FARJESTAD V BRYNAS 4.10.12

Oscar Klefbom (8, 0-2-2 +6) and Farjestad take on Brynas today in SEL action. Klefbom didn’t play much in the third period in the last game–a blowout win–but the pre-game chatter doesn’t have anything on an injury to the Oilers young defense prospect.

This report includes the following:

  • Färjestad lacks just as before Anton Grundel (concussion)

So my guess is that Klefbom will be in the lineup today. We’re about 15% into the SEL season and Klefbom is showing well. He is 4th on Farjestad in D TOI per game (18:47) and leads all SEL defensemen in plus minus (he’s in a three-way tie).

Farjested is in 7th place and good things happen when Klefbom plays over 20 minutes.

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24 Responses to "FARJESTAD V BRYNAS 4.10.12"

  1. striatic says:

    sounds like he’s solid.

    curious about the offensive upside. 4 points in 8 games is pretty good but doesn’t scream elite D either.

    I could see a future pairing of Schultz the younger and Klefbom working out though.

  2. regwald says:

    striatic:
    sounds like he’s solid.

    curious about the offensive upside. 4 points in 8 games is pretty good but doesn’t scream elite D either.

    You mean 2 pts in 8 games ? 0-2-2 is 0 goals, 2 assists for a total of 2 points.

    His offence is a big suspect. However, let’s talk at Christmas time before we right off his offence potential.

  3. WeridAl says:

    LT what I understand is that Klefbom blocked a shot with his foot and they let him sit as a precaution in the last game. Was practicing the next day and should play in next game.

  4. engineer says:

    Oscar Klefbom är i dag med från start igen. Calle Andersson inleder som sjundeback och Max Görtz är extraforward.

    “Oscar Klefbom remains in the line-up. Calle Andersson will dress as 7th dman, while Max Görtz will dress as the 13th forward.”

    Guess the benches are longer across the Øresund.

  5. rickithebear says:

    LT:
    Migel Cabrera:
    Top 4 in Bat AL/NL 5 of 7 Seasons
    Top 6 in HR Al/NL 5 of 7 Seasons
    Top 6 In RBI AL/NL 5 oF 7 Seasons

    the last 3 seasons BAT HR RBI
    top 3 in 7 of 9 total
    1st in 5 of the 9

    Last three years he has Bat & RBI covered 66% of the time.
    Last 5 years HR covered 40% of the time.
    By shear probability he should be getting a triple crown every 5 years.

    Is a second Triple crown possible?
    Smaller park baseball:
    Hornsby 22, 25
    Fox 33
    Klein 33
    Gehrig 34
    Medwick 37
    Williams 42, 47
    Mantle 56
    Robinson 66
    Yastremski 67
    Cabrera 2012

  6. engineer says:

    Klefbom: 4:44, no scoreline, in the 1st.

    1-1 tie.

  7. LMHF#1 says:

    Cabrera wins the triple crown, but posts no eye-popping totals and there are SEVEN no-hitters this year?

    Time to lower the mound.

  8. Hot Eire says:

    End of second. Oscar Klefbom 0-1-1 +1 and Farjestad up 2-1

  9. rickithebear says:

    LMHF#1,

    I am a tradtionalist.
    Baseball would be better seved with a move back.

    http://www.baseballgloves.com/aboutgloves/index.html

    Golf too!

    http://www.playhickory.com/playing_hickory.htm

    Lower the Mound! Yeesh!

  10. Nicholas says:

    Disregarding what is and isn’t ‘fair’ when it comes to the owners vs the NHLPA, I can’t figure out, mathematically, why it makes sense for the NHLPA as a whole to not settle sooner rather than later.

    From Capgeek, the committed salaries for 2012-2013 is $1.76 billion (cap hit is $1.80 billion).

    First, we assume there is a minimum of 690 NHLPA members (I have no idea what the requirements are for membership – are fringe NHLers playing overseas still members?), that is 30 teams times 23 players.

    Of those, the top 100 players account (all of whom are making at least $4.6m in salary next year) account for $655.8 million in total salary – around 37% of committed salary dollars going to 14.5% of the players. They are making, on average, $6.5m each.

    The top 200 players (all of whom make at least $3.6m), account for a full 60% of all salary dollars, and are still averaging $5.25m each.

    That means the remaining 490 players are collectively taking in 40% of the salary dollars and averaging just $1.4m each.

    I believe it was Jonathan Willis who pointed out that last lockout, there were 214 players who never played another game in the NHL. I’m assuming most of those would come from the latter group rather than the high paid stars, too.

    Take Ryan Jones for example – if he takes a 10% haircut, that’s $150k, compared to $1.1m for Kovalchuk. What’s the incentive for the fringe NHLer to support holding out here, especially with a lockout potentially meaning they never play in the NHL again? Why is he sitting out for something that most benefits the top third of the league?

