WAIVERS AND WAVERING

by Lowetide

David Musil will be waiver eligible this fall and the Edmonton Oilers will have a choice to make: Risk losing him or keeping him on the roster as a 7D or 8D. This is exactly what happened last fall with Brandon Davidson, who is now (probably) one of the four most valuable defensemen in the organization. Will Musil see the same treatment this fall? My guess is no, but we will find out in due time.

Using the 23-man roster limit as our guide, there are pressure points emerging across the NHL in regard to waivers. Some teams will make trades before cutdown day, while others will risk losing players. Here is a quick guideline of the top players I see who could come available via waivers:

  1. R Ryan Sproul, Detroit Red Wings. The young man has been in the AHL for three years and is NHL-ready. I think he makes the big club based on numbers, but it is not a slam dunk and the Oilers should leap at the chance to add the puck mover.
  2. L Josh Leivo, Toronto Maple Leafs. I am probably wrong in my counting, but this is a fine prospect and there appears to be no room. If Toronto attempts to slide him through, Edmonton should grab him.
  3. L Teemu Pulkkinen, Detroit Red Wings. They will deal him long before he hits the waiver wire, but someone is heading out of Detroit based on their having 17 signed forwards at this time. A dandy young player.
  4. C Mark McNeill, Chicago Blackhawks. There are things about him (RH, two-way center, better speed than Lander) that would make him an attractive addition. I wonder if the Oilers end up trading for him if he doesn’t make the Hawks this fall.
  5. L Kenny Agostino, St. Louis Blues. The Oilers don’t specifically need a LW, but this guy is 24, scored 57 points in 65 AHL games and is 6.01, 200. I think Edmonton might look at him in an effort to shore up the depth forward spots.
  6. C Derek Grant, Buffalo Sabres. I didn’t understand why he hadn’t received a long NHL look—apparently Buffalo agreed. Grant went 27-18-45 in 36 AHL games last season, followed by 15 games where he averaged 11 minutes a night. I hope he hangs around for expansion. Make sure you are UFA next summer, young man.
  7. RD Connor Carrick, Toronto Maple Leafs. An interesting young player, I don’t think the Leafs have room for him. Has scored 45 points per 82 AHL games and may have enough to help an NHL team.
  8. RD Stefan Elliott, Nashville Predators. He is an RFA and is in the journeyman portion of his career, but Elliott posted 24 points in 84 games and is a righty—a player who could help the Oilers organization.
  9. RD Scott Mayfield, NY Islanders. Edmonton liked him in his draft year and Mayfield has shown some progress. He is a defensive defender with size, Edmonton has a bunch of those types—but Mayfield is a righty.
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Ryan

Woodguy:
Ryan,


Show me an example of players that’s above this level but are poor at moving the puck over the major portion of an NHL season.

There’s only 24 of em who can.

I know it was an arbitrary cut off, but its far too exclusive.

I looked at cf60 as it was one of my original ideas. It seems to sway too much by team. It also isn’t useful to discern anything between two players on the same pairing who play significant minutes together. Also, Fayne was excellent by this measure in Jersey.

That’s why you use RelCF/60 and pay close attention to good teams who can have good players with slightly negative Rel, they will tell you where to set your line in the sand.

Also,

Fayne played with Greene.

None of these metrics will exclude the partner effect.

I think there’s a miscommunication here.

I am saying any defensemen who can post 1 p/60 over a course of a season is a good bet to be able to transition the puck.

For those under the cut-off, follow the steps I gave examples of to predict if they can move the puck.

If their most common d partner plays more minutes at evens than they do, that’s one red flag.

If their d partner’s A2/A1 ratio is significantly higher than there’s, that could be a red flag.

Woodguy

Ca$h-McMoney!:
GCW_69,

The correct narative around TMac was as follows:

1.He’s a good coach.
2. Maybe not elite.
3.He’s certainly not a bad coach.
4.if/when the Oilers are bad in the future we won’t fire the coach.We will fix the god damn f*#king roster.

