirty two million is plenty for the mid-level and lower-end roster players. There may even be room on the roster for another high end piece.

  7. Downright Fierce says:

    IMO Fedun’s biggest hurdles will be getting his reads back up to pro speed & maintaining his endurance. I think people will be surprised by how good his skating will look in main camp.

    Agree with most that AHL seasoning is required. Glad OKC is in a good position to accommodate his development.

  8. Halfwise says:

    I am amazed that NHL revenues have expanded to the point that the cap is $70 million. The US economy is in the tank featuring unemployment and house prices and pricy gasoline and all that, and the NHL has revenues growing? It’s little surprises like this that keep me from being a millionaire in the stock market, I tell ya.

    So a couple of business questions. If the cap follows the economy down some year, what do teams do with all those contracts? And what if the exchange rate goes 20% higher in our favour? Do Canadian revenues start to drive up the cap floor, killing Florida and Nashville? If it goes the other way, then what?

    Value contracts are value only in the context of the reigning insanity not necessarily future insanity.

  9. bookje says:

    You missed Dubnyk.

  10. bookje says:

    Halfwise:
    I am amazed that NHL revenues have expanded to the point that the cap is $70 million.The US economy is in the tank featuring unemployment and house prices and pricy gasoline and all that, and the NHL has revenues growing?It’s little surprises like this that keep me from being a millionaire in the stock market, I tell ya.

    So a couple of business questions.If the cap follows the economy down some year, what do teams do with all those contracts?And what if the exchange rate goes 20% higher in our favour?Do Canadian revenues start to drive up the cap floor, killing Florida and Nashville?If it goes the other way, then what?

    Value contracts are value only in the context of the reigning insanity not necessarily future insanity.

    Salaries are essentially tied to league revenues (somehow, I don’t quite have the details) so if revenue is less than anticipated, then the salaries get reduced

  11. "Steve Smith" says:

    bookje: Salaries are essentially tied to league revenues (somehow, I don’t quite have the details) so if revenue is less than anticipated, then the salaries get reduced

    Which they always are; the actual cap is some unspecified figure significantly below $70 million.

  12. Smarmy says:

    Ah yes the dreaded Escrow. I don’t know the details of that but the players get a certain percentage of their pay cheques deducted and get some or all of it back when revenues are confirmed.

  13. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    What is the waiver situation on MPS, Harti and Fedun? are they all safe for a year of ups and downs?

    I’d be shocked if Fedun starts in the NHL this season. If he can make a go of it in the AHL for 10-20 games, I’d think that was exceptional news considering his injury. But, if he can push the other guys we’ll be looking a lot stronger on D already.

    I take it he’d make a better call up option (assuming he’s healthy) than Plante or Teubert?

  14. LMHF#1 says:

    LT – correct me if I’m wrong, but haven’t you always been exceptionally conservative when it comes to Eberle, only to have him blow you away every time?

    As I see it, you have 2 choices – you can either continue on doing this as a sort of superstition, or you can upgrade your expectations into line with his performances. He’s ALWAYS delivered. There’s zero reason to think he’ll stop now.

  15. Woodguy says:

    “Steve Smith”: Which they always are; the actual cap is some unspecified figure significantly below $70 million.

    Of course the Actual NHL Revenues are a moving target as well.

    Usually they are just right in order to move the cap to a place high enough for Ed Snider to hang himself with.

  16. DeadmanWaking says:

    Halfwise,

    If you found the dozen lawyers and economists who drafted the current CBA and asked them about this, you’d get 13 different answers. The CBA is a form of central planning. Central planning is the best of all possible systems until a messy world refuses to cooperate. I was listening to a Dan Carlin podcast last night. Carlin positions himself as a contrarian for insomniacs with a longer than average attention span. The vibe is a bit like call-in radio where you have to solve a 50 letter CAPTCHA in order to dial in. He was arguing in favour of the dark horse, which is this election cycle is Ron Paul. He was arguing that Paul getting a few of the big issues right, such as taking constitutional freedoms seriously, makes up for 50 other screwballs things. I think that’s how you have to look at the CBA.

