CANUCKS AT OILERS G34 (12-13) 30.3.13

Ryan Nugent-Hopkins took his time joining the offensive parade this season, but a recent flurry (1-8-9 in his last 10gp) has the Nuge back in black and looking good. Should the Oilers be looking to add at the deadline? How far behind expectations are they currently?


Before the season began, I posted an updated ‘reasonable expectation’ for team goals for and against.

2012-13 PROJECTION (48 GAMES)

  • TOTAL GOALS FOR: 131
  • TOTAL GOALS AGAINST: 138 (including 7 EN goals)
  • GOALS PER GAME AVERAGE: 2.73 (2.52 last season)
  • GOALS AGAINST PER GAME AVERAGE: 2.88 (2.83 last season)

Now, the totals above are pure GF-GA, I take them from nhl.com and they are the pure numbers. If you go to tsn, you’ll see 83-95 GF/GA (-12) for the Oilers in 33gp, but that isn’t the real number.

2012-13 ACTUAL (33 GAMES)

  • TOTAL GOALS FOR: 81
  • TOTAL GOALS AGAINST: 92
  • GOALS PER GAME AVERAGE: 2.45 (2.52 last season)
  • GOALS AGAINST PER GAME AVERAGE: 2.79 (2.83 last season)

I projected the Oilers to be -7 over 48 games, they are -11 over 33 games. Certainly well within the range of expectation, and of course that number can improve if the team doesn’t sell at the deadline and add prospects and picks who can’t help the big club during April. Interesting to see that the offense and defense are almost identical to one year ago. Why? Well, as much as the top half of the roster is helping, the bottom half is hurting. If they can stay healthy, I think this team could be better than -7 by season’s end. It’s really encouraging. Seriously.

I think the playoffs are probably gone, but getting this GF-GA number closer to do is a big deal.

On the other hand, important indicators like Fenwick Close tells us there’s still plenty of work to do this summer. What needs to happen? Well, depending on the names of those who survive the week and are signed to new deals (hello, Laddy!) we might start the summer with this:

  • Goal: Devan Dubnyk, Ben Bishop or similar
  • Defense: Ladislav Smid-Jeff Petry; Capable top 4D-Justin Schultz; Oscar Klefbom-Nick Schultz; Corey Potter
  • Line 1: Nuge-Hall-Eberle
  • Line 2: Gagner-Paajarvi-Yakupov
  • Line 3: Horcoff-Hartikainen-Hemsky
  • Line 4: Jim Dowd-Boyd Devereaux-George Laraque from 1999
  • Extras: L Ryan Smyth, R Mike Brown

One feature player (the blue), one guy who might cost a top 100 pick (goalie) and then three guys a normal NHL team can cobble together on day 12 of free agency.


The trade deadline is close now, we know a few things:

  • The Oilers are talking contract with Ladislav Smid.
  • smid contractJay Bouwmeester is available and makes sense for the Oilers. Do the Oilers make sense for Jay Bouwmeester?
  • Lubo is signed now, Streit may be next and the free agent pool for D this summer is decidedly poor.
  • Ales Hemsky rumors are beginning to build–not as strong as one year ago but there are rumblings.
  • Ryan Jones may be getting some interest.

Big test for the Oilers tonight. Smid-Petry and the Schultz boys are going to be busy, and coach Krueger is going to have to line match–simple as that. I don’t think the club’s chances of winning are close to 50%, would guess they’ll have to play their best game of the season to win. The good news is that if they can win, or gain one point, the two games against the Flames this coming week may help them sustain a point streak.

I think the Oilers are starting to find the range offensively, but the defensive mistakes that cost goals continue. That’s an issue that will have to be addressed by trade or free agency, defensemen who don’t make a lot of mistakes are dear.

I’m hopeful the Oilers come back with Devan Dubnyk tonight, he’s having a fine season. Goaltending isn’t the problem.

One of these days, Taylor Hall is going to score a bunch of points to put this scoring race to bed. Maybe tonight? He’s 4-8-12 in his last 9 games and is (as always) a chance machine.

hemsky22I don’t want anyone who reads this blog to feel sorry for the Calgary Flames. They are the enemy. This tweet from the hockey club reflects an arrogance unearned, and things like Craig Conroy’s comments on Shawn Horcoff years ago and the Regehr damage over many years should never be forgotten. I know the opponent is Vancouver tonight, but I’m working up a good lather for the back to back against Calgary this coming week.

-

I think the Oilers trade Ryan Whitney, and could deal Fistric too. Peckham needs a new home. However, I think this might be the time to offload Nick Schultz. Thoughts?

Lowetide at High Noon hits Team 1260 today at noon Edmonton time. It’ll be archived right after the show (courtesy producer Conner Halley) and I hope you can tune in using whatever listening device you prefer. Scheduled to appear:

  • Elliotte Friedman from HNIC. Elliotte’s 30 thoughts are a weekly stop for the nation, and his use on network television of terms like “Corsi” may cause a revolution.
  • Evan Daum from the EJ and Golden Bears hockey and football. We’ll talk about the Oil Kings series victory last night and the upstart Medicine Hat Tigers (that’s the next opponent for the OK).
  • Tom Lynn, player agent for Veritas hockey. Tom will discuss the DeKeyser signing and other college free agents who may be available, the Hobey Baker nominees and the upcoming draft.
  • Gene Principe from Rogers Sportsnet. We’ll talk about the trade deadline and the life of a broadcaster who spends so much time with the team on a day when one or more may be sent away. I’m hoping for a pun or two, but won’t push it.
  • Kirk Luedeke from Redline Report. We’ll talk Iginla to Boston and what happened, we’ll talk draft and I’ll ask about new Oiler prospect Kale Kessy–Kirk had some great info on him before the 2011 draft.
  • Rob Soria from Oil Drop. I’ll ask Rob about the deadline and what the Oilers should do over the summer to take that “next step.”

Questions and comments welcome, I’ll tell you as I get closer to the show time the best way to reach me is twitter @Lowetide_

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349 Responses to "CANUCKS AT OILERS G34 (12-13) 30.3.13"

« Older Comments
  1. spoiler says:

    I don’t know who the new play-by-play guy is, but we’re keepin him.

  2. bookje says:

    Woodguy: Stop that.

    Be patient with Tambellini.

    Do not purposefully point out a player he signed for 3 years in the NHL and a player he signed just last summer and played 4 NHL games in that contract are making the AHL affiliate better by not being in the line up.

    Rebuilds take time.

    Finally, he gets it.

  3. spoiler says:

    4th v 4th. That’s easier on the nerves.

  4. Suntory Hanzo says:

    To quote ‘Stand By Me’: Chopper sick balls.

