I KNOW WHAT I LIKE (IN YOUR WARDROBE)

We’ve been focused this month on the NHL team, and with so many kids showing well that should mean Todd Nelson has plenty of young talent to develop during 2014-15. I predicted over the summer he would have Bogdan Yakimov for the entire season, but at this point that may not happen. Yakimov’s TC performance is moving him up the depth chart by the day.

PROJECTED LINES AND PAIRINGS

  • L1: Ryan Hamilton—Jason Williams—Andrew Miller
  • L2: Iiro Pakarinen—Bogdan Yakimov—Steve Pinizzotto
  • L3: Curtis Hamilton—Jujhar Khaira—Matt Ford
  • L4: Mitchell Moroz—Will Acton—Travis Ewanyk
  • D1: Brandon Davidson—Brad Hunt
  • D2: Martin Gernat—David Musil
  • D3: Jordan Oesterle—Dillon Simpson
  • G: Richard Bachman, Laurent Brossoit

This is my lineup for most of the season, although Klefbom likely starts in OKC (and maybe he slides in with Hunt until Davidson is healthy again). I’ve tweaked the lineups a little based on input from Jonathan Willis when we last ran this, but have kept the ‘reasonable expectations’ offense the same.

SCORING (RE) 2014-15

NAME GP G A PTS
R MATT FORD 66 26 26 52
C BOGDAN YAKIMOV-rookie 64 22 23 45
R ANDREW MILLER 65 14 30 44
D BRAD HUNT 57 7 33 40
C JASON WILLIAMS 60 15 21 36
L RYAN HAMILTON 56 15 17 32
L IIRO PAKARINEN-rookie 60 17 14 31
L MITCHELL MOROZ-rookie 70 15 15 30
L CURTIS HAMILTON 60 13 15 28
R STEVE PINIZZOTTO 57 11 17 28
D MARTIN GERNAT 64 5 20 25
C JUJHAR KHAIRA-rookie 57 7 16 23
C WILL ACTON 44 6 17 23
L JESSE JOENSUU 35 10 11 21
C TRAVIS EWANYK 61 6 10 16
R MITCH HOLMBERG-rookie 35 7 7 14
D BRANDON DAVIDSON 65 4 10 14
D DILLON SIMPSON-rookie 50 3 11 14
L KELLEN JONES-rookie 28 3 9 12
L JOSH WINQUIST-rookie 35 7 4 11
D C.J. LUDWIG-rookie 35 3 7 10
C CONNOR JONES-rookie 28 2 8 10
D DAVID MUSIL 70 1 9 10
D GRAEME CRAIG-rookie 40 2 6 8
D JORDAN OESTERLE-rookie 50 1 6 7
D OSCAR KLEFBOM 25 0 5 5
L KALE KESSY 30 2 2 4

The players to watch in OKC this season are plentiful. Klefbom, Yakimov, Khaira, Gernat, Moroz, Simpson, Musil and on it goes. We’ll see these young men get sent down soon, and maybe some surprises, although Tyler Pitlick appears to be sitting in a good spot for the Oiler roster.

One thing we should keep in mind? The possibility of a trade. If the Oilers make a move with a team like the Bruins, there’s a good chance one of these young blue, like Gernat, will be a part of it.

KHL Season 2011/12

Anton Slepyshev scored today, and his rates are looking good despite getting about the same amount of playing time as one year ago.

SLEPYSHEV IN THE KHL

  • 2011-12 (age 17) 39GP, 4-3-7 (8:55 TOI, 28 shots) (1.21 points-per-60) (4.83 shots-per-60)
  • 2012-13 (age 18) 26GP, 7-2-9 (12:40 TOI, 63 shots) (1.64 points-per-60) (11.48 shots-per-60)
  • 2013-14 (age 19) 36GP, 3-5-8 (10:18 TOI, 59 shots) (1.30 points-per-60) (9.55 shots-per–60)
  • 2014-15 (age 20) 10GP, 1-3-4 (10:09 TOI, 18 shots) (2.37 points-per-60) (10.66 shots-per-60)

The points-per-60 has seen a nice jump, it will be interesting to see if his recent success (he’s 1-1-2 in his last 2 games) will get him more TOI. Either way, the Russians in the system have enjoyed a very nice fall, let’s hope it stretches into winter.

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35 Responses to "I KNOW WHAT I LIKE (IN YOUR WARDROBE)"

  1. LostBoy says:

    LT puts the centers in the middle?

