FAST TRAIN FOR MOROZ, CHASE, NURSE

The Edmonton Oilers have some very nice things happening in the three major Canadian junior leagues, and three of their prospects will be on display tonight at Rexall. Mitchell Moroz (Oil Kings), Ben Betker (Everett) and Jujhar Khaira (photo, by Lisa McRitchie, also Everett) represent some of the many teenagers across the country making their way through the system.

CHL SCORING

  1. L Mitchell Moroz (WHL) 7, 7-3-10
  2. C Greg Chase (WHL) 6, 7-2-9
  3. C Kyle Platzer (OHL) 6, 4-2-6
  4. D Darnell Nurse (OHL) 5, 1-4-5
  5. C Jujhar Khaira (WHL) 5, 2-2-4
  6. R Jackson Houck (WHL) 7, 2-0-2
  7. D Ben Betker (WHL) 6, 0-0-0
  8. C Marco Roy (QMJHL) Injured

Moroz and Khaira are 2011 draft picks, all others from this summer. This is all pretty much good news, Moroz is playing with skill every game and the numbers have been impressive so far; we’ve been talking about him for so long it seems like years but this is only his second season as an Oiler prospect (and his final junior year). He should clear 25 goals and would certainly be on track for a pro career, but he is not yet signed.

The most impressive numbers on the list (among forwards) are from 2013 draftee Greg Chase. He’s on pace for a 90 point plus season and has emerged as a quality player in all areas–even those who are in his corner have to be surprised by the offense (although we discussed this during the summer and a bump was predictable). Darnell Nurse leads the way for the blue, clocking in at a point per game courtesy increased powerplay time (which is also impacting Chase’s numbers).

Kyle Platzer is worth a mention too, and Khaira is doing well not great but it’s much too early to be pressing. One area of concern is Marco Roy, who had a strong pre-season, a good Penticton camp but has disappeared from radar since. We await word assuming injury, but there has been no news from Quebec province.

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46 Responses to "FAST TRAIN FOR MOROZ, CHASE, NURSE"

  1. BlacqueJacque says:

    Too bad about Marco. Happy to see Moroz developing, maybe he’s one of those late-blooming power forward types. You know, the kind the Devils trade to us just as he’s finally started scoring? Not often anyone comes out even in a trade against Lou.

    Of course, odds are the Oilers will trade him the year before he figures it out.

  2. Racki says:

    I know people don’t put a lot of stock in an “enforcer”, but I tend to. The fact is, Moroz can keep up to a play, and is currently showing he can play in all situations and have good success. He’s a feared fighter too, which makes him, at worst, a “Gazdic” type (but I don’t at all see him being just that). I don’t foresee him ever being a Milan Lucic (wishful thinking), but if he can be a bottom six guy that chips in the odd offense while bringing a very physical game, I think I’m happy with this pick.

    I know too that a lot of people dislike this reach (early 2nd round, whereas most lists had him .. 3rd round ish?), and it’s hard not to think that the Oilers are doing everything in their power to push Laxdal into playing Moroz as much as he can (I’m not entirely sure this is all his doing). However, I love Moroz’s game… he’s an edgy player, physical, and puts up decent numbers. So while he may not be Lucic, perhaps he’s a Torres that can fight a heck of a lot better, and minus the off-ice issues Torres has.

    I’m an avid Oil Kings follower/watcher… while Moroz isn’t highly skilled player, I think he brings an element the Oilers severely lack right now.. toughness/size with usable skill. The skill isn’t top end, but it will definitely work given his best assets (straight line speed, physicality, ability to be used in all situations).

  3. Bruce McCurdy says:

    Laxdal has shown no tendency to play his guys in any different place than where they can best help his team. In this case, Moroz is his 1 LW with a bullet. The obvious choice to play with Samuelsson and Lazar. Guys like Dylan Wruck, T.J. Foster and Stephane Legault have all moved on, and Moroz is legitimately next in line. He’s waited his turn and has gotten nothing “given” to him.

  4. hunter1909 says:

    Wtf is stopping Mact from signing Moroz now?

    Does he prefer not to bother, and Moroz’s agent talks up the 2014 draft?

  5. Fixall with Rexall says:

    I almost wasnt cheering for Moroz last year out of pure spite. I hated the pick so much I was beginning to question Stu and wether he was an upgrade on KP. Now? Go get em Mitch! What the hell do I know.