    And by Chopper, I mean Brown, and by balls, I mean Bieksa.

  5. icecastles says:

    Please gawd just don’t try to play “shut-down hockey” for the next 42 minutes.

  6. fuzzy muppet says:

    Where’s Captain Happy?? Haven’t heard him rail on how Paajarvi is terrible in a while.

    91 is a keeper

  7. Woodguy says:

    hunter1909:
    Tonight is payback. For all those fucking Bertuzzi and Naslund goals.

    Great point.

    Dys.

  8. wordbird says:

    Only thing missing is a Canuck jersey change, something in a Flying-V style.

  9. fuzzy muppet says:

    Shit, Hall is dinged.

  10. Suntory Hanzo says:

    Keep the head’s up boys. You know they are going to go all Bruins on us.

  11. hunter1909 says:

    Now Oilers need to goon it up, to show the Nucks their new reality. Otherwise, the cheap shotting divers might start going to work.

  12. squeezboks says:

    Brown needs to goon Bieksa right out the gate in the second.

  13. fuzzy muppet says:

    It’s time for 13 to run Bieksa.

  14. cabbiesmacker says:

    Looks like Bieksa has free reign to do as he pleases to Hall.

  15. hunter1909 says:

    if it was European soccer, they’d take Hall out of the game now.

  16. rich says:

    Time for someone to hit that douche bag Bieksa.

  17. Woodguy says:

    Someone needs to break Bieksa’s teeth.

  18. hunter1909 says:

    Bieska’s taking the “If they’re going to whip us, they’re going to pay” approach.

  19. cabbiesmacker says:

    Call up KK? Too soon?

    KKK……Kill KK….KILL

  20. bookje says:

    Woodguy:
    Someone needs to break Bieksa’s teeth.

    Don Cherry’s too.

  21. sliderule says:

    Do you think our tough guy Brown is going to take on Bieksa.

    If they don’t take him on we won’t have any players for Flames

  22. Lowetide says:

    Once this game is in the books–and it kind of is but remember the Oilers are young–I would like one of the Oilers to pound Bieksa until he’s wearing his ass for a hat.

  23. BlacqueJacque says:

    fuzzy muppet:
    It’s time for 13 to run Bieksa.

    Heh, you guys are pretty much quoting Cherry before he even had a chance to say it.

  24. bones says:

    Potter should skate on Bieksa’s stupid face

  25. Bryan says:

    If Brown doesn’t go after Bieksa then I am not sure of the purpose for having him

  26. Woodguy says:

    FPB94:
    Derek,

    Eat the 4M$ this year (actually you don’t because you just traded Whitney)

    Then next year pump and dump him at the deadline.

    A can’tskate anymore Hal Gill was traded for a 2nd round last year.

    Any sentient being called a defenseman sees his value skyrocket at the deadline. That’s what smart GM’s do.

    Murray loses to Gill in a footrace and effectiveness and he got 2 2nds.

    Market it higher this year than last year.

    Every GM hates Shero right now for setting the market high on a meh Dman.

    I’d sell every marginal I have, you’ll never get more.

  27. asiaoil says:

    Changed my mind about JayBo – i want a nasty bastard who responds to that of crap Bieksa pulled at the end of the period by crushing a sister – who’s the nastiest top pair dman available? I want that guy.

  28. spoiler says:

    This keeps up, Dee Ess Eff is gonna have to change personalities names again.

  29. cabbiesmacker says:

    How nice would it be to see Brown, David with the lawnmower going on Bieksa’s forehead? A nice Jim Kyte encore presentation.

    Those were the days

  30. Wolfpack says:

    Brown has to find a way to lay a couple of huge hits on Canuck forwards, then skate by the Canucks bench, flash Bieksa a toothless grin and say “There’s a lot more where that came from”.

  31. striatic says:

    why would Bieksa accept a fight with Brown?

  32. hunter1909 says:

    It would be hilarious if that Rieder trade was announced right now.

  33. geeker99 says:

    I would almost put Brown on Hall line. The ol semenko treatment! I hate Beiska but sure would like him on our team?

  34. spoiler says:

    I don’t think you go after Bieksa. I think you go all Chicago on the Sisters and post a little memo for to all the games in the future.

    Brown sittin for 10.

  35. striatic says:

    geeker99: I would almost put Brown on Hall line. The ol semenko treatment! I hate Beiska but sure would like him on our team?

    if you’re on Vancouver, isn’t that exactly what you’d want the oilers to do right now to help you get back into the game?

  36. jp says:

    cabbiesmacker:
    Call up KK? Too soon?

    KKK……Kill KK….KILL

    I was thinking the same thing.

    Bryan:
    If Brown doesn’t go after Bieksa then I am not sure of the purpose for having him

    Something has to be done for sure.

  37. spoiler says:

    Hall, thankfully, takes the 1st shift.

  38. cabbiesmacker says:

    striatic:
    why would Bieksa accept a fight with Brown?

    Why should he get a choice?

  39. Woodguy says:

    Two posts for Paajarvi.

    Send him to the AHL.

  40. icecastles says:

    Bryan:
    If Brown doesn’t go after Bieksa then I am not sure of the purpose for having him

    Bieksa is a tough guy – he expects it and (more or less) can take it. If you want to send a message, don’t hurt the enforcer. hurt their stars. You hurt Hall, we’ll hurt a Sedin. And we’ll do more to him than you did to us.

    For years Edmonton has pitted enforcer after enforcer and wondered why it makes no difference. The Bieksas and Clutterbucks of the world aren’t hated because the hit the Oilers’ MacIntyres and Stortinis.

  41. spoiler says:

    Hemsky with great puck support behind Petry there.

  42. Bryan says:

    Not sure if the Oil have anyone nasty enough to hurt a Sedin

  43. hunter1909 says:

    Bieska really knows how to play a heel.

  44. Suntory Hanzo says:

    I still remember watching sportsnight and hearing Darren Dutessceuun(sp?) saying that Brown was “starting a lawnmower” on Kyte.

    That was my favorite Dutch quote.

    cabbiesmacker:
    How nice would it be to see Brown, David with the lawnmower going on Bieksa’s forehead? A nice Jim Kyte encore presentation.

    Those were the days

  45. hunter1909 says:

    Kreuger’s starting early tonight.

  46. Suntory Hanzo says:

    Nearly a Bad man.

    Noce coupla saves by Strombone1

  47. spoiler says:

    Goin for fanciest goal of the decade there.

  48. icecastles says:

    You can tell Smid’s feeling it… I count 4 attempted shots since his goal.

  49. spoiler says:

    It’s like there’s a beautiful thing every shift.

  50. spoiler says:

    I’ll admit it. i wanted Paajarvi to elbow Sedin there.