    I feel like my head might explode.

    It’s right…yet somehow…wrong….

    🙂

    (forgive me if this is something that happened earlier that I missed, first time I’ve seen it)

  2. RexLibris says:

    Tkachev didn’t sign during Jameison’s show today, LT.

    Holding out hope that something is announced on the air during tomorrow’s show?

  3. nelson88 says:

    why do you hate Kale Kessy so much?

  4. book¡je says:

    LostBoy:
    LT puts the centers in the middle?

    I feel like my head might explode.

    It’s right…yet somehow…wrong….

    (forgive me if this is something that happened earlier that I missed, first time I’ve seen it)

    He’s always put the center in the middle. Any other place wouldn’t make sense.

  5. Lynas1 says:

    Hey LT. In my mind I would have switched the Hamiltons. Wouldn’t they want to give Curtis an offensive push to see what he has before making a decision? Thoughts?

  6. Lynas1 says:

    book¡je: He’s always put the center in the middle.Any other place wouldn’t make sense.

    Agreed. All bloggers/media it seems don’t have any consistency re: left handed (right shot) vs right handlers (left shot). Always leaves me scratching my head and googling a picture.

  7. supernova says:

    Is Parkinen a true left or can he play both?

    If he is versatile I can see him playing all over the line up and Nelson spotting Moroz and C. Hamilton with Yakimov and Ford.

    I could see them giving Yak the zone starts push at the start of the season to get his confidence going and them putting him in tougher assignments as he plays more and more.

  8. RexLibris says:

    I don’t really have any particular feelings about Derek Jeter one way or another, but this article is pretty funny in and of itself.

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/sep/26/derek-jeter-conspiracy-theories-yankee-stadium-final-game

    This excerpt pretty much sums it up: After rain almost forced the game to cancel, a rainbow appeared. Is it possible that some organization with sophisticated misting technology, perhaps with a history of staging theatrical, seminal moments such as moon landings and aircraft-carrier victory banners, could have set up the whole thing?

  9. LostBoy says:

    book¡je: He’s always put the center in the middle.Any other place wouldn’t make sense.

    It’s left…yet somehow…wrong…

    It’s right…yet somehow…left….

    Somewhere in there…

    No, never mind, you are indisputably correct.

  10. Ontarioil says:

    I don’t know if i’ve ever seen an AHL defense depth chart where the whole top 6 (top 7 with Klefbom) had a legit chance to get over 40 Nhl games, not saying a guy like Osterle will get there but based on what we’ve seen he’s a prospect.

  11. RexLibris says:

    Ontarioil:
    I don’t know if i’ve ever seen an AHL defense depth chart where the whole top 6 (top 7 with Klefbom) had a legit chance to get over 40 Nhl games, not saying a guy like Osterle will get there but based on what we’ve seen he’s a prospect.

    But does that mean the Oilers are finding good defense prospects, or that they’ll be running through these guys like Kleenex over the next year or two trying to find a decent blueliner?

    SEE OILERS! THIS IS WHAT YOU’VE DONE TO US!

    Actually, I kind of agree. Gernat I think could get about half a season or more as someone tries to work the kinks out of his game, Musil, well, coaches love these guys, Oesterle looks like a smart puck mover and those guys always find ways to stick around (Corey Potter as an example), same with Simpson although I think he’s more of a prospect than Oesterle, and then you’ve got Klefbom who’d be a shoo-in at this point were it not for Ference, in my opinion.

    Not sure about Hunt, Davidson and the rest, though. I’d love to see Davidson make a full NHL season and would cheer like mad for him.

  12. RexLibris says:

    I know this isn’t a game day thread, but just in case anyone is trying to fit in some last-minute BBQ

    http://imgur.com/gallery/GLkAgUi

  13. dessert1111 says:

    LT, are podcasts of your show going to be available online again? Since the new tsn website migration I haven’t been able to locate them.

  14. PaperDesigner says:

    What I don’t get about a player like Slepyshev, who clearly has the pedigree of a legitimate NHL prospect, is why he wouldn’t come over to North America for a few years if only to get more playing time.

    It just seems that if you are under 23 in Russia, you DO NOT PLAY. I mean, good grief, who’s the last teenager they let break the 10 minute mark? Malkin?

    If I was his agent, I would consider advising him to come to North America for a few years, and if the NHL doesn’t work out, head back to Russia when you’re old enough to not stuck to the bench for most of the game.