    I hope his fighting decreases this year though. I’m always worried those young kids who scrap a lot and play big minutes are putting too many miles on their odometer at such a young age. Don’t get injured son.

  6. thejonrmcleod says:

    I was hoping to see Roy play this Friday in Halifax. Looks like that won’t happen. Disappointing.

  7. nelson88 says:

    It has been awhile since I looked but seem to recall Moroz’s counting numbers, skill set (and draft pedigree) align pretty well with Ben Eager.

    I am not an Eager fan. He clearly has some skill in that he can skate, has a good shot and a reasonable amount of hockey sense. With those skills and size I have always thought it a pretty good “tell” that he is on his 6th (?) organization at 29 years old. I think it is fair to say he has not made the most of his talent. Perhaps it is due to injury but that is rarely the entire story. I view Eager as the “worst case” scenario.

    Moroz has plenty of tools and the added benefits of being in an organization that is desperate for his “projectable” ceiling and a bushel of skilled players to feed him the puck. If his head is screwed on properly he will go far.

  8. Romulus Apotheosis says:
  9. cabbiesmacker says:

    Nice to be seeing good things from the Moroz and Khaira types. Wouldn’t it be a welcome luxury to see some of these kinds of kids along with a Pitlick start bumping the existing 4th liners off the roster?

    A little toughness. A little scoring. All from within ones own system. Nice. If Kessy could start finding the net in OK as well it might signal an end of the coke machine draft days.

  10. cabbiesmacker says:

    Romulus Apotheosis:
    Looks like Magnus is HSed again:

    http://www.nhl.com/gamecenter/en/boxscore?id=2013020045

    No big surprises there

  11. BlacqueJacque says:

    Monahan scored. 4 points in 3 and a third games so far.

  12. Lowetide says:

    BlacqueJacque:
    Monahan scored.4 points in 3 and a third games so far.

    They should keep him up. he’s proven he can play at this level imo. And for those wondering, I said the same thing about Gagner. If he’s ready, he’s ready. Looking back? I probably would have voted for one more year of junior, but remain convinced Gagner is a very good young NHL player.

  13. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    I gather Monahan’s age helps (he’s one of the oldest members of his draft class, no?).

    I guess the question, if we assume a player is ready to go (or near enough), defaults to a contract question: burn and ELC year? and a development question: can he still get something out of JR? i.e., more ice time, more situations, leadership stuff, etc.

    Not sure there is a right answer here.

  14. BlacqueJacque says:

    Lowetide,

    I wanted Monahan so bad for the team, he’d have made Gagner into a trading chip for at least a #2 type d-man – perhaps with the Rangers, enabling them to buy out Richards – but I knew the Flames weren’t going to pass him up. Big, skilled 1C had been an organizational need since Nieuwendyk. I mean, the Oilers had gone through some dry spells of their own, but not that bad. Last suited up for the Flames in the ’94-95 lockout-shortened season.

    Oh hey, Bart scored. Monahan with the only helper.

    Flames up 2-0, but outshot 19-9.

  15. Lowetide says:

    Chase with an assist so far tonight.

  16. BlacqueJacque says:

    I’m watching the game, holy shit this kid is something special. When he’s on the ice, you’re constantly hearing his name, and he’s outmuscled Rene Bourque, skated around some defender, jumped into d… it’s like watching a slower, slightly bigger Toews.

  17. Lowetide says:

    Betker with an assist.

  18. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    Looks like Muir got a suspension:

    USHL Hockey Ops
    ‏@USHLHockeyOps
    SUSPENSION: Aidan Muir (@indianaice) has been suspended for 1 game for Checking from Behind, which occurred on 10/4

    Also, I just realized Samu came over this year and is on Muir’s USHL team… weird.

  19. Dead Cat Bounce says:

    Anyone have any idea why the Coyotes sent Henrik Samuelsson back to junior?

    He’s just killing it in the WHL with 18 points in 9 games.

  20. RexLibris says:

    Monahan iooks like something special so far. I think the best thing for him would be to go back to junior, but with every passing game it seems more and more likely that the Flames will keep him up.

    I hope Eakins is keeping an eye on this Flames team for the first BoA this year. They are playing very well and surprising some teams. I sincerely hope we aren’t among them.

  21. fifthcartel says:

    Chase with 2 assists tonight. 11 points on the season, I think I really like that selection.