Truth

rickithebear

frjohnk: So the reason why Fayne went from allowing 6.5 high danger scoring chances per 60 in NJ in 13-14 while playing top competition to allowing 11.6 and 12.2 high danger scoring chances per 60 in the last two seasons with Edmonton was because he was not in shape?

Phew! All along I thought New Jersey’s system made Fayne’s numbers look good.

if that is what you gleaned from that?
Ok then.

1. Under Deboer Greene and Fayne had great numbers.

2. Next 2 years under new coaches in NJ Larsson continued to maintian similar numbers.
greenes numbers climbed.
Larsson held!
Greene was worse!

3. we have the #5 HSCA save% goalie and NJ has the #3 HSCA save% goalie.

4. SJS under Wilson and Tmac also had a history of younger Dmen developing into low SA and top end HSCA D.
when you look at Braun and vlasics progression under TMAC they were
strong SA d and top 30 HSCAD.

5. 14-15 they all bailed on TMAC.

6. Doboer a return to Elite standard HSCA and SA rates in SJS.
Deboer and Tmac similar numbers from the players.

7. fayne has Decent SA rates under Eakins/MacT / Nelson
with Nelson rolling Klefbom and Fayne together they generate 2 elite HSCA games to 1 AVG/bad.
resulting in similiar but slightly higher numbers in edm.

8. Fayne being sent down and Fitness are declared an issue. 15-16 to 2016 offseason.
I analyze the mechanics of play for each position player.
Look at that players specific playing style.
You need to look at video from NJ; 1st yr EDM and 2yr EDM!

9.Sekera a 32.60 + SA/60 and bottom 20 HSCAD when facing first comp is paired with Fayne.
Paired together facing 1st comp Fayne zooms up 3.7 SA and HSCA and Sekera zooms down in his career SA and HSCA.

Who is the positive push?

So concern over not having Schnieder?
A drop from #3 to #5

Concern over team system.
SJS and NJD develop strong SA and HSCA D.
we saw an improvement in HSCA performance from 2 young D KLefbom and Davidson under Tmac.
We see similiar SA and HSCA results between same players under Tmac and Deboer in SJS.

We saw Sekera’s SA and HSCA numbers improve against 1st comp with a less than fit Fayne.

Larsson RD
KLefbom LD
Fayne RD
Davidson LD

hopefully provide enough depth that Sekera a top SA and HSCA d aginst 2nd comp never sees 1st comp.

GCW_69

The stuff out of Montreal on their analytics guy sure is interesting.

For me, the mandate of a hockey analytics department should be three fold:
1) Reality check on decisions. Do the numbers align with management’s intuition? If not, provide guidance to management on what they might should consider before making a decision, or suggesting further analysis management might do before proceeding (this is what Toronto’s scouting department uses analytics for)
2) Bring new insights fit management’s consideration (hidden gems, market inefficiencies, etc.)
3) Explain what has happened that goes beyond judgment. Providing linkages between drivers and outcomes.

Montreal clearly had issues grasping this. Need in Behind the B, I am not convinced Chiarelli does either.

Gordies Elbow

~ Hall of Shame ~: Some forget that for Reinhart schedule B includes league paid bonus that don’t count against cap and 1.5M inbonuses that would count. (Not to be confused with the 850K in more achievable schedule A).

So does anyone know the terms NYI gave GR for schedule B?. And the cap implications this year (even if he is unlikely to hit them even if he plays 82)

I posted the following in the last thread, but it may have been missed.

It has to be for the league-wide performance bonuses.

From the CBA: “A Player and Club may also negotiate individual bonuses payable by the Club for the League-wide Awards/Trophy Bonuses and League Performance Bonuses set forth below, except where specifically stated otherwise, in amounts to be individually negotiated between a Club and a Player (the Club and Player could agree to pay more, or less, than the amounts payable by the League, set forth below). The maximum aggregate amount that a Club can pay a Player (in addition to any amounts paid by the League to such Player) on behalf of a Player’s Individual “B” Bonuses is $2 million per season. There is no limit on the quantity (as opposed to the dollar amount) of League-wide Awards/Trophies and League Performance Bonuses a Player may receive from the Club.”