    First of all, major sports leagues essentially operate as chartered monopolies. This is the last thing in the world the major leagues wish to talk about, but they take their special dispensation very seriously, and bend over backward not to leave a loophole open permitting an aggrieved party to mount a constitutional challenge. Outwardly they strut around projecting an aura of entitlement. Inwardly, they grin like the fox in a henhouse. Special dispensation to print money? Priceless. Just look how spooked they are about the KHL trapdoor. My god, it vaguely resembles actual competition. So far it’s just a rash that might affect one or two teams per season. Everyone attends the scouting combine wearing Asian moped masks.

    The geographical reality in North America means that a major hockey league runs on quasi-communist principles. Television networks want programming that appeals to the national audience. Media is a turvy industry, barely stable enough to work a proper five year plan. A national league consists of cities that are seriously into Dahu on wheels. The only way to claw into the sunbelt is to throw economic subsidies over the Mason-Dixie line. Problem for Bettman: some of the deep pockets would rather be rich now, than later. Inside the Executive E-mails and Cannibalistic Culture That Felled a Tech Giant. There were vested interests in short-term profitability, and those profits were flowing from Office and Windows. Vested interests who are long in the tooth fixate on cash flow. America was founded on fleeing the 1% and now the elites whose great-grandparents originally fled the 1% are setting up shop as the new (hereditary) 1% Amazing how rarely the shadowy conservatives discuss Madison or Jefferson or Franklin. They are mainly conservative if you go back before those radical chumps. Nasty constitution, we hates it.

    My point about the CBA is that these big-picture issues run so deep, you can only examine the small stuff as a thin facade of rationality. What Bettman accomplished with the last CBA is dramatically increasing the size of the pot (hence the cap escalation). This bodes well for averting another lock-out year: there’s more to lose.

    The second big picture item for Bettman is to extirpate the dynasty era. When you’re clawing for moisture in the sun belt, the last thing you want is Montreal or Detroit winning five cups in a row. Fact of the matter: any cup won by a Canadian city is a wasted photo op. This is a funny business, because the idea of sports is to compete, yet all the rules are tilted toward making the season outcome a coin flip. Before parity, a team could sometimes survive a major injury. Not any more. There’s still this lingering concept of what a 1st line center looks like, or a 1D, or a top goalie, as if there are enough of these out there for every team to have all three. Nope. Most teams have at least one of these that’s more than a bit suspect. Winning teams are the ones that survive their weakness (like the Kings and their PP).

    The third big item was to prevent hard-rolling GMs from excessively mortgaging their futures to survive today. This is why the cap formula is blind to age. It’s taken some entertainment and skill out of the game (at the GM level) in making trades so hard to consummate. The GMs are working more to keep the league in business on a national scale than to make their teams better for the next cup run.

    Of course, the details all blow up and you get these 13-year contracts sprouting like weeds. But this is the same thing coaches say about rule changes. You can easily change a rule to improve the game for a season or three. But then the coaches figure out how to exploit the new reality, and you soon have a problem just as big as the old one.

    Agreement on the CBA is achieved among people who are financially-driven politicians, few of whom have graduate degrees in systems theory. Even if the CBA was written by the RAND corporation, it would still suffer from the law of the unexpected. And the RAND people would have to assume that the people governed by the mathematically sophisticated CBA can perceive their self interest, which under such a document, would be far from the truth. This is the problem with nuclear deterrence. It works great among highly sophisticated nation states who can actually do the math. Not so great among rogue states with leaders who apprenticed at the Mike Milbury school of management. One of these guys is going to put a gun to his own head and pull the trigger, expecting a good result. I guess I’ve just added a footnote to my recent post on deterrence as the Bermuda triangle of rational discourse.

    For the Roman empire, when the plunder was good, the state was strong. Political unity was achieved on the back of a tide of gold arriving from neighbouring states. This has a way of making even a Roman politician modestly agreeable. Bettman’s core objective is to convince all the parties at the next CBA negotiation that the plunder is good. If they believe that, they’ll behave like good Romans.