  22. Lowetide says:

    Another assist for Chase, now 7, 7-4-11

  23. RexLibris says:

    Lowetide:
    Another assist for Chase, now 7, 7-4-11

    Guess he read my post last night. Glad I could help. ;)

  24. RexLibris says:

    Flames win 3-2 and dominate the Habs in chances.

    Wonder what kind of Montreal team will show up tomorrow evening.

  25. RexLibris says:

    Yakimov had a rough night. Declining icetime 5+ in the 1st, 2:47 in the 2nd and 1:02 in the 3rd. No shots or faceoff attempts.

  26. Romulus Apotheosis says:

    Dead Cat Bounce:
    Anyone have any idea why the Coyotes sent Henrik Samuelsson back to junior?

    He’s just killing it in the WHL with 18 points in 9 games.

    Looks like they assigned him earlier than you’d expect for someone on the verge of making the team, but later than someone definitely not making the team (ie. before some AHLers, after others).

    Yotes… don’t exactly have a lot of info with the press releases:

    http://coyotes.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=682934

    They probably just want to push the kid to stew for another year. Can’t hurt, can it?

  27. supernova says:

    LT,

    Am I out to lunch on this?

    If a player gets picked early in Round 2, and a number of teams shortly after the pick also say they would have picked the player with their pick as well, how does this qualify as a Reach?

    If their is a whole market full of buyers willing to spend the price on that commodity then the commodity is priced appropriately. This is simple economics.

    I get that the appraised value was less than that but market is the real indicator.

  28. Lowetide says:

    Chase scores now, and enter’s the league’s top 10 in points.

  29. supernova says:

    Romulus Apotheosis: Looks like they assigned him earlier than you’d expect for someone on the verge of making the team, but later than someone definitely not making the team (ie. before some AHLers, after others).

    Yotes… don’t exactly have a lot of info with the press releases:

    http://coyotes.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=682934

    They probably just want to push the kid to stew for another year. Can’t hurt, can it?

    Romulus Apotheosis,

    I will search for it but I remember reading or hearing that assistant GM Treliving saying something about the organization being remorseful about past prospects being rushed to play against men, that they had decided on taken a very methodical approach with players and have them over ripen. Also commented that this had to do with the budget and not wanting to use EL years.

  30. RexLibris says:

    Lowetide:
    Chase scores now, and enter’s the league’s top 10 in points.

    I’m just going to keep ragging on him then, because apparently that works.

    Seriously, though, I loved that they were able to draft him and am very excited to see his development. He represents so much of what the Oilers need in their roster.

  31. Lowetide says:

    supernova:
    LT,

    Am I out to lunch on this?

    If a player gets picked early in Round 2, and a number of teams shortly after the pick also say they would have picked the player with their pick as well, how does this qualify as a Reach?

    If their is a whole market full of buyers willing to spend the price on that commodity then the commodity is priced appropriately. This is simple economics.

    I get that the appraised value was less than that but market is the real indicator.

    I think it goes like this:

    1. Moroz was rated late 2nd round (McKenzie had him #56)
    2. Oilers want him, suspect he won’t last to third round
    3. Oilers mull over trading down, but then decide he’s the player they want, and more importantly, need

    I have no quarrel with people beating up on the value, because it is in fact a reach. I do have an issue with some of the personal comments and open disgust thrown at the player. That I cannot endorse or be a part of, because he’s a teenager and he sure as hell didn’t put himself in this position.

  32. supernova says:

    Lowetide: I think it goes like this:

    1. Moroz was rated late 2nd round (McKenzie had him #56)
    2. Oilers want him, suspect he won’t last to third round
    3. Oilers mull over trading down, but then decide he’s the player they want, and more importantly, need

    I have no quarrel with people beating up on the value, because it is in fact a reach. I do have an issue with some of the personal comments and open disgust thrown at the player. That I cannot endorse or be a part of, because he’s a teenager and he sure as hell didn’t put himself in this position.

    Lowetide,

    I totally get what you are saying, I also agree that Mckenzie is the gold standard or the aggregate list is.

    My only issue with that is it takes out “market pressures and inside knowledge of how other organizations feel about picks”

    Well I would have preferred Moroz being picked with a 3 or a 7 (Chase). BM list doesn’t take into account another team calling the oilers and essentially saying we want your pick because we want Moroz.

    We do know these things happen, and there have been enough whispers ( somewhat similar to the Yakupov whispers) with the Moroz pick we can reasonably guess this was happening.