  15. TheOtherJohn says:

    Do not let anyone understate where Oilers currently are. We have an incredible NHL roster!!

    We have 2 NHL calibre goaltenders

    We have 6 top 4 calibre D and 10 of the best forwards in the modern day NHL.

    If we play to our very real potential we could win the Pacific Division.

    We have one of the best top lines in NHL history in Hall/RNH/Eberle,. We have superb secondary scoring in Arco’s & Draisatl’s lines. And possibly the best defensive lines in the NHL, it’s reminiscent of Gainey, Jarvis & Charboneau

    Is it possible we win the WC? Has a team ever gone from 28th overall to 1st in the WC in a single season? Because this Oiler team could do it

  16. Logan91 says:

    Sam Bennett is going to haunt the Oilers for a very long time. That kid is a special kind of player.

  17. thepeetso says:

    Logan91:
    Sam Bennett is going to haunt the Oilers for a very long time. That kid is a special kind of player.

    Yep you knew it the moment that Reinhardt was taken.

    Its going to be tough to watch.

  18. raventalon40 says:

    nelson88:
    why do you hate Kale Kessy so much?

    LT, why do you hate Smid so much?

  19. Lois Lowe says:

    PaperDesigner,

    Contracts certainly have a role to play as does the culture shock of moving to a new country, with a new language, away from family and friends. I’m sure there’s a lot of Canadian kids that have trouble cracking an AHL roster that balk at the idea of moving to Europe. There’s a lot more at play, these are peoples’ lives. I have trouble moving from BC to Alberta for work, I can’t imagine how lost I’d feel in Russia.

  20. RexLibris says:

    Bennett looks NHL-ready now.

    If the Flames run Stajan, Backlund, Monahan and Bennett down the middle this year they won’t be drafting in the top two or three outside of winning the lottery.

  21. RexLibris says:

    You know, I thought it was kind of strange how quiet LT was being tonight with the Esks ahead 23-0.

    Then I realized – he’s been married to a Riders’ fan long enough to know to just smile quietly and enjoy his drink.

  22. Gerta Rauss says:

    PaperDesigner,

    I believe our host commented on this quite recently-there is every indication that Slepyshev will be coming to NA next fall ( I can’t remember where it was posted, it may have been over at ON)

    I think the player/agent made a decision to play for 2 years in the KHL and get paid before riding the buses in the AHL in the hopes he makes it to the show. I can understand that decision, it would be hard to walk away from guaranteed money.

    Omark made the same choice,but got run over by Hall, Eberle and Paajarvi when he arrived in NA.

    Bad timing, that’s all.

  23. Lowetide says:

    dessert1111:
    LT, are podcasts of your show going to be available online again? Since the new tsn website migration I haven’t been able to locate them.

    If you follow me on twitter (or LT Eric) you can get them, TSN’s site will settle in as the days roll along. Here”s hour one:

    https://soundcloud.com/lowdownwithlowetide/hour-1-92614-feat-steve-lansky-brian-king-scott-zerr

    and here’s the main page

    https://soundcloud.com/lowdownwithlowetide

  24. Lowetide says:

    RexLibris:
    You know, I thought it was kind of strange how quiet LT was being tonight with the Esks ahead 23-0.

    Then I realized – he’s been married to a Riders’ fan long enough to know to just smile quietly and enjoy his drink.

    Exactly. There are 100s of ways she can get even, why provoke the thought process?

  25. Lowetide says:

    SloopSlappy signed a two-year KHL deal before he was drafted, as he had passed through his first year of eligibility. I can see why a teenager might sign a contract for something certain.

  26. commonfan14 says:

    RexLibris,

    Yup, that’s a solid 1/3 of an okay-good line out there at all times.

  27. RexLibris says:

    Lowetide: Exactly. There are 100s of ways she can get even, why provoke the thought process?

    Because, of course, it was your fault.

    Maybe you shouldn’t tell her that the Riders looked like they could’ve used a 13th man out there tonight.

    😉

  28. RexLibris says:

    commonfan14:
    RexLibris,

    Yup, that’s a solid 1/3 of an okay-good line out there at all times.

    I strongly believe that having talent down the middle more closely aligns with success than on the wing.

    You can outfit a team with wingers a number of ways, but center and defense are harder to solve.

    If the Flames can run that group and then flesh it out with mediocre wingers their dreams of drafting 1st overall are not likely to come true.