    Roman politics was a noisy business even when it worked well. And that’s how the current CBA handles things like currency fluctuation. Aggrieved parties need to squeak loudly. There’s some stuff built in to manage these problems well enough in the short run that the political process has time to play out: not solutions so much as temporary mitigations.

    Even the wonks behind the scene who framed the CBA would not depict the various clauses as having the same purpose or effect. I’m sure many clauses were worded around objections from specific teams that might or might not have been rational.

    These are very hard documents to dissect in the smaller details.

  17. Woodguy says:

    I like a player who:

    1) Was a World Men’s Hockey Championship All Star at 19
    2) Scored 15 goals as a 19 year old rookie in a lesser role

    I see a lot of Opening Day Lineups in the other threads and PRV isn’t even there.

    This guy is a hockey player.

    Out of all the Oilers from last year, the new coach might make the biggest difference to 91.

  18. striatic says:

    Woodguy,

    he’ll have lots of opportunity in TC to shoot the lights out, i imagine.

  19. Woodguy says:

    DeadmanWaking,

    This is the problem with nuclear deterrence. It works great among highly sophisticated nation states who can actually do the math. Not so great among rogue states with leaders who apprenticed at the Mike Milbury school of management. One of these guys is going to put a gun to his own head and pull the trigger, expecting a good result.

    That’s one of the best things I’ve read in months.

    Great post.

  20. Woodguy says:

    For the record, I’ll make a CBA negotiation prediction.

    1) No lockout. They’d play with no agreement rather than not play. That’s both sides.

    2) Agreement to somewhere near 51.5% of revenues go to salaries.

    3) No roll back. Cap stays where it is until such time that NHL revenues hit a point where a $70MM cap is 52% of revenues.

    4) Escrow is gone.

    5) Rookies/Young players get fucked out of more money somehow.

    Also,

    The NHL Revenues will be discovered to be high enough to raise the cap when Ed Snider signs Lupul to a 10 years 8.6MM/yr deal, probably in 2014/15

  21. Professor Q says:

    Woodguy,

    I believe it has already been stated by Bettman or someone that there would still be a full season even if negotiations were not completed by season’s start.

  22. Woodguy says:

    Professor Q:
    Woodguy,

    I believe it has already been stated by Bettman or someone that there would still be a full season even if negotiations were not completed by season’s start.

    See, I’m right already.

    :)

  23. TheOtherJohn says:

    Have no clue how anyone believes the CBA helped Bettman grow total  league wide revenue. Simply not sure of connection. There is no question that the 7-9-11 year contracts signed by 40 players so far were not contemplated by anyone. But the piper does not have to be paid till we  have  superstar XX  performing in a very mediocre fashion, in the last 3-4 years of his  9 year contract , and yet is still eating up 10 or 12 % of the cap. (cough…… Horcoff) We could see 4-5 teams actully throw the keys to their franchises back on the legues table because at that time in a gate driven league  they have no ticket buying fans

    It’s very very rare when everyone is increasing their pay cheques by 2 – 3 – 4 (Dubnyk) times that labour (the players) are sufficiently angry to try and hold onto existing terms, little alone demanding more. Expect owners will lockout players till roughly till the 3rd week in November. The goal will be a contractual limit on  4 or possibly 5 years on all NHL contracts moving forward

  24. Cactus says:

    Woodguy:
    DeadmanWaking,

    This is the problem with nuclear deterrence. It works great among highly sophisticated nation states who can actually do the math. Not so great among rogue states with leaders who apprenticed at the Mike Milbury school of management. One of these guys is going to put a gun to his own head and pull the trigger, expecting a good result.

    That’s one of the best things I’ve read in months.

    Great post.

    I agree. Great stuff Deadman. I’m stealing that next time I’m teaching an international relations seminar.

  25. nathan says:

    wg that was actually fehr. like the nuclear deterrence with small minds thing the owners will fear a strike late in the season and will lock out early

  26. striatic says:

    can we talk about Carlo Colaiacovo’s underlying stats? i’ve been intrigued by his Corsi Rel QoC since the last time he was a UFA and while i doubt the Oilers are interested in him due to injury concerns, i wonder if maybe they should look at signing him. he’s still available.