  51. hunter1909 says:

    Both of the announcers start the game as total Canuck homers, now they’re gushing about the Oilers lol.

  52. Doomoil says:

    Christ Jones is worthless.

  53. Lowetide says:

    There’s so much true talent on this team, it’s just incredible. All they’re missing is a second baseman with range and the ability to draw some walks, plus an arm or two in the bullpen.

  54. BlacqueJacque says:

    Hall has officially gone supernova. As of right now he’s 10th in points per game.

  55. icecastles says:

    Lowetide:
    There’s so much true talent on this team, it’s just incredible. All they’re missing is a second baseman with range and the ability to draw some walks, plus an arm or two in the bullpen.

    Our hockey team is pretty good too.

  56. spoiler says:

    Who are these guys?

    #Smartplayseverywhere

  57. hunter1909 says:

    Yakupov rushing end to end, twice ha ha.

  58. Suntory Hanzo says:

    A few notes:

    1) I love that Eberle uses his leg Anderson style to shiled from the stick check on his lateral moves.

    2) With the first line doing it’s magic, Canuck fans get a taste of what the Sedons have been doing every game for the last 5 years

    3) It’s nice to live in a town where there is 25% Canuck fans, 50% fairweather Canuck fans and 25% prairie and Ontario people who cheer for ‘other’. I have enough Oiler shirts and jerseys that I wear one almost every day after work and meet hockey people that note how good The Oil will be in a few years. It’s nice when we get to see the potential

    4) Let them play our game, not play theirs

    5) I still miss living in Edmonton during times like these.

  59. fuzzy muppet says:

    Lowetide,

    Imagine if they’d replaced Jones w Jokinen and then Potter/Whitney with Brett Clark(who got rave reviews from Yeo in tonight’s Wild game)

  60. icecastles says:

    Nice of them to give Brown and extra 10 minutes to put on the foil.

  61. Ice Sage says:

    This is a big step for this team. Lets see if they can keep their boots on Vcr throats… at least there’s a bit more reserve than those SJS, Det games.

  62. sliderule says:

    If the oil still have big lead with five minutes left they have got to send a message to Bieksa.

    He won’t fight but you can give him a two hander to his Achilles that will make him think twice next time.

    Right now he is skating around like the big dog.

    Let’s see if RK can figure it out

  63. hunter1909 says:

    sliderule: Right now he is skating around like the big dog

    He is the big dog. If he was an Oiler, we’d mostly all think he was a great player.

    If Taylor Hall ever makes it to the pinnacle of hockey, Bieska’s exactly the type he’s going to have to learn how to beat.

    I think I like Bieska; he’s always smiling and joking around in a seriously nasty way. It’s an appealing kind of character.

  64. squeezboks says:

    icecastles

    I agree but I wouldn’t want the Brown line on at the same time as the Sedins. So how do you make that happen?

    Fight Bieksa and take him off the ice for 5 min at least.

    I dunno, that functional toughness is sounding more and more attractive.

  65. striatic says:

    can someone tell me if we want PHX to win tonight or not?

  66. hunter1909 says:

    striatic: can someone tell me if we want PHX to win tonight or not?

    We want the Oilers to win. We therefore want all of the other teams to lose, all the time.

    At the end of the day, no one knows which teams are going to make it yet. Too much time for a 6 game losing/winning streak, which has been a major function of this shortened 48er season.

    PS: And the Flames we always always want to lose double every time.

  67. cabbiesmacker says:

    hunter1909:
    I think I like Bieska; he’s always smiling and joking around in a seriously nasty way. It’s an appealing kind of character.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajjX9_QtSAk

  68. FPB94 says:

    Man does that panel blow.

    What a headscratcher to give a good d-man a 2 year deal cause he’s playing well and realized your team isn’t complete garbage.

  69. striatic says:

    hunter1909: We want the Oilers to win. We therefore want all of the other teams to lose, all the time.

    we want both San Jose and Phoenix to lose to each other then.

    check.

  70. sliderule says:

    Hunter even big dogs don’t like to be hurt.

    They like to hand it out and if you don’t respond they will keep it up.

    I have dealt with bullies and I can tell you that you can make them cry.

  71. icecastles says:

    squeezboks: I agree but I wouldn’t want the Brown line on at the same time as the Sedins. So how do you make that happen?

    Good point. But I have an easy solution.

    Yank him right off the bench. Or jump into the bench and just start stomping on thighs. Sorry. I’m not an angry person… but I REALLY hate the Canucks. I’ve been shot, stabbed, and had my skull fractured in a fight (all separate occasions. I hate the Canucks more than all those people. I hate the Canucks more than I hate my ex-wife.

  72. steveb12344 says:

    striatic: can someone tell me if we want PHX to win tonight or not?

    I would say yes.

    It is probably more likely for SJ to finish strong, then Phx. So the SJ loss would probably be more valuable than the Phx win hurts us.

  73. spoiler says:

    striatic:
    can someone tell me if we want PHX to win tonight or not?

    Arrgh, Phoenix, but it’s pretty close to a wash.

  74. dangilitis says:

    I have never seen a player score a hat trick and then had the coach staple his ass to the bench for most of the next period. I don’t understand RK, I really don’t. If he’s trying to protect him, that’s the coward’s way out. You have a 4 goal lead and top 10 PK team in the league. If Bieksa hacks, you punch back and punch with authority and elbow him and cross-check him into Luongo. And best of all, you give Eberle the green light to do it. I’m 5’5″ and its actually quite easy from experience to sneak in and throw a sneak attack to catch the D off guard.

  75. hunter1909 says:

    Yaks, that was jaw dropping.

  76. commonfan14 says:

    So Ralph has set 10-5 as the number they need.

    I wonder what he has them pealing sections off of after victories.

  77. Suntory Hanzo says:

    1) Yakupov is getting more complete. He is and is going to be fun to watch.

    2) It will be important to keep Nail on the team so he can be the DD for the rest of the kids so we don’t have any Pat Kane incidents.

  78. hunter1909 says:

    Tonight there’s a future top UFA watching who’s putting a call to his agent “I want to be an Oiler”

  79. wordbird says:

    Speaking of supernova… can’t wait til Yak puts it all together.

    Some pretty brilliant flashes of skill thus far, from-a-different-planet skill.

  80. hunter1909 says:

    Suntory Hanzo: 2) It will be important to keep Nail on the team so he can be the DD for the rest of the kids

    Huh?

  81. wordbird says:

    Also, more Andi Petrillo. Time to put Grumpy Grandpa Healy out to pasture.

  82. hunter1909 says:

    Whitney’s playing mean tonight. Sign him.

  83. Ice Sage says:

    What a shift.
    Canuck era closing!

  84. Ice Sage says:

    hunter1909: Huh?