    That isn’t a bad thing.

    In fact, one could argue that if they were to improve this season, with their current prospect group, a hasty return to mediocrity would await.

    And I can’t think of a more painful curse to wish on one’s enemy than perpetual mediocrity.

  29. Logan91 says:

    RexLibris:
    Bennett looks NHL-ready now.

    He’s a Taylor Hall type player, he pushes the river (like LT likes to say), and you notice him every time he’s on the ice.

  30. Marc says:

    Lois Lowe:

    I have trouble moving from BC to Alberta for work

    Communist. 😉

  31. godot10 says:

    RexLibris:
    If the Flames can run that group and then flesh it out with mediocre wingers their dreams of drafting 1st overall are not likely to come true.

    Quite a few people think they got the best player in the draft last June.

    Arguably, two of the teams ahead of them, Florida(defense) and Edmonton(size), drafted for need, and maybe Buffalo (pedigree). i.e. The three teams ahead of them went “safe”, rather than”bold”.

  32. gcw_rocks says:

    I would hope they would flip the two Hamilton’s, at least to start the year. Curtis showed some good things playing with skill in Winnipeg and maybe that’s where he can be most successful. Ryan is never going to play for the Oilers, so dropping him down to the third line won’t hurry the big club and gives khaira a veteran mentor on his line.

  33. rickithebear says:

    godot10: Quite a few people think they got the best player in the draft last June.

    Arguably, two of the teams ahead of them, Florida(defense) and Edmonton(size), drafted for need, and maybe Buffalo (pedigree).i.e. The three teams ahead of them went “safe”, rather than”bold”.

    NHLE@22 says best of the Tavares, Stamkos, Hall, Seguin, Rnh, Yakupov group.33G 52A 85P @22
    His body and playing style screams Brule!
    That is why he fell to 4th.

    When a guy like perron (smiling like a little girl) says he passed me into a space i did not see.
    Made it match with the guy who coached getzlaf and draisatl who said he was the better passer.
    Draisatl’s NHLE said 27G 48A 75P @ 22.
    the coach of getzlaf and draisatl ” they are the type of player whose production will increase when he plays with better thinkers.”

    these were the only 2 choices;

  34. oilersnhabs says:

    watch out for Moroz this year.

    oh by the way LT…

    When I lay on the bench, I can always hear them talk…me I’m just a lawnmower, you can tell me by the way I walk.

    You’re welcome.

    Leo

  35. Deadman Waiting says:

    New med recently. I’m cured, if cured includes waking up feeling like I’ve just hammered two quick pints.

    This morning I couldn’t find my coffee grounds. I boiled my water, measured out my beans (kitchen scale +/- 0.1 g), put a tip of a teaspoon of sugar into my pre-washed filter, put an unwashed filter into the other plastic cone, then poured some boiling water through the unwashed filter (this also preheats my mug). Then I moved my hot mug to the business cone and frowned at myself “Where TF are my coffee grounds?” So I went over to the grinder and pulled out the doser. Empty, as expected. Then I took a second, drunken look at the cone filter. Nope, no invisible coffee grounds here, either, not even on closer inspection.

    Where could they be? I just know I measured them out. My scale is still sitting there with his lid off. Oh, right! One has to turn the grinder on in order for whole beans to turn into bean fragments. I’ve only practiced this routine 3500 times over the past five years.

    In any case, I’ve heard that the prospect of waking up drunk (or hung over) every day for the rest of my adult life is not as much of a cognitive impediment as it might at first seem. Some hardy souls even seem to make half a go of it. Besides, a “cure” is as good as a rest: it provides one with a whole new Vista of things to bitch about, until the new shiny wears thin.

    ———

    I need to get Byrne off my desk, so here’s another small instalment concerning How Music Works.

    Part of what makes words work in a song is how they sound to the ear and feel on the tongue. If they feel right physiologically, if the tongue of the singer and the mirror neurons of the listener resonate with the delicious appropriateness of the words coming out, then that will inevitably trump literal sense, although literal sense doesn’t hurt. If recent neurological hypotheses regarding mirror neurons are correct, then one could say that we empathetically “sing”—with both our minds and the neurons that trigger our vocal and diaphragm muscles—when we hear and see someone else singing. In this sense, watching a performance and listening to music is always a participatory activity. The act of putting words down on paper is certainly part of song-writing, but the proof is in seeing how it feels when it’s sung. If the sound is untrue, the listener can tell.