  27. Lowetide says:

    Striatic: I looked at him right after the season, the numbers were solid. Surprised he’s still out there, must be as you say injury worry.

  28. striatic says:

    Lowetide,

    if you’re looking for value contracts, that could be one although he’s been a UFA before and re-signed with STL even though they weren’t looking nearly as good as they do now.

    he may have strong ties to his team and want to re-sign again and the negotiations have become protracted due to suture and carla being on the market.

  29. slopitch says:

    Interesting idea from Stauffer about Phoenix being dispersed. Whoever gets OEL in that scenario … Wowza. Oh well he mentioned it was hypothetical

    LT when mentioning value contracts, how can you not mention Horcoff or Khabby ;)

  30. vishcosity says:

    projected spending 2014 – 15

    Hall 6.0
    Eberle 6.0
    RNH 6.0
    Yak 6.0
    Getzlaf 6.0
    Horcoff 5.5
    Gagner 4.0
    MPS 4.0
    Reider 1.0
    Jones 1.0
    Eager 1.0
    Hartski 1.0
    Petrell 1.0
    Horti 1.0

    Petry 4.0
    Smid 4.0
    Schultz 4.0
    Whitney 4.0
    Schultz 4.0
    Klefbom 4.0
    Tubert 1.0

    Dubnyk 4.0
    Roy 1.0

    Total = 79.5M

    If the future plan is to hope the US Fed continue to print money and drive the value of fiat notes to the toilet, this just might work. Burying the Horc contract may suffice else.

    Requiring any of the random 1.0′s to be contributors rather than warm bodies who don’t necessarily let the puck in the net on every other shift may be all it takes to finally win the tournament again.

  31. stevezie says:

    Value contracts. This article perfectly explains where the grounds to criticize the Dubnyk contract come from.

    Devon Dubnyk is our starting goalie. Paying your starting goalie 3.5 is not a bad deal. It’s a fine deal. That said, Dubynk probably has the thinnest resume of everyone in his payrange . Looking at the numbers of guys like Varlamov, Howard and Crawford it does seem like the Oilers missed out on a chance to underpay somebody, which as LT shows, is a key to winning in this league.

    It’s not a bad contract, Dubnyk’s agent just beat management. If Josh Harding didn’t negotiate that last deal himself he threw 5% of it away on nothing. Poor Vokoun is probably deciding if it’s enough to fire his agent, or does he need to go ahead and murder him?

    Speaking of value contracts, if Corey Potter shows that his two hot months last year were the real Corey Potter than he is definitely one. I don’t like his odds, but I don’t think they’re any worse than Fedun’s.

  32. Ryan says:

    stevezie,

    I haven’t looked at the underlying numbers, but Potter sure looked like a player pre-injury. IIRC the guy had the coveted ‘calm feet.’ At the time, everyone was waiting for his game to decline which it inevitably did. I’ll be curious to see if there’s anything left.

  33. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    Woodguy:
    DeadmanWaking,

    This is the problem with nuclear deterrence. It works great among highly sophisticated nation states who can actually do the math. Not so great among rogue states with leaders who apprenticed at the Mike Milbury school of management. One of these guys is going to put a gun to his own head and pull the trigger, expecting a good result.

    That’s one of the best things I’ve read in months.

    Great post.

    Great post Deadman…. Nice snip WG… it makes for an interesting point.

    However, the complexity of the psychological argument of MAD is simplified a little too much here. The assumptions go beyond rational actors engaging in brinkmanship held in check by self-preservation. This situation was always disturbed by the intrusion of moral speech: the ‘enemy’ is not merely a ‘combatant’ but a ‘cipher of evil’, a ‘communist’, ‘godless’ etc.