    Shout out to his muslim faith

  85. hunter1909 says:

    Flames and Nucks fans must really be enjoying the HNIC commentary tonight.

  86. icecastles says:

    hunter1909,

    I assume Suntori means “designated driver” not “Devan Dubnyk”. Maybe because Yak is Muslim so presumably doesn’t drink?

    As Kevin Weekes says, “it’s a head scratcher.” Though I suspect Weekes says that about thirty times a day, given the depth of insight he typically shows.

  87. hunter1909 says:

    Ice Sage,

    Yaks does his talking on the ice. :)

    But yes, Yaks appears like an absolute gem of a human being. Combined with his on ice example, he’s going to be a great Oiler.

  88. Woodguy says:

    spoiler:
    I don’t think you go after Bieksa. I think you go all Chicago on the Sisters and post a little memo for to all the games in the future.

    Brown sittin for 10.

    I think breaking Bieksa’s teeth has the most impact.

  89. striatic says:

    hunter1909:
    Whitney’s playing mean tonight. Sign him.

    he’s probably only doing that in an attempt to please Boston.

  90. spoiler says:

    That seemed like Van’s 2nd or 3rd scoring chance this game.

  91. Reg Dunlop says:

    Lots of complaining about Bieksa tonight. Someday canuck fans will have reason to complain when Hall does a light-speed fly by of douche Kevin removing his knee cap a’la Clusterfuck.

  92. icecastles says:

    Horcoff on pace for a 41-point season, prorated to 82 games. Small sample size that likely won’t continue, But interesting and nice to see.

    Comparatively, Smyth is on pace for 21 points, prorated to 82 games.

    (Hall and Gagner on pace for a million billion)

  93. Suntory Hanzo says:

    icecastles,

    Yes…I mean Designated Driver. I thought he was on record around draft time saying that he does not drink or smoke.

    Attempt at humour after living in Edmonton during the 80s and hearing stories about the lads.

  94. hunter1909 says:

    Evil Nucks dying to score that 1 goal to console themselves with.

  95. BlacqueJacque says:

    That’s the Sedins that the kids are dominating this period.

  96. BONVIE says:

    Refs need to make the odd slash and hook call on the Canucks there is an infraction every time one of the Oilers skilled forwards carry the puck.

  97. commonfan14 says:

    Why couldn’t DeKeyser have waited a day?

  98. hunter1909 says:

    I’m cheering for Luongo – he hates the Canucks too.

  99. Ice Sage says:

    Nice of canucks skaters to showcase luongo. there’s my jonesie!

  100. FPB94 says:

    Ryan Jones’ approval rate gone up 25% in one second.

  101. Lowetide says:

    A broken Vancouver is a beautiful gift from the Easter bunny.

  102. spoiler says:

    This is the signature game of the season thus far. As complete a game as we have seen in years.

  103. Henry says:

    As great as Hall has been tonight, this is Petry’s game too. He has been a stud since getting Datsuked, but especially tonight.

  104. jp says:

    That was a hell of a game. Very nice!!

  105. spoiler says:

    I think I just shed a tear.

  106. Oilanderp says:

    Well, we shut out the Canucks. Crazy times. Next thing you know dudes will be rising from the dead n stuff!

  107. pboy says:

    That was fun. Fuck do I ever hate Kevin Bieksa. I wish he was an Oiler.

  108. spoiler says:

    This is not an adjective I get to use on the Oilers very often, so tonight when I can, I’m gonna do it:

    Masterful.

  109. FPB94 says:

    Taylor Hall’s been looking like the closest thing to Pavel Bure I’ve seen.

    Then again it’s a stretch but his speed is incredible.

  110. Clay says:

    I don’t often drink alone, but when Hall got his third goal, I hit the pause button and went and made a drink.

    2 ounces Vodka
    1 ounce Kaluha
    1 ounce of cream

    A White Russian

    Because Hall Abides.

  111. pboy says:

    I agree with all of the folks who wanted to see someone go after Bieksa. I also agree with the guys who wanted the Oil to take a run at one of the Sedin’s. Thats the most effective way to send a message. Get after the guy who’s messing with your star and then go after their best player to let them know you have the stomach for it.

  112. Lowetide says:

    Dennis King ‏@DKingBH 2m

    Final chance tally: 19-10; 1-3 ST

  113. Ice Sage says:

    Props to Oilers coaching staff for having the lads prepared to go – caught a cavalier Canucks team early and closed the door the best way: by continuing to press and support the puck.
    Playoffs or no this year, this team is starting to believe and will be great.

  114. Oilanderp says:

    Wow what a game had by Lander in OKC

  115. hunter1909 says:

    Ice Sage: Playoffs or no this year, this team is starting to believe and will be great.

    They’re only 1 point out of 8th place after tonight. 15 more games for these young maniacs? This is sport. Anything happens, and always does.

    The Easter Bunny might take all this away of course, and next week that playoff bus might return to a pumpkin. I doubt if Ralphie intends to let that happen.

  116. OilLeak says:

    Oilanderp:
    Wow what a game had by Lander in OKC

    6 Points? Geezus, hopefully Lander gets back on track now.

  117. HeavySig says:

    Who was that team in the Oiler uniforms tonight?

    I can’t remember the last time the Canucks looked so helpless against the Oilers. They weren’t just clinging to a surprising lead, they were slapping Vancouver silly.

    No desperate, hemmed in team flopping around trying to deflect shots and praying for crossbars and goalposts. Solid checking, puck clearing and transition to offense.

    How about that check by RNH on a wide open Sedin in front of the net near the end?

  118. OilLeak says:

    HeavySig:
    Who was that team in the Oiler uniforms tonight?

    I can’t remember the last time the Canucks looked so helpless against the Oilers.They weren’t just clinging to a surprising lead, they were slapping Vancouver silly.

    No desperate, hemmed in team flopping around trying to deflect shots and praying for crossbars and goalposts.Solid checking, puck clearing and transition to offense.

    How about that check by RNH on a wide open Sedin in front of the net near the end?

    Vancouver is missing a third of their top 9 forwards, their luck was bound to run out.

  119. Ice Sage says:

    OilLeak,

    Yeah, but that’s happened lots before (as recently as Kesler, Sedin at end of last year) and the Canucks have still slapped Oilers around. THis is a real changing of the guard. And we bear witness.

  120. asiaoil says:

    STL has 6 of next 7 on the road – they have a chance – but need to bury CAL in the next 2 and then get 3 of 6 points on the west coast.

  121. Clay says:

    I haven’t been reading the posts tonight – has Delta Sierra Foxtrot made an appearance tonight?