    What would happen if the ‘bottom 490′ players told Fehr to get a deal done at a 50-50 split so we can get back to playing? It’s not like they are getting a lot of solidarity from the top players who are all running off to Europe to play…

  11. Dipstick says:

    Nicholas:
    Disregarding what is and isn’t ‘fair’ when it comes to the owners vs the NHLPA, I can’t figure out, mathematically, why it makes sense for the NHLPA as a whole to not settle sooner rather than later.

    From Capgeek, the committed salaries for 2012-2013 is $1.76 billion (cap hit is $1.80 billion).

    First,we assume there is a minimum of 690 NHLPA members (I have no idea what the requirements are for membership – are fringe NHLers playing overseas still members?), that is 30 teams times 23 players.

    Of those, the top 100 players account (all of whom are making at least $4.6m in salary next year) account for $655.8 million in total salary – around 37% of committed salary dollars going to 14.5% of the players. They are making, on average, $6.5m each.

    The top 200 players (all of whom make at least $3.6m), account for a full 60% of all salary dollars, and are still averaging $5.25m each.

    That means the remaining 490 players are collectively taking in 40% of the salary dollars and averaging just $1.4m each.

    I believe it was Jonathan Willis who pointed out that last lockout, there were 214 players who never played another game in the NHL. I’m assuming most of those would come from the latter group rather than the high paid stars, too.

    Take Ryan Jones for example – if he takes a 10% haircut, that’s $150k, compared to $1.1m for Kovalchuk. What’s the incentive for the fringe NHLer to support holding out here, especially with a lockout potentially meaning they never play in the NHL again? Why is he sitting out for something that most benefits the top third of the league?

    What would happen if the ‘bottom 490′ players told Fehr to get a deal done ata 50-50 split so we can get back to playing? It’s not like they are getting a lot of solidarity from the top players who are all running off to Europe to play…

    Meanwhile most of the lower end players are sitting at home or working at other jobs while Kovalchuk makes big bucks overseas. Solidarity forever!

  12. gogliano says:

    I don’t think it makes any sense economically. Very few players stand to gain from a protracted work stoppage, in part because the bulk of players have very short careers.

    But a) human beings aren’t good at doing cost/benefit calculations in their own case (e.g. most players will assume a better result for them as an indivdual going forward than justified by league averages) b) when it comes to one’s career, considerations usually go beyond the economic (e.g. fairness motivates the players)

  13. Reg Dunlop says:

    Nicholas,

    ‘Why is he sitting out for something that most benefits the top third of the league’. This is the type of union-breaking propaganda always spouted by management during contract negotiations. The credo of a union is negotiate together or beg alone.Having said that you are 100% correct about questioning the commitment of those players who book it overseas. They are doing management’s job for them regarding divide-and -conquer union busting.

  14. Nicholas says:

    Reg Dunlop,

    Indeed – but shouldn’t the goal of the union to do what is best for the majority of it’s membership? If something is a good deal for 50%+1 of the union, should they proceed? What if that’s more like 2/3rds?

    Also, do the economics of ‘normal’ unions transfer to professional sports as well? If you are a 30 year old welder you still have, potentially, decades of working life ahead of you, you are looking at this for the long haul. A 30 year old NHLer could be out of the league next year so I would have thought that their would be a greater focus on short term pain/gain.

  15. Reg Dunlop says:

    Nicholas,

    Ideally,majority should rule. However, in any group a vocal minority can have a disproportional amount of sway. Is that happening here? I think those that stand to benefit most from avoiding a roll-back are already in Europe so I see Fehr the hardliner being responsible for keeping the rank-and-file remaining here on board. That won’t last as long as the owners resolve will. Eventually a settlement will be reached that allows Fehr to claim a victory which seems as important to him as getting a deal done.

    We are the only losers in this situation, and if we spend the lost NHL hours with our families instead, then everyone wins. Or, we all get divorced because we are insufferable without our oilers.

  16. till_horcoff_is_coach says:

    Reg Dunlop:
    Nicholas,

    ‘Why is he sitting out for something that most benefits the top third of the league’. This is the type of union-breaking propaganda always spouted by management during contract negotiations. The credo of a union isnegotiate together or beg alone.Having said that you are 100% correct aboutquestioning the commitment of those players who book it overseas. They are doing management’s job for them regarding divide-and -conquer union busting.

    Are you sure? Strengthening other markets and opportunities gives the NHLPA more leverage in the future.

    The players don’t have much leverage, but going forward they will probably never have as much leverage as now with a number of teams in threat of moving and the new sponsorship deals the NHL wants to maintain.