He could have an additional bonus of up to 2 million for winning the Norris, Hart, etc., making the official NHL All-Star Team, or for being “A defenseman who finishes among the top ten (10) defensemen in the League in goals, assists, points, points per Game (Minimum 42 Regular Season Games played by Player and comparison group) or ice time among defensemen (aggregate and/or per Game.)”

GCW_69

Ca$h-McMoney!:
GCW_69,

Oh I agree, it’s not fixed (it’s better).I’m just saying clearly we aren’t blaming the coach anymore.

Ah, on that we can agree.

GCW_69

spoiler: I would bet that his more frequent handling of the puck holds up over the rest of your sample, and that in itself is encouraging.

I have a funny feeling that Chia made a phone call to SportLogiq for their passing stats before pulling the trigger that sent away his stud winger.

If you watched Behind the B you would have much less faith Chiarelli made that phone call.

Ca$h-McMoney!

GCW_69,

Oh I agree, it’s not fixed (it’s better). I’m just saying clearly we aren’t blaming the coach anymore.

GCW_69

Ca$h-McMoney!:
GCW_69,

The correct narative around TMac was as follows:

1.He’s a good coach.
2. Maybe not elite.
3.He’s certainly not a bad coach.
4.if/when the Oilers are bad in the future we won’t fire the coach.We will fix the god damn f*#king roster.

I am with you in the first three. I am less convinced on the fourth, at least the latter half of it. They are still a veteran two way C or RW (Versteeg/Pirri), another RHD with PP ability who won’t cost Nuge (Franson, Miller, etc), and real back up goalie (Ramo, Enroth) away from having an acceptable roster for the fall, let alone fixed one.

Woodguy

Ryan,


Show me an example of players that’s above this level but are poor at moving the puck over the major portion of an NHL season.

There’s only 24 of em who can.

I know it was an arbitrary cut off, but its far too exclusive.

I looked at cf60 as it was one of my original ideas. It seems to sway too much by team. It also isn’t useful to discern anything between two players on the same pairing who play significant minutes together. Also, Fayne was excellent by this measure in Jersey.

That’s why you use RelCF/60 and pay close attention to good teams who can have good players with slightly negative Rel, they will tell you where to set your line in the sand.

Also,

Fayne played with Greene.

None of these metrics will exclude the partner effect.

Ca$h-McMoney!

GCW_69,

The correct narative around TMac was as follows:

1. He’s a good coach.
2. Maybe not elite.
3. He’s certainly not a bad coach.
4. if/when the Oilers are bad in the future we won’t fire the coach. We will fix the god damn f*#king roster.

square_wheels

So I’ve learned that you can’t shit talk Shane Doan on Twitter without half of Arizona losing their minds. Apparently “the Captain” does no wrong on the ice, even though 29 other teams would tell you he’s one of the dirtiest and cheapest players in the league.

First game against the Yotes this year, Lucic needs to remind Doan his usual slew footing, blindside and late hits are no longer tolerated.

How the narrative around Doan that’s he’s this “Class Act” only applies to his off-ice activity. On-ice, he’s one the worst.

Am I alone in this assessment ?

GCW_69

stush18: On April 24th, 2015, chiarelli was hired. He then hired Todd mclellan on May 19th. Todd mclellan, who studied under Babcock, who is universally described as an ELITE coach. You’re lying if you didn’t think he was an unreal coach while he was in San Jose. Many here claimed he was the reason for there success.

If you read the sharks blogs from before and around the time TMac was fired in San Jose and hired in Edmonton there was good evidence that TMac had his flaws as a coach. The realistic expectation of TMac was that he would be a much better coach than the Oilers have had in the recent past, and more specifically that he would be better than Nelson.

If you were expecting elite, you probably didn’t do your homework.

GCW_69

stush18,

Are you Chiarelli ‘s mom?

frjohnk

Ryan: I’ll take a look when I can.

My first thought are number passes might not be useful.