  122. striatic says:

    asiaoil: STL has 6 of next 7 on the road – they have a chance – but need to bury CAL in the next 2 and then get 3 of 6 points on the west coast.

    agreed.

    next game against the Flames will be huge. season defining.

    if they win it, they have a decent shot at the playoffs. lose, and they go on the road with a tough schedule and behind on points.

    when you are lower than 8th it is easy to call every game a “must win” but the fact is that the Oilers are going to lose some down the stretch. need to win against Calgary in order to afford some losses against the top 5.

  123. delooper says:

    I watched the game with a cute redhead. Couldn’t comment until now. Nice game, Hall. You look like you could have been a 1st overall draft pick.

    It’s nice too to see young Yakupov slowly tuning-in to the NHL game. He has a long way to go but it’s clear he’s got the tools. They’re just not calibrated to the NHL game yet.

  124. Lowetide says:

    Clay:
    I haven’t been reading the posts tonight – has Delta Sierra Foxtrot made an appearance tonight?

    Negatory, niner niner.

  125. striatic says:

    LT said “I projected the Oilers to be -7 over 48 games, they are -11 over 33 games.”

    pretty cool, Edmonton is -8 after tonight.

  126. Clay says:

    Lowetide: Negatory, niner niner.

    Huh. I thought he’d be by with a Kadri > Hall comment or some such. Maybe tomorrow then.

  127. bookje says:

    One of these days, Taylor Hall is going to score a bunch of points to put this scoring race to bed. Maybe tonight? He’s 4-8-12 in his last 9 games and is (as always) a chance machine.

    A. Lowetide (Circa 8:07 AM, March 30th, 2013)

    A Prophet has Revealed Himself.

    I am pretty sure this means the 3 for 1 trade and team balance is imminent.

  128. jp says:

    BlacqueJacque:
    That’s the Sedins that the kids are dominating this period.

    Not the first time we’ve seen it either, and I don’t suppose it will be the last. A pretty effective way to neutralize the Canucks.

    Suntory Hanzo:
    icecastles,

    Yes…I mean Designated Driver.I thought he was on record around draft time saying that he does not drink or smoke.

    Attempt at humour after living in Edmonton during the 80s and hearing stories about the lads.

    Yeah, I think I remember Yak quoted as not drinking/smoking. Even he’s not on record it’s a good bet since he’s Muslim.

  129. delooper says:

    bookje,

    To be an Oilers prophet one must come to see a Lennart Petrell natural-hat trick and live to see the day.

  130. FPB94 says:

    delooper,

    I’M not sure you understand how the game of hockey works.

  131. delooper says:

    jp,

    I know plenty of muslims from Tatarstan that drink. They don’t drink much but they’re not afraid to dabble. Many of the muslims there aren’t publically “muslim” in the sort of standard, orthodox sense that gets popularized by countries like Saudi Arabia. It’s okay to be Muslim and not even know the difference between Shia and Sunni, at least, in Tatarstan.

  132. delooper says:

    FPB94:
    I’M not sure you understand howthe game of hockey works.

    Hmm, that could explain some things.

  133. maudite says:

    First game attended in 6 years. That was fun. Should know better than to wear a brand new hat to a hockey game…didn’t even think about it.

    They still need to rip that techno sound system out of the damn building or finally figure out how to use it. The thing just kills crowd momentum.

    End of the game, Bieska stoled the shut out puck. Guy is a nasty dirt bag.

    Amazing how much more observant I was than when I used to go all the time. It’s really crazy how different and more interesting the game is when you have a way better understanding of the finer details of things rather than just being somewhat suckered into the narratives bottle fed to the majority. I was really shocked at how much more I was looking for and picked up over what I used to.

  134. delooper says:

    Amazing how much more observant I was than when I used to go all the time.It’s really crazy how different and more interesting the game is when you have a way better understanding of the finer details of things rather than just being somewhat suckered into the narratives bottle fed to the majority.I was really shocked at how much more I was looking for and picked up over what I used to.

    Like for example, do you notice how so many beautiful women have really ugly dates? What’s up with that?

  135. jp says:

    delooper:
    jp,

    I know plenty of muslims from Tatarstan that drink.They don’t drink much but they’re not afraid to dabble. Many of the muslims there aren’t publically “muslim” in the sort of standard, orthodox sense that gets popularized by countries like Saudi Arabia.It’s okay to be Muslim and not even know the difference between Shia and Sunni, at least, in Tatarstan.

    Cool, and interesting to know. As Suntory mentioned I think Yak’s clean living was mentioned in a post draft interview, which likely also mentioned his being Muslim. I probably assumed the two were related as they often are.

  136. striatic says:

    icecastles: I assume Suntori means “designated driver” not “Devan Dubnyk”.

    he’ll have to learn to drive first.

  137. jp says:

    maudite:

    End of the game, Bieska stoled the shut out puck.Guy is a nasty dirt bag.

    For real? That’s just stupid and childish.

    I couldn’t see for sure who it was, but I guess he is also the Canuck who wound up for (but didn’t fire) the 190 foot slapper as time ran down? This after 2 different Oilers laid off of their forechecks in the Canucks end in the last 10 seconds. I figured said player realized it would be idiotic to waste a shot in frustration at that point, but it sounds like he just thought of something much more juvenile to do with it.

    Sportsmanship http://www.jollybengali.net/theconfluence/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/sportsmanship_middle_finger.jpg

  138. FPB94 says:

    jp,

    Blasting the puck in the dying seconds is fairly standard. When you’re competitive you just try till the end and sometimes it’s hard to put things into perspective, and you just let it go before you finished that tought.

  139. jp says:

    FPB94:
    jp,

    Blasting the puck in the dying seconds is fairly standard. When you’re competitive you just try till the endand sometimes it’s hard to put things into perspective, and you just let it go before you finished that tought.

    This is true, but not usually when you’re down 4. The game’s been over for a while by the time the buzzer goes.

    In any case, most of my complaint was about the puck stealing foolishness.

  140. OilLeak says:

    Ice Sage:
    OilLeak,

    Yeah, but that’s happened lots before (as recently as Kesler, Sedin at end of last year) and the Canucks have still slapped Oilers around.THis is a real changing of the guard.And we bear witness.

    I hate to be negative after a win, but if the Oilers lose Horcoff, Gagner, and Paajarvi for the this game tonight, you think the Oilers even have a chance in this game? No, and that’s point I’m trying to make. Until Horcoff came back from injury, this team was lost and losing games in the worst way imaginable, they were a horrible team and as whole still are. On some nights the skill and talent of this team will be enough to overcome the rest of the roster’s shortcomings, but on most nights in won’t, not against good and healthy teams at least.