    The Mikhonov pick years ago had none of these whispers, it was just completely out of left field and way way above projected place.

    Anyhow

    The Oilers picked him and I don’t have blind faith but I am going to cheer like hell for him.

  33. Lowetide says:

    SN: I don’t think we should either, though. I don’t think we give the Oilers a break on that, because they left better value (consensus value) on the table. I don’t believe for a minute we need to give the Oilers any leeway, and we have a right to carve them if the pick doesn’t work out.

    I said it the day it was made, have no problem saying it now.

    http://lowetide.ca/blog/2012/06/harvest-moon-5.html

    Finally, a note on the scouting staff and Stu MacGregor. I don’t think their draft was a strong one, as they clearly went after “need” as opposed to “best player available.” Although the overall quality of the draft was not strong, the pick at #32 meant they were passing on too much talent by taking Moroz. The scouting staff better be right, or this pick will be remembered for a long time.

  34. supernova says:

    Lowetide:
    SN: I don’t think we should either, though. I don’t think we give the Oilers a break on that, because they left better value (consensus value) on the table. I don’t believe for a minute we need to give the Oilers any leeway, and we have a right to carve them if the pick doesn’t work out.

    I said it the day it was made, have no problem saying it now.

    http://lowetide.ca/blog/2012/06/harvest-moon-5.html

    Finally, a note on the scouting staff and Stu MacGregor. I don’t think their draft was a strong one, as they clearly went after “need” as opposed to “best player available.” Although the overall quality of the draft was not strong, the pick at #32 meant they were passing on too much talent by taking Moroz. The scouting staff better be right, or this pick will be remembered for a long time.

    Lowetide,

    I too believe in accountability. I do feel like that draft year and many moves were made out of panic from a now since removed GM.

    As we seen from that draft and then subsequent moves, the team craved toughness. Which I agree they needed. My preference would be to trade picks for NHL ready toughness / truculence then to draft for that “need”.

    For every pick that we send for a mike brown type we save years of waiting for Abney’s, Moroz’s, the Heskeths and the wash out rate on those picks is quite high. I personally was not a fan of the brown move on its own but rather a fan of the move when it meant we would save development time and draft picks going for that same type of player.

    As you have wrote their was a dramatic shift between these last two drafts In terms of style. While I much prefer what happen this year, it was far easier for MacT to go that way when he already had the Moroz, Pitlick, and Khaira, Kessy pieces in the system. There was no “need” to go for that type of player again.

    Maybe I get defensive for the player. I will defend Moroz, and players like him ferverently , also the Horcoff’s because it wasn’t their fault where they got picked or they were blessed enough to sign a bloated contract. I also will blast management at times.

    I probably give more grace at draft time because I see the draft as an auction or stock trading floor, and emotion and what other buyers are doing come into play.

    My areas of disgust are with the development and pro scouting side. I find them far below acceptable.

  35. Lowetide says:

    I’m cheering like hell for Moroz too, from everything I read and hear he’s a good teammate.

  36. jp says:

    Racki:
    I know people don’t put a lot of stock in an “enforcer”, but I tend to. The fact is, Moroz can keep up to a play, and is currently showing he can play in all situations and have good success. He’s a feared fighter too, which makes him, at worst, a “Gazdic” type (but I don’t at all see him being just that). I don’t foresee him ever being a Milan Lucic (wishful thinking), but if he can be a bottom six guy that chips in the odd offense while bringing a very physical game, I think I’m happy with this pick.

    I completely agree that’s a very valuable asset if that’s what he turns into (and I think there’s a decent chance). I like that he’s already successfully played the shutdown role too – he just needs to bring a bit of offense which he’s doing now in a small sample size. Having a guy who can fill the enforcer role but also the ability to play 3rd line (or at least fill in there) is a fairly big deal. Wouldn’t it be nice not to have Mike Brown on the roster? Maybe it even allows the team to run an Omark-Arcobello-Thoresen type 4th line. Who knows if he pans out, or if he was the best choice at #32, but he’s certainly a prospect of interest right now who could be a real useful player for the Oilers for a lot of years.

  37. DeadmanWaking says:

    In the CBA world, trades are hard. They are hard one at a time, and nearly impossible to overlap. Any significant trade shuffles your depth chart, impacts your cap obligations, impacts the chemistry of the room, and impacts the roles and performance on the ice. You can’t have GM 1A and GM 1B pursuing two different trades at the same time without talking to each other. Too many interacting ripple effects.