If you’re Laco Smid collecting the dump in, you”re going to get credited with a pass every time you look to make one to Visnovsky who will be the guy transitioning the puck up the ice.

Yet you’re never going to make an actual breakout pass.

I agree about the number of passes. if you have player A try to attempt 200 passes but only make 125 while player B attempts 125 passes and makes 110, in this list player A is better because attempts are not recorded.

They do list where the pass is made from to where it is received and I believe who received it, so a person can find out who is making the breakout pass.

I don’t think the passing data project is mind blowing but may have some uses.

Ryan

frjohnk:
Ryan,

https://hockey-graphs.com/2015/12/18/passing-project-data-release-volume-i/

You might want to take a look at this.It lists passes that lead to a shot attempt and labeled are
A1- last pass before shot
A2- 2nd last pass before shot
A3- 3rd last pass before shot

Now a person can go through the data and find out where the pass was made from and what kind of pass it was and there are other things such as did it lead to a shot on net, scoring chance, was it an oddman rush etc.
Im too busy to really mine the data but I did have a quick peak at New Jersey.

I did a quick run through to see how Larsson and Greene faired here.And if I did the calculation correctly, Greene made something like 145 passes in this sample size while Larsson was only about 20 less.( I did the calculation last night, lost the numbers, dont have time before work to do it again)

It doesnt tell us the rate of success for pass attempts, but it gives me an idea that Greene was not the only moving the puck in that pair.

I’ll take a look when I can.

My first thought are number passes might not be useful.

If you’re Laco Smid collecting the dump in, you”re going to get credited with a pass every time you look to make one to Visnovsky who will be the guy transitioning the puck up the ice.

Yet you’re never going to make an actual breakout pass.

Genjutsu

Some thing to consider is that Larsson was, for quite a while, the consensus number one during his draft year.

He fell to the Devils, who won the lottery that year.

This is a very good player.

He has a very good pedigree.

He has a very good track record.

Much like the Reinhardt trade a year ago the only real issue is the price paid.

frjohnk

Ryan,

https://hockey-graphs.com/2015/12/18/passing-project-data-release-volume-i/

You might want to take a look at this. It lists passes that lead to a shot attempt and labeled are
A1- last pass before shot
A2- 2nd last pass before shot
A3- 3rd last pass before shot

Now a person can go through the data and find out where the pass was made from and what kind of pass it was and there are other things such as did it lead to a shot on net, scoring chance, was it an oddman rush etc.
Im too busy to really mine the data but I did have a quick peak at New Jersey.

I did a quick run through to see how Larsson and Greene faired here. And if I did the calculation correctly, Greene made something like 145 passes in this sample size while Larsson was only about 20 less. ( I did the calculation last night, lost the numbers, dont have time before work to do it again)

It doesnt tell us the rate of success for pass attempts, but it gives me an idea that Greene was not the only moving the puck in that pair.

Ryan

Also, Schultz is the classic example a guy who’s good at moving the puck in the ozone but not great at transiting the puck as you know. So far, he’s never spent enough time in the ozone to crack 1p/60 even during the lockout shortened season where he came close.

Ryan

Also, I agree that the A2/A1 ratio could be just noise. it was something that jumped out at me looking at small set of players.

For players that produce a high number of primary assists and points, the A2/A1 ratio definitely doesn’t seem useful.

Ryan

Woodguy:
Ryan,

A couple things jump out at me.

1) 1pt/60

Only 26 Dmen achieved that last year. That’s a really low number and excludes many

I’m not sure pts/60 measures puck moving.It may measure “how active and good are they in the ozone”

2) A2/A1

A2’s show a lot of volatility from year to year so you might be measuring noise.

A1 showing “puck moving” would dictate that their outlet pass went to a guy who scored, which is a rare way for goals to happen.

I would say that A1 also “mostly”measures “activity and ability in the ozone”

Some teams use their Dmen actively in the ozone and some don’t so there are probably team effects in their as well.

I’m not sure we can measure puck moving through points.

My first guess is that corsi for (cf/60) is probably better as you are measuring many more events and those events don’t have to include the Dman touching the puck in the ozone.