    A couple wins against some teams with some very glaring issues does not make the Oilers a contender for the playoffs. I will not buy into the false hope fans have after the Oilers string 2-3 wins and forget the problems the team has had for the whole season, those problems still exist and they haven’t gone away. Once the Oilers come back to earth again(and they will) and the hope of the play-offs snuffed out, fans will be calling for the heads of management once more. The glaring holes on the roster will be magnified once again and every one will realize that this team is still not very good and will not be until those issues are addressed.

    Seriously, I want to cheer for a play-off run for the Oilers, I’ve been a fan since I was a kid and would like to see this core group have some success. However, this team is not ready for that yet and I won’t fool myself into thinking so, it just causes more aggravation in the long run.

  141. Lucinius says:

    So… just watched the game on the PVR. My thoughts;

    1) Hall; wow. Great game. Also liked Krueger sitting him (and his line) a bit after up 4-0 to get other players ice time and to help protect Hall from a dirty, frustrated team.

    2) Gagner line; wow. Didn’t cash, but boy could they have. Had a great game. Paajarvi especially. Guy is slowly turning into something the Oilers have been in dire need of for awhile.

    3) Petry; good game. Game this good was a long time coming for the guy with all his struggles. Made a number of really great plays defensively.

    4) Smid; SCORED. GOT AN ASSIST. LADISLAV SMID GOT TWO POINTS AND ONE WAS A GOAL! Sorry for the caps, but… SMID SCORED! Had a great game defensively as well. One negative involves him, though; after the Oilers got Hall his hat trick they missed an opportunity to try and get Smid one. Imagine the horror for Canuck fans if that had happened!

    5) Dubnyk; stellar game, especially with the sheer number of bouncy pucks and deflections.

    6) Refs; failing grade. They missed a lot of Canuck penalties, but more importantly whenever things were getting chippy/dirty they refused to settle the game back down. Could have been costly.

    7) Not about the Oilers, but… LANDER! Wow. Great night. Need him to get his mojo back something fierce. If he can end up finding a way to translate some scoring to the NHL level we may have an in-house solution for 4th line center next season (and eventually 3rd as Horcoff fades?).

    But, ohmygod! SMID SCORED! And we shut the Canucks out!

    Also, Bieksa is a petty, vindictive prick.

  142. Lucinius says:

    Also, boy could this game have been 7-0 easily. Complete games like this are so.. fantastic for fans.

    Its a pity we’ll probably stink up the barn against Calgary.

  143. spoiler says:

    My Over/Under on LT’s video tomorrow is Donovan’s Catch the Wind.

  144. GordM says:

    FPB94:
    jp,

    Blasting the puck in the dying seconds is fairly standard. When you’re competitive you just try till the endand sometimes it’s hard to put things into perspective, and you just let it go before you finished that tought.

    I would normally agree…however, and I’m not sure if it showed on TV. Because the players on the ice backed off on the forecheck, by the time the clock got down to 1 second with Bieksa behind the net, they had turned and started skating back to Dubnyk. Had he shot that puck, he would have been shooting to the backs of the Oiler players.

    One could argue shame on them for not staying on the play/puck right til the buzzer…but I suspect ‘the code’ would be if the winning team holds off the forecheck, and the losing team returns the favour by standing behind the net that indicates end-of-game.

  145. DeadmanWaking says:

    I smell skunk. No nakenchoc dreams, but what a pleasant moon rise!

    Here’s what I’m digesting: Taylor Hall scores the GWG at 16 seconds of regulation time. So the Dys skated around in frustrated futility for a full 59 minutes and 44 seconds with a goal stuck in their craw they would sooner forget. And I missed the whole thing.

    Just 4 hours sleep after my 28-hour waking period, but I loitered happily in bed for another couple of hours and arose feeling surprisingly good. Back on The Boost already, not because I need it yet, but for fear I’ll overshoot at the other end. I’m probably a bit tired on the inside, but I’ve already numbed my sleep sirens so it should be an easy night.

    I’ve read that this drug can turn a person into a bit of a hyperactive maze rat. I noticed that yesterday. One always that there’s cheese at the end of whatever tunnel one is presently running down. It’s not a good drug for making course corrections on foolish errands. Big wheel keeps on turning, rolling rolling rolling on the river, no matter what course you set.

    I had an hour of clarity before the today’s Boost kicked in. Normally I write pretty much sequentially. I have half an idea of where I’m headed, I’m alert to how the cookie crumbles as I go along, I can usually improvise myself out of a jam without having to backtrack, and even when I bumble rather far afield after improvisation arrives in a gale of gusts I somehow manage to circle back to at least one of my initial themes to strike a final chord.

    That was not how it went on my afternoon post in this thread. Every new idea seemed to immediately dislodge something I had written earlier. Big wheel kept on turning, rolling rolling rolling, but never the gravel was flat.

    [Kicking in now. Gosh is this stuff a clean buzz.] What I failed to notice during my time in the trenches is that I wasn’t doing what I thought I was doing. I wasn’t constructing narrative, I was breaking language. Breaking language is hard work.

    Attack of the Copula Spiders by Douglas Glover had taken root in my psyche, and my subconscious ants were pulling my strings. What works so well for me with this book is that everything in it rubs me the wrong way, in a good way. People must be familiar with the old truism that the most effective mode of persuasion is to convince the other party that it was his/her/their idea in the first place. Glover suckers me into this in almost every chapter. He frames a very interesting question, but then always adds some commentary that I find completely lame. Voila! His idea has now become my idea. Just as soon as I knock off that lame bit and inscribe my own initials, transfer completed.

    The first example of this is the discussion of “image patterning” halfway into the first chapter How to Write a Novel. As a reader, I’ve never had much use for image patterning. Especially when I was younger, I used to roll my eyes and huff at my loose bangs about all the wasted space devoted to profound images ultimately signifying nothing. In truth, I explicitly regarded it with all the contempt and suspicion of the Horoscope confidence trick: mush a lot of woolly, loaded images into a small koan, and then sit back and wait for your sucker to sew their own life thread through the porass-morass. However did you know so much about me?! I grew up with the Good Book so I know how it’s done: interleave fish, bread, apple, water, wine, salt, heart, egg, blood, seed, breath, and beasts of burden with every manner of human virtue or vice.

    Christian Symbolism A to H
    Christian Symbolism T to Z

    Wow, that’s quite the spread you have there. Homesteads were mighty, back in the day. Makes the Hudson’s Bay drainage basin look like a petty spittoon.

    When musicians riff, they are in essence just trading chords that are achingly familiar. But the patterns trigger memory, and the memories trigger patterns, and it all gains some kind of interesting new momentum, if the musicians manage to infuse fresh energy.

    Literature that gets top heavy with symbolic imagery is less of a narrative and more like one-half of an improvisation, where the reader is invited to provide the other half (ideally crediting the author for doing the lion’s share of the work–Aesop eat your heart out).