    Lowetide mentions the failure of this process all the time: those days when “nothing rhymes”.

    Just a few more sentences before I obligate the entire Lowetide community to purchase every book or song Byrne has ever composed, sung, or fawned over.

    I try not to pre-judge anything that occurs to me at this point in the writing process—I never know if something that sounds stupid at first will in some soon-to-emerge lyrical context make the whole thing shine. So no matter how many pages get filled up, I try to turn off the internal censor.

    People, do remember to turn off the internal censor in a good way. There’s more than one way to skin a cat, and some of them produce the most unpleasant sound imaginable.

    Sometimes sitting at a desk trying to force this doesn’t work. I never have writer’s block, exactly, but sometimes things do slow down. At those times I ask myself if my conscious mind might be thinking too much—and it is exactly at this point that I most want and need surprises and weirdness from the depths. Some techniques help in that regard. For instance, I’ll carry a micro-recorder and go jogging …

    Several of the books about writing come close to insisting that every mortal writer contends with writer’s block at some point. I just went “neh” every time I came across this assertion. I love Byrne all to pieces for exposing this myth about writer’s block for what it is.

    People end up with a gun to their head due to social constraints (aka “deadlines”) cocked to fire at the first use of the gear shift. Then you come up to a steep hill where you don’t have the energy to make it over in a single ballistic charge, and neither do you have enough torque to think-your-can over the hump, chug by chug. Writer’s block mainly comes from playing Russian roulette with the cost–benefit function. The starving artist justifies his or her suffering with visions of selling a screenplay to Hollywood. Coincidence: The first script I’m going to sell to Hollywood is the one I started this morning.

    The idea is to allow the chthonic material the freedom it needs to gurgle up. To distract the gatekeepers. Sometimes just a verse, or even a phrase or two, will resonate and be sufficient, and that’s enough to “unlock” the whole thing. From there on, it becomes more like fill-in-the-blank, conventional puzzle solving.

    I bet Weird Al would agree with this passage 100%. His thesaurus, by reputation, is even bigger than mine.

    This particular writing process could also be viewed as a collaboration …

    This begins another great paragraph—one I can hardly ravage with a racket and rattle of elliptical lead slugs—that ends off the chapter.

    I count myself thrilled to come across three entire pages this cogent out of every dozen books I read. Maybe writers just shouldn’t write about writing. Maybe we should just leave that job to the musicians. If there are more musicians like Byrne out there, the great pedagogues of writing fiction can count themselves outclassed.

    ———

    I regard “writer’s block” as simply a stupid term.

    No one would describe an empty well as a “water block”. What writers get is usually “delivery block” where they’re trying to tow the wrong wagon to the wrong city. Their ego made a deal with Lucifer, they fell behind on payments, and now Lucifer has slapped a wheel clamp onto the trailer hitch.

    The burdened writer now discovers that the only way forward is through the fire swamp (with a fixed, heavy load) and now the encumbered dune-buggy-of-the-clamped-wagon has a turning radius of 100 meters. Of course, whenever you make a misstep and come up to a hidden bend in the road you can’t possibly navigate with an iridescent orange, alimony hitch hackle, you just slap it into reverse and push your wagon back out the same way you came in; that always works out great, especially if reverse sends you back up a muddy, root-strewn path you just descended in slalom mode.

    Pretty soon you’re sitting at the top of grassy, rain-slicked knoll (having used up a quarter tank of gas on the last short reversal) afraid to let your foot of the clutch to embark in any direction at all.

    It’s nothing you can’t sort out in ten minutes with the blue toothpick: a welder’s mask, a pair of oxyacetylene canisters, some rubberized hoses, and the Oral B devil caries eviction wand will limber up your cause lickety-split.

    Goodbye, cruel screenplay. Hello, chthonic gurgle.

    Of course, the devil is no fool. If you unwisely bargained for a tiny diamond phial of Beelzebub’s Patented Egobalm (complete with attractive platinum neck chain), the wicked one has surely wrapped any encumbered strut you might like to cut through with the skin of a living cat—slick side out—infused with whatever piece of yourself you gave away.

    First, the searing pain. Then, the burnt fur smell. Orange Kzinti fur, not dead yet.

    ———

    Though they may travel in pairs, Egobalm is not to be confused with the Ergobahn knee-slap social-media superhighway.

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