    Dehumanizing moral speech coupled with morally aggrandizing speech concerning oneself and one’s aspirations creates a cultural context that paves the way for a slippage of the assumptions of MAD. The various crises of the 20th century (Cuba for example) show how hard it can be to maintain the moral values of one’s own righteousness, forthrightness and the evil of the other in the face of the powerful need for self-preservation. The two come in conflict.

    Ultimately, sovereign states operating ‘rationally’ to protect themselves and their interests have mitigated the effects of moral speech for the most part. However, in the increasingly complex world of global affairs this equation becomes much more troublesome.

    One area where you can see this to be the case is Iran. The principles of MAD for the moment hold, however, what is going to erode them quicker than anything (if anything does) will not be a lack of rational action on Iran’s part, but rather the assumption of a lack of rational action by Iran on the part of its ‘enemies.’ That assumption — that we are no longer dealing with a rational actor — is enough to break the assumptions of MAD. Or, Iran doesn’t need to act like a rogue state — it can continue to seek hegemonic power over its region — as long as its actions are interpreted as ‘rogue’ the assumptions of MAD fail.

  34. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    slopitch:
    Interesting idea from Stauffer about Phoenix being dispersed. Whoever gets OEL in that scenario … Wowza. Oh well he mentioned it was hypothetical

    LT when mentioning value contracts, how can you not mention Horcoff or Khabby

    Yes… please… OEL!!! that would sure pep-up the D!!

    is that the current thinking by the way? that Phoenix will be dispersed, rather than moved… or some combination of both, whereby QC or Markham gets a team full of also-rans?

    Ryan:
    stevezie,

    I haven’t looked at the underlying numbers, but Potter sure looked like a player pre-injury.IIRC the guy had the coveted ‘calm feet.’At the time, everyone was waiting for his game to decline which it inevitably did.I’ll be curious to see if there’s anything left.

    that’s an interesting point about Potter. He did seem to be blazing out of the gate. But as I recall, noise was still abounding back then that he was only going to be a net positive if he continued to put up points, most of which he got on the PP (a highly valued spot now that Whitney may be healthy, Petry is blossoming and J. Schultz will be back there too).

    One thing’s for sure though: pre-injury Potter last year was a sight better than post. like two different players. I don’t know if pre-injury Potter is good enough to make the team ahead of Sutton, Peckham, Teubert, Fedun, Plante… but he is way better than post-injury Potter!

  35. vishcosity says:

    DeadmanWaking:

    America was founded on fleeing the 1% and now the elites whose great-grandparents originally fled the 1% are setting up shop as the new (hereditary) 1%. Amazing how rarely the shadowy conservatives discuss Madison or Jefferson or Franklin.They are mainly conservative if you go back before those radical chumps. Nasty constitution, we hates it.

    For the Roman empire, when the plunder was good, the state was strong…Bettman’s core objective is to convince all the parties at the next CBA negotiation that the plunder is good. If they believe that, they’ll behave like good Romans.

    Romulus Apotheosis:

    The principles of MAD for the moment hold, however, what is going to erode them quicker than anything (if anything does) will not be a lack of rational action on Iran’s part, but rather the assumption of a lack of rational action by Iran on the part of its ‘enemies.’

    Maybe the only thing saving the current Roman regime is the lack of the 99%’s realization of the madness of the new 1%. If the 99 join Iran as the new reason, as in, get your pesky ‘democracy’ off my land, then maybe there is a chance the salary cap could go down, there is a chance the rats get off the ship, there is a chance that the US dollars don’t take the zimbabwe model.

    If its realized that MAD is actually the new rational, and today’s Romans realize the only remaining connection to Madison is our seeing his face on their dirty bills, maybe then cities will become restless, ready to pounce.

    Instead, almost assuredly, the cap will rise while the rats hope there’s nothing 99% will do when I’m between their thighs.

    They give us words to memorize, words to hypnotize still words all fail the magic prize. Share a smoke, make a joke, grasp and reach for a leg of hope.

    Maybe one day we’ll add it up.

  36. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Woodguy: Usually they are just right in order to move the cap to a place high enough for Ed Snider to hang himself with.

    This made me laugh. It’s also the hockey gods’ truth.

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