    Back in the seventies there was this horrible Chip Away toy that was advertised on television relentlessly and remorselessly.

    Toys of the Seventies:

    What you got with the Chip Away toy was a mallet, a chisel and a block of “stone” which was really wax molded around a solid, plastic “statue”. The conceit was you would use the little mallet and chisel to sculpt the statue. What you were really doing was knocking the wax off piece by piece until the plastic model underneath was revealed. [edited]

    One way to sculpt is to “just chip away the stone that doesn’t look like David” or so said Michelangelo. The other is to chip away at a freshly-caked mud crust in the Piltdown gravel pit to expose an ape’s tooth. Finders keepers. Extraction is nine tenths of personal ownership. If at first they won’t believe your hoax, make them earn it by the sweat of their own brow.

    Part of the problem here is reflected in my own comments about Glover. His book rubs me the wrong way precisely because he’s avoided descending into woolliness. I can’t just pretend he’s saying what I already think. An easier path to praise is speak in such vague terms that everyone assembled nods in unison, yet each individual nod affirms an entirely different meaning. At the other end of the spectrum, one can speak within such stridently rigid dictates that the recipient embraces whole cloth with an empty mind, suffocates or collapses under the burden of piece-meal opposition, or rejects the whole enchilada outright with entrenched contempt never to think again.

    The art is to leave a space for the reader without ascending by the wrists into anorexic vacuity or descending by the ankles into otiose, over-burdened symbolism. The grandiose try to have it both ways, which can only be accomplished under a claustrophobic sky.

    I’m a bit of a weird fish, because having first consciously registered my surface objections, my ants went directly to work exploiting the offered perspective. Maybe I have to chew before I can spit.

    Glover reinforces himself throughout this book (the need for a constant refrain is a constant refrain–never let it be said he doesn’t heed his own advice). Consciously I track this idea back to its introduction in the first chapter, but without his method of vigorous revisitation perhaps it might have slipped away.

    I did employ a kind of image pattern: that of popping pills, which recurs three times. First, my own booster pills (presently augmenting my indefatigable prattling). Second, the anonymous psych-med mixed by the three teenagers into the hard-liquor highball. Third, the extasy offered by the loosey-goosey Mila Kunis character to the uptight Natalie Portman character. All three pill images were situated at a nexus of personal identity struggle. I’ve said before that I use my writing as an avenue into my past life. Both of the movies were dealing with a crisis of sexual identity set amid a much larger and more persistent crisis of youthful identity.

    That last remark just caused me to think. When I participated in a writing course on Fantasy and Science Fiction the instructor was highly fixated on generational conflict, never failing to wade ankle-deep into the Oedipal oasis or the orchard of the apple and serpent. Often this boils down to youth displacing the previous generation and power structure or being visited by the sins of their elders. I mainly rejected this view: he seems to have fallen in love with his symbol systems, count me out. Another way to frame this is that with any changing of the guard–and corresponding shift in power structure–there is also a corresponding shift in personal identity among the principles. Literature seems to me to be an extended study of these shifts in personal identity.

    Taylor Hall is now The Man. Rome wasn’t built in a day. Taylor has seen this coming, and it has progressed in fits and starts. He’s earning his leadership through perseverance. Not all of that occurs out there on the ice; there are internal changes as well, that we as fans mainly perceive through the lens of results delivered. Yakupov had a window seat to something special today that transpired in the first period. He looks out there and he sees Hall and Nugent and Eberle cutting a wide swath. No, that’s not what he sees. He sees himself as a shadow in all that they do, knowing full well he’s cut from a similar cloth and his own time will come. He sees the open road and knows it is his for the taking. The question is “when” not “if”, knock on wood. He must feel pressed into a box. It’s a tough league. He’s going to have to break through the box with main force, which maybe he’s never had to do at easier levels. Then he sees Hall out there with just a few seasons under his battered body armor not just splintering the box, but blowing it to Kingdom Come.

    It’s a universal story because identity is rarely ever a finished project. Sex. Marriage. Mortgage. Children. Affairs. Divorce. Tuition. Remarriage. Menopause. Empty nest. Downsizing. Grand-children. Retirement. Infirmity. Taking leave. I feel tired already.

    The other aspect of novels is that they serve to accelerate. The river of life sometimes shifts the silt over long, imperceptible sweeps of time. It becomes hard to bring any clarity to one’s perceptions of this. Today’s river right in front of your eyes must contrast against a memory of the river, already eroded by the Big Wheel rolling rolling rolling of memories revisited; and contrast further against still older memories so often revisited that only the visiting itself remains.

    Novels compress time into the purview of a uniform lens. Four generations of family conflict are compressed into a four-hour read. What stays, what goes? Well, the conflict mainly stays: sharpened, polarized, squeezed, exaggerated. Or conversely, the stories told are precisely those with the most extreme hardship, adventure, heartache, and drama. Who tells stories about comfortable Hobbits, unless the story is about the disruption of comfortable Hobbits? The whole enterprise of literature functions as a distorted vital statistics feed.

    The main beneficiary of DVSF is our narrative per-occupation with power, generational conflicts, power dynamics, and shifts of power. Condensed milk by its very nature is mostly sugar. Sometimes in fighting over the cream, we leave out the water.

    Literature has one other function which I sat down to address before going off on a long tangent about the nature of the lens itself. This function is to make language by breaking language.

    In our own lives, we sometimes get hardened into our personal ruts. Sometimes we need a shake to break free. Sometimes it also happens that patterns of thought, social structures, and the habitual language of social structures becomes too incestuous and mutually interlocked. Sometimes language itself needs to break free. How does one give language a shake? That ends up being the job of literature, not because it does it well, but because hardly anything else does it at all.

    It’s probably not obvious, but that post I wrote on this thread (which seems to be a week ago already) was breaking some bones. Certain of my habits of discourse and posture and footwork to carry the load were tied to the wheel and bludgeoned senseless.

    Here I’m going to quote from the opening pages of Glover’s chapter The Drama of Grammar.

    The first problem of style is how to make dead things come alive. By dead things, I mean words, which neither move, nor breath, nor weep, nor lust, nor love. Writing well means raising the dead. It means making dead words dance. … I have waxed belligerent on the minimal requirement of grammatical clarity … now I’ll talk about the use of contrast and antithesis … to create drama at the level of sentences and paragraphs.

    The beauty [is to create] drama out of a grammatical occasion, and by “drama” here I mean not character action, that is, our present-day version of the ritualistic “things done” which is the original meaning of the original Greek term, but mental drama, the clash of ideas, motives, expectations, and outcomes. It is the mental drama, the element and surprise and mystery implicit in the plot of every sentence we write, that contributes to the feeling that a piece of prose is alive, and further contributes to that density of action, interest and delight which we expect from good writing.