    Trades need to be viewed as a finite resource for coping with injury, friction, defection, unexpected weakness or strength, and imbalances in the procurement pipeline, such as one would expect to see under a rigid BPA draft regime. Insofar as a team has enough trade margin to balance out the roster, BPA is almost certainly the prudent rule of thumb.

    An established team with a long track record of development and success on the ice will typically maintain a positive trade margin. That’s the whole point of being a well-oiled management machine. The Oilers had a raft of bad contracts, lack of grit and size, and extreme disparity in the age structure (pups and pooped). Not well oiled.

    It’s easy to get causality the wrong way around here. Does BPA make you a good team? Or does being a good team make BPA the best play?

    Weingast on the Violence Trap says that first you have to resolve violence in society before you parachute in the institutions of democracy. The traditional presumption is that democratic institutions are the cure for violence.

    Today my chiropractor was telling me he went to a training program which puts managing pain first. In this view pain causes compensation, and bad compensation leads to chronic complaints. The traditional “proactive” view is that you address the source of the pain first, then hope the other dominoes fall. It can be argued both ways.

    One of the keys to Apple’s spectacular profits was corning a big chunk of the flash industry before introducing killer products stuffed with flash memory. Can a small company imitate that business model? To a certain degree, the Apple model works for Apple because Apple is Apple. Just as the Detroit model works for Detroit because Detroit is Detroit.

    Kasparov was famous for his relentless attack. Imagine he sits down in some chess game half finished and takes over one side. Does he attack? Maybe he plays a horribly passive continuation. Afterward, everyone is stunned. The great Kasparov turtled, how could it be? Then Kasparov retorts, “in that sucky position, you’ve got no choice but to make one lame move after another, and hope your opponent makes a mistake”. What makes him great is not getting into those sucky positions in the first place.

    This team definitely got itself into a sucky position. And perhaps that entails making a few sucky maneuvers to get back on the road. The reach for Moroz could be one of those things. It’s very hard to evaluate this kind of thing from an outside vantage point.

    Way back I sometimes played a card game of the President/Asshole variety. As the asshole, you’d get into this situation where your hand was being raped turn after turn on the mandatory pass-back, and you could never make quota. You get to the point where you take stupid risks in the turn play to dig yourself out of the gutter. Hell, you might get lucky. In the version we played, you could be the asshole for a long time, and no amount of skill would save you. Basically, you sat around waiting for pocket aces, or you swung for the fences with what you had available. Even at thin odds.

    Maybe having Moroz in your farm system instead of some zippy all-world hobbit allows your deputy coaches to draw up a game plan with a higher compete level, which is a better environment for your other prospects to learn the game as you want them to play it when called up for a cup of coffee. It’s not just whether he makes the final grade.

    None of my leadership books on making a substantial culture change subscribe to BPA. They all emphasize buy-in to the plan and devotion to the team concept. The gifted team member is often the hardest to change. They sit in their corner office going “works for me” while the organization as a whole flounders.

    A few screwy picks bear watching. It’s hardly a cause to screech “smartest-man-in-the-room” and immediately start chucking feces. Good management on the uptake hardly ever looks completely sane from the external vantage point. With no slack at all, accountability is just a code word for collectivist castration. It’s an ugly reflex.

  38. russ99 says:

    The questions about Moroz aren’t lessened by his good start.

    He’s 19 (May birthday) in his third full WHL season, he’s gonna push the river against primarily 17 and 18 year olds, especially on a good team where he’s not expected to be a primary scorer.

    The question is will the scoring stay when he’s 20 and playing older, tougher and better AHL players, and especially a few years later when playing the best in th NHL?

    I still think there were far better bets at his draft position.

  39. supernova says:

    DeadmanWaking:
    In the CBA world, trades are hard.They are hard one at a time, and nearly impossible to overlap.Any significant trade shuffles your depth chart, impacts your cap obligations, impacts the chemistry of the room, and impacts the roles and performance on the ice.You can’t have GM 1A and GM 1B pursuing two different trades at the same time without talking to each other.Too many interacting ripple effects.

    Trades need to be viewed as a finite resource for coping with injury, friction, defection, unexpected weakness or strength, and imbalances in the procurement pipeline, such as one would expect to see under a rigid BPA draft regime.Insofar as a team has enough trade margin to balance out the roster, BPA is almost certainly the prudent rule of thumb.