I was writing a set of criteria to overlay on a player to help predict if they are good at moving the puck.

The 1 point per sixty was an arbitrary cut off that I set meaning I think defensemen who can score above this level are very likely able to move the puck well. I can’t think of anyone who score above this level who is poor at transitioning the puck. It doesn’t mean that it’s correct, but it was a premise that I set.

Show me an example of players that’s above this level but are poor at moving the puck over the major portion of an NHL season.

Also, I didn’t mean that a player had to score >1 point per sixty to be included as potentially a good to excellent puck mover. Just that if they are above this level, I don’t think there is cause for concern about their puck moving ability.

I looked at cf60 as it was one of my original ideas. It seems to sway too much by team. It also isn’t useful to discern anything between two players on the same pairing who play significant minutes together. Also, Fayne was excellent by this measure in Jersey.

Again, I was looking for patterns in data to find predictive possibilities.

They all could be wrong. I am just throwing ideas out there. 🙂

Ryan

Barrie’s last two seasons

1. P/ 60 was 0.99 and 1.55. Except both years. I’m convinced that if a dman can post >1 p/60 over the major portion of a season, he can transition the puck.

2. Toi. 1 last year and 5 the year prior.

3. A2/A1 ratios. When player post >1 ppg it seems to break the model.

4. He played more minutes than his linemates.

Woodguy

Ryan,

A couple things jump out at me.

1) 1pt/60

Only 26 Dmen achieved that last year. That’s a really low number and excludes many

I’m not sure pts/60 measures puck moving. It may measure “how active and good are they in the ozone”

2) A2/A1

A2’s show a lot of volatility from year to year so you might be measuring noise.

A1 showing “puck moving” would dictate that their outlet pass went to a guy who scored, which is a rare way for goals to happen.

I would say that A1 also “mostly” measures “activity and ability in the ozone”

Some teams use their Dmen actively in the ozone and some don’t so there are probably team effects in their as well.

I’m not sure we can measure puck moving through points.

My first guess is that corsi for (cf/60) is probably better as you are measuring many more events and those events don’t have to include the Dman touching the puck in the ozone.

Ryan

Larsson’s last two years.

1.last year he had a 0.6 p/60. No exemption. Year prior. 1.16. Exception lol?

2. Last year was #1 toi/60, was forth the year prior.

3. Still a2/a1 ratio above 1 both years.

4.played mostly with Greene both years. Slightly more toi/60 at evens than Grrene last year. Big gap two years ago.

5. His A1/A2 ratio was better than Greene’s marginally last year!!! The year prior Greene’s is > 2:1 while Larsson’s is just over 1 suggesting Greene was the puck mover.

Good news is this suggests that he was relied on to move the puck last season.

Ryan

Okay guys, I have a quick update.

First, the set of markers for red flags for elite, average, and poor puck movers… I’m just looking for visual trends and would need someone else to do the hard word of actually running the numbers to verify…

1. P/60 5v5. It it’s over 1 during the course of a season or major portion thereof,yes, this defensemen can move the puck. Low numbers suggest poor puck moving ability.

2. A2/a1 ratio. Not terribly discerning and you have to look at multiple years, but it can be a red flag. If the defensemen has > 1 p/60, this does not apply. If the defenseman has an a2/a1 ratio less than 1 over multiple years, be afraid.

3. Toi/game rank at 5v5. With some exceptions like the Edmonton Oilers who the make decisions not based on winning hockey games, coaches tend to deploy their best defensemen the most toi at 5v5. This was a red flag during Fayne’s glory years in Jersey where he floated a blue bubble in the top left quadrant of the Vollman yet was only 5th and 4rth 5v5 toi/60.

4. Ratios. Keep reading

Solving the Fayne-Schultz paradox.

Fayne’s last two seasons in Jersey

Fayne’s jersey days are tricky. Have a look back at his Vollman from his last years there. It’s a wonder to look at.