    Bruce’s writing has this quality, and I’m guessing it always has, which is not to say it has come without work. It’s more than just his eyes, which I’ve commented on before. It’s also that his eyes and his clarity of recollection are situated in such close proximity. There’s not really a good word in English for this special quality I’ve sometimes noticed in people. I tend to refer to it vaguely as a capacity to be fully “situated”, meaning that present circumstance (and new information) filters into the long view with great immediacy and vigour. Memory must be dense, but at the same time the corridors must be open and passable; the eyes must be open, the vista accessible to gaze, and there needs to be a stiff internal breeze of interchange between perception and memory; many windows must be open, it can’t all be funneled through a master drawbridge and portcullis (which mainly serves to impound contraband in the type of person who thus structures their mind–props to the MPAA).

    It seems a simple thing. In some ways, it’s almost too simple to notice. And I certainly spent years, bumbling creature that I am, trying to figure out how to write interesting sentences before stumbling onto the obvious. I studied grammar texts, composition manuals, and encyclopedias of rhetoric. I tried to write these topic sentences they teach you in high school. I composed balanced sentences and periodic sentences and practiced, till I was blue in the face, the English department adage: Vary your sentence structure. Amazingly enough, having a mix of long and short sentences, along with a topic-body-conclusion paragraph structure, did not automatically make my prose interesting. Rather, the trend was in the opposite direction.

    The rest of the chapter is devoted to expounding his method of “but-constructions” to inject small conflicts into every phrase, sentence, and paragraph. I quoted those passages first of all because they struck a chord with me, and secondly, because I was inwardly horrified all the same. Good god man–I’m thinking to myself–if he swallowed his instruction whole with such deadly earnestness, it’s amazing he ever learned to write in the first place. Teachers–those with any degree of order to their teaching process–are mainly experts in mending broken things. Broken things in the educational setting are mainly dull broken things. What student pours our his or her inspiration when losing the battle with unfamiliar tools? The student who can pull this off didn’t really need a saddle and all those educational straps and stirrups in the first place. That same student would perform just as well riding bareback.

    Here’s a quote I set aside from Murakami’s book on Running:

    I hired a few swimming coaches to help me improve my form, but none of them were what I was looking for. Lots of people know how to swim, but those who can efficiently teach how to swim are few and far between. That’s the feeling I get. It’s difficult to teach how to write novels (at least I know I couldn’t) but teaching swimming is just as hard. And this isn’t just confined to swimming and novels. Of course there are teachers who can teach a set subject, in a set order, using predetermined phrases, but there aren’t many who can adjust their teaching to the abilities and tendencies of their pupils and explain things in their own individual way. Maybe hardly any at all.

    I make a joke about David Allen in his book Getting Things Done referring to our lizard brain as “kind of stupid” in not having the wits to remind of things only in those situations where we’re able to act. My joke was “Did this man skip puberty altogether?” Puberty–as I experienced it–was a nearly interminable chatter of stereotypical teenage male obsessions burbling up from the lizard brain to make swash-buckling leading-man advances in social circumstances I had not yet divined how to instigate.

    Here we have Glover–as he reports his younger self–taking the sanitization of the mind’s inner dialogue as situation normal. Good grief. The mind is messy like the womb, not pink and perfect like a newly baptized newborn. When one does get pick and perfect prose, the devoted writer has surely emptied cartloads of dirtied diapers to achieve that transient grace. Glover started off his writing career writing Chip Away babies; babies that never soiled or squealed or spattered nasty peas. Wow, just wow.

    For an ambitious writer, the point arrives where conflict enters the writing process itself. You’ve acquired some effective habits of form or style. You’ve transacted those aspects of your identity-struggle that were thrusting up tectonic plates into your messy sex-life as these habits of form and style evolved. That business is done now. What you have left to say no longer fits inside those old, comfortable shoes. Those old shoes begin to pinch. One begins to gnaw at the old shoes like a hyperactive abandoned puppy.

    Back to Murakami for what I increasingly read as a subtle metaphor:

    What’s special about this woman’s teaching style is that she doesn’t teach you the textbook form at the beginning. Take body rotation, for instance. To get her pupil to lean the correct way, she starts out by teaching how to swim without any rotation. In other words people who are self-taught in the crawl have a tendency to be overconscious of rotation. Because of this, there’s too much resistance in the water and their speed goes down–plus, they waste energy. So in the beginning, she teach you to swim like a flat board without any body rotation– in other words, completely the opposite of what the textbook says. Needless to say, when I swam that way I felt like an awful, awkward swimmer. As I practiced persistently, I could swim the way she told me to, in this awkward way, but I wasn’t convinced it was doing any good.

    And then, every so slowly, my coach started to add some rotation. Not emphasizing that we were practicing rotation, but just teaching a separate way of moving. The pupil has not idea what the real point of this sort of practice is. He merely does as he’s told, and keeps on moving that one part of his body. For example, if it’s how to turn you shoulders, you just repeat that endlessly. Sometimes you spend an entire session just turning you shoulders. You end up exhausted and spent, but later , in retrospect, you realize what it all was for. The parts fall into place, and you can see the whole picture and finally understand the role each individual part plays. The sun comes, the sky grows light, and the colours and shapes of the roofs of houses, which you could only glimpse vaguely before, come into focus.

    I was struggling so much with my earlier post because I was forcing myself to swim flat as a board. All the weight-bearing transitions in that piece go through superficially random incidents. For example, that the “ogooglebar” list of Swedish neologisms also contained the word “nakenchock” which I riff on for the rest of the post, partly in the guise of a movie critic, but more deeply by contrasting “nakenchock” (naked shock) with “nakenchoc” (naked chocolate), pressing into service ad hoc foreign-language antonyms differing by a silent, terminal letter, by which means I was attempting to express my inner ambivalence toward my newly adopted pharmaceutical intervention. Is this new me–my New 100%–is this nakenchock or nakenchoc? I was trying to stack this on top of the adolescent angst and ambivalence about sexuality and body image.

    The point isn’t that this device worked. The point is that my toe struck the marble floor where a thousand traversals before my heel struck the marble first. I suspect on the inside Yakupov is a very busy man learning to skate on whole new limbs.

    Well, that wore off the first Boost and all the dark hours most effectively.

  146. Ducey says:

    spoiler:
    My Over/Under on LT’s video tomorrow is Donovan’s Catch the Wind.

    I’ll take the, uh, over…?

  147. JAG-041 says:

    I would just like to point out here that LT said

    One of these days, Taylor Hall is going to score a bunch of points to put this scoring race to bed. Maybe tonight?

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