    Fehr has always pointed to a short-term deal. Considering the lack of leverage for the PA, it seems an odd choice. The only two reasons would be to make the player market more fluid and to renegotiate before the NFL and NBA (which have both hurt the NHLPA position after recent concessions).

    So looking at the long game, it makes sense to have the p layers get comfortable going overseas and to have those leagues comfortable to accept them. The NHL maintains all the leverage as long as they are the defacto choice for players. If players start to defect then the NHL would have to negotiate with the union with the context of a free market available externally.

  17. till_horcoff_is_coach says:

    Also, Fehr has to break Bettman’s strangle of the owners and he can’t do that by caving too early. Bettman has stacked the deck to give him carte-blanche in negotiations and unwavering support during them. That’s messed up.

    Seriously a 30k fine for speaking bad of the refs but 250k for bad mouthing the league during labour relations… wow.

    I may not support the PA’s demands, but you’d think this lockout is putting Bettman in the hot-seat for some of the lesser owners.

    Hopefully this is Bettman’s last ride in the driver’s seat.

  18. Lowetide says:

    One of the only good things about this lockout is that the Toronto’s gain basically nothing–and I mean nothing–from this lockout. I mean it’s incredible.

  19. DSF says:

    Lowetide:
    One of the only good things about this lockout is that the Toronto’s gain basically nothing–and I mean nothing–from this lockout. I mean it’s incredible.

    Are you sure about this?

    The Leafs have 5 high end defensive prospects who will benefit from additional development time….Reilly, Finn, Holzer, Blacker, and Percy.

    Reilly is 5 GP 2G 3A 5P with Moose Jaw.

    Finn is 4 GP 1G 3A 4P with Guelph.

    Percy 4GP 2G 0A 2 P with Mississauga

    Blacker, Holzer and Gysbers are all thought to be NHL ready but could all use another shot in the AHL.

    And that’s just the defense.

    A t forward, Kadri, Colborne, Biggs, Ashton, McKegg and Komorov are all bubbling under.

    All of them will benefit from some time in the A.

    There’s no doubt there’s no Yakupov in that group but suggesting the Leafs will have no benefit from a lockout is just silly.

    The Leafs are younger than the Oilers so, by definition they will benefit more.

    How do you think Horcoff, Sutton, Hemsky and Whitney will look a year from now?

  20. Schitzo says:

    Nicholas:

    I believe it was Jonathan Willis who pointed out that last lockout, there were 214 players who never played another game in the NHL. I’m assuming most of those would come from the latter group rather than the high paid stars, too.

    I’m not sure whether we’d see the same kind of cull this time around – I’m assuming that the bulk of those 214 players were a combination of old(er) and overpaid. That would be the kiss of death in a salary cap world. This time around, the 3rd and 4th liners pretty much already fit into the salary cap grid.

  21. mattwatt says:

    DSF: Are you sure about this?The Leafs have 5 high end defensive prospects who will benefit from additional development time….Reilly, Finn, Holzer, Blacker, and Percy.Reilly is 5 GP 2G 3A 5P with Moose Jaw.Finn is 4 GP 1G 3A 4P with Guelph.Percy 4GP 2G 0A 2 P with MississaugaBlacker, Holzer and Gysbers are all thought to be NHL ready but could all use another shot in the AHL.And that’s just the defense.A t forward, Kadri, Colborne, Biggs, Ashton, McKegg and Komorov are all bubbling under.All of them will benefit from some time in the A.There’s no doubt there’s no Yakupov in that group but suggesting the Leafs will have no benefit from a lockout is just silly.The Leafs are younger than the Oilers so, by definition they will benefit more.How do you think Horcoff, Sutton, Hemsky and Whitney will look a year from now?

    I think with Kadri DSF, you meant marbling, not bubbling. At least that is how Scott Eakins sees it.

    Oh yeah, and ignore the high end skills of RNH, Yakupov, Eberle, Hall, Klefbom, Schultz. None of those kids will make it.

    Unlike the ones in the Leafs system.

  22. Danenbaum says:

    Farjestad won 4-1. Our boy Oscar picked up an Apple and a +1. Through 9 games, Klefbom is 0-3-3 +7 and tied with CDN Jason Krog for the Elitserien League lead in +/-. among all skaters

  23. DSF says:

    mattwatt: I think with Kadri DSF, you meant marbling, not bubbling. At least that is how Scott Eakins sees it.

    Oh yeah, and ignore the high end skills of RNH, Yakupov, Eberle, Hall, Klefbom, Schultz. None of those kids will make it.

    Unlike the ones in the Leafs system.

    Oh I am sure those 5 you mentioned will benefit from another year of development but suggesting the 11 young Leafs players won’t receive any benefit from the lockout is a bit puzzling.

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