1. His p/60 ranged from 0.52 to 0.6. Under 1, so no exemptions. Certainly not terrific range either.

2. Toi/60 he was 5th and 4rth as stated.

3. A2/a1 ratio was greater than1 both years.

4. Compare toi/60 to his most common linemate and you can already guess it is significantly less.

6. Compare ratios of A2/a1 of his most common line mate, Greene, and it’s also significantly less which suggests Greene was the puck mover. Fayne’s was slightly over 1 and Green’s was between 3-5!

Schultz. Last 2 seasons excluding last year since he played for two teams.

1. 0.86 then 0.75 p/60. No exemptions.
2. Toi/60 5v5. He was 1 and 2 because Oilers.
3. Fails the A2/A1 ratio test both years.
4. Played mostly with Ference in 13-14 then Klefbomb in 14-15. Led toi in 13-14 on Oilers and was close behind Klefbomb the following year. Agains, because Oilers.
5. Both Ference and Klembim had a2/a1 > 2 while Schultz’s was <1suggesting that he relied on them to move the puck.

Maybe there's something here or maybe I woke up too early today and couldn't fall back asleep.

Ryan

wheatnoil: Hah, more like with great disorganization comes great running around like a chicken with your head cut off.

I think they cut that line from Spiderman.

Yes. I just meant that I’m excited to see your work.

G Money

A couple of days ago, Woodguy and I were talking about the course of events that destroyed the teams 2015-2016 season.

He was trying to tie the events of the year (e.g. injuries) to the Corsica xGF (expected goals) game by game data.

The raw data is too volatile, so he wanted to use a 25 game rolling average to smooth out the data and look for the real trends, a fairly common approach.

Unfortunately, this has two drawbacks: the curve doesn’t start until 25 games in, and it tends to smooth out most of the in-season variation. It’s more useful for looking at multi-season trends.

A 10-game rolling average follows the season better, but is a pretty jumpy curve given how volatile the underlying data is … and it doesn’t start until 12.5% of the season is already over.

I told him about a new algorithm I’ve adopted, called a guassian smoother (adapted from signal processing techniques).

Here’s some comparison curves I threw out on Twitter:
xGF%: http://i.imgur.com/2U6rgP1.png
xGF60: http://i.imgur.com/tlqYdgH.png
xGA60: http://i.imgur.com/XwprdLN.png

As smooth as the 25MA, and as quick (or quicker) than the 10MA, and no delay.

JimmyV1965

wheatnoil:
Also, I hesitate to share much of the New Jersey data I’m tracking since I’m only 4 games in so it’s a pretty small sample size to draw any conclusions from. However, so far, at least in the four games I tracked, Larsson actually has more zone exits than Greene, more primary assists on zone exits and more total zone exits (of any kind). In fact, he has significantly more controlled zone exits and total zone exits… like almost 50% more. I’m sure that won’t last with more games, but early returns are good.

Also interesting is his D-zone passing. So far (again, super small sample), he leads the team in this. He rarely turns the puck over in the defensive zone. Usually when he touches the puck, the next person that touches it is on New Jersey… at a higher rate than other New Jersey D-men.

Geez, that’s good to hear even if it’s a small sample. I was kinda rattled after reading the Cult of Oil article.

VanIsleOil

Pointed Sticks, Moe Berg with Troc 59. Riv Rock Room circa 1982

Chachi

Wonder Llama: Oh, I was all over the OECD, BLS, ILO, IMF…

Now I’m just April Wine and Chilliwack.

I sympathize with your plight.

Wonder Llama

Chachi: NAFTA and the TPP? Why not do some light reading on OECD transfer pricing rules while you are at it?

Oh, I was all over the OECD, BLS, ILO, IMF…

Now I’m just April Wine and Chilliwack.

JimmyV1965

Centre of attention: Bingo.

Heres my conundrum though. Is it possible to not like the Hall trade, but also think Hall-Demers was not the answer? Asking for a friend.

LOL. That’s exactly where I’m at. Very happy we missed on Demers.