    An established team with a long track record of development and success on the ice will typically maintain a positive trade margin.That’s the whole point of being a well-oiled management machine.The Oilers had a raft of bad contracts, lack of grit and size, and extreme disparity in the age structure (pups and pooped).Not well oiled.

    This team definitely got itself into a sucky position.And perhaps that entails making a few sucky maneuvers to get back on the road. The reach for Moroz could be one of those things.It’s very hard to evaluate this kind of thing from an outside vantage point.

    Maybe having Moroz in your farm system instead of some zippy all-world hobbit allows your deputy coaches to draw up a game plan with a higher compete level, which is a better environment for your other prospects to learn the game as you want them to play it when called up for a cup of coffee.It’s not just whether he makes the final grade.

    None of my leadership books on making a substantial culture change subscribe to BPA.They all emphasize buy-in to the plan and devotion to the team concept. The gifted team member is often the hardest to change.They sit in their corner office going “works for me” while the organization as a whole flounders.

    A few screwy picks bear watching. It’s hardly a cause to screech “smartest-man-in-the-room” and immediately start chucking feces. Good management on the uptake hardly ever looks completely sane from the external vantage point.With no slack at all, accountability is just a code word for collectivist castration.It’s an ugly reflex.

    DeadmanWaking,

    You and I are on the same page, it seems on this.

    It is complete unfair and asinine to attack decision making on each move individually as well, as to not cut them some slack for the degree of difficulty to make trades and acquire a certain asset type.

  40. supernova says:

    russ99:
    The questions about Moroz aren’t lessened by his good start.

    He’s 19 (May birthday) in his third full WHL season, he’s gonna push the river against primarily 17 and 18 year olds, especially on a good team where he’s not expected to be a primary scorer.

    The question is will the scoring stay when he’s 20 and playing older, tougher and better AHL players, and especially a few years later when playing the best in th NHL?

    I still think there were far better bets at his draft position.

    russ99,

    Your question is right but the league is not primarily 17 year olds. The WHL tends to be a draft plus one average, even closing in on draft plus 2. The primary skill we look at is the draft year talent but many players are playing in the league and are effective even when not being drafted.

    Ex. Cody Corbett.

    Again while you are right he is on the uptick later than what is desired, he also has a greater role and playing time this year. Opportunity is a key.

  41. delooper says:

    Munro won the nobel literature prize. Kind of amazing. I mean, if any Canadian were to win it I’d give it to her. I’m not used to Canadians winning things, other than Stanley Cups. Still, I’m amazed.

  42. Ca$h-Money! says:

    delooper,

    Canadians living in the US for the bulk of the year, that is.

  43. Lowetide says:

    Good for Munro. My wife has read her stuff since forever, and suggests its a worthy honor (that’s the only frame of reference I have). For my money the best female Canadian writer is Joni Mitchell, but that’s a different form of art.

  44. TheGreatMutato says:

    delooper:

    On the CBC this morning they referred to it as the ‘Nobel Peace Prize in Literature’. I don’t know why people keep doing that…

  45. spoiler says:

    So let me get this straight…

    Moroz chases Nurses? On trains?

  46. spoiler says:

    Lowetide: SN: I don’t think we should either, though. I don’t think we give the Oilers a break on that, because they left better value (consensus value) on the table. I don’t believe for a minute we need to give the Oilers any leeway, and we have a right to carve them if the pick doesn’t work out. I said it the day it was made, have no problem saying it now. http://lowetide.ca/blog/2012/06/harvest-moon-5.htmlFinally, a note on the scouting staff and Stu MacGregor. I don’t think their draft was a strong one, as they clearly went after “need” as opposed to “best player available.” Although the overall quality of the draft was not strong, the pick at #32 meant they were passing on too much talent by taking Moroz. The scouting staff better be right, or this pick will be remembered for a long time.

    When we hold the output (the pick) accountable to a tighter variance than the inputs (rankings by the various scouts), we are engaging in very very very bad Math. The scouting reports on the second round projected prospects can disagree by as much as a round, sometimes even more, depending on the player. They do every year. Thus it is impossible, using any sort of Math, to call Moroz a reach pick.

    You can call him a reach pick by the arbitrary standard you guys created this summer. But that’s not Math. It is merely an arbitrary line in the sand.

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