JimmyV1965

Blackwolf:
stush18,

I wouldn’t get to worked up over this. After 10 years of losing, most fans have to great of an emotional attachment to some players.Chia is playing chess, a lot of folks are trying to view it as a checker game.You are correct, lucic absolutelyfactors into the hall trade. Most people don’t want to see it or hear it though. It’s much simpler to look at it as a one for one and lose our collective minds.I’m a huge hall fan, most nights he was the only thing worth watching.But I would rather watch wins rather hall if that’s what it took.

When people say the Lucic signing was all part of the Hall trade it drives me kinda nutty. This is purely spin developed after the trade. Hall was not traded for Lucic. Period. It is possible and probably quite good for the Oil if they were both on the team.

Chachi

Wonder Llama:
Great. Now I’m on youtube listening to classic Canadian rock instead of researching NAFTA and TPP.

Just got through some Doucette. Momma let that boy…

NAFTA and the TPP? Why not do some light reading on OECD transfer pricing rules while you are at it?

JimmyV1965

Centre of attention: You nailed it man. I enjoy your posts and would hate to lose your input. You’re passionate about your ideas, and that is not a bad thing.

I agree. And I think we’re all hoping chia is way smarter than us and everything falls in place. I think I’ve said this already, but I do believe chia has a clear vision of where he wants this team to go, which is the biggest issue facing old mngt.

G Money

Bag of Pucks,

Of this, there can be no doubt, nor question.

In this or any other universe.

G Money

LadiesloveSmid,

Here’s the four players you wanted. Because of the new format I’m using, I put it in a downloadable .xls file for you (sometimes the TOI comes out with an extra :00 at the end): https://app.box.com/s/pfgnmo6h9nphg53i7m2wv02v2mf3vrh4

All of them have played enough to give reasonable validity to the metrics, IMO. Out of that group, DeMelo looks very intriguing.

Let me know if you have any questions.

WG and I are keeping all of this under our hat as we continue to work on it, so please don’t publicly distribute the file, but I will continue to run a player or small group of players on request.

Blackwolf

Darkroom, recorded in Edmonton

Wonder Llama

Great. Now I’m on youtube listening to classic Canadian rock instead of researching NAFTA and TPP.

Just got through some Doucette. Momma let that boy…

Wonder Llama

Bag of Pucks: Right team. Wrong system. We’re ‘dump n chase’ now, not ‘switch into glide.’

Let’s just hope the beat doesn’t go on.

Bag of Pucks

spoiler:
The Kings… Are Here!

Wrong team?

Right team. Wrong system. We’re ‘dump n chase’ now, not ‘switch into glide.’

Chachi

Bag of Pucks: Love the image that conjures up. Chairman of the Board with a big hat. Well done.

Don’t forget the popemobile, this time in black of course.

Bag of Pucks

Chachi: Rush might be more popular outside of Canada these days than in it.

Yes, they had good management.

Wonder Llama

spoiler: Except Quarterflash was from the USA.Maybe they had a Canuck producer or something.

Ah yes. Well, the CRTC had(has?) strange guidelines for deciding what counts as Canadian.

Bag of Pucks

Chachi: In the Toronto area his popularity would have been measured somewhere between Frank Sinatra and the Pope.

Love the image that conjures up. Chairman of the Board with a big hat. Well done.

Chachi

Bag of Pucks: When it comes to discussions of Canadian rock, and I’m sure Gmoney will back me on this, the guidepost is Before Rush / After Rush.

Rush might be more popular outside of Canada these days than in it.

Bag of Pucks

For this year’s RE, how about “Zeppelin Lawsuits?” Gotta be 25 or so of those songs by now?

Chachi

Bag of Pucks: Ultimate cheese but I have a feeling that Italian lad got laid like carpet back in the day.

In the Toronto area his popularity would have been measured somewhere between Frank Sinatra and the Pope.

spoiler

The Kings… Are Here!

Wrong team?

spoiler

Wonder Llama: Canadian content rules on the radio.

Heard “Harden My Heart” and “Doing it Right On the Wrong Side of Town” and “She’s Got To Keep Her 88s Straight” over and over and over.

Except Quarterflash was from the USA. Maybe they had a Canuck producer or something.