Copperhead Road

You can’t make one thin dime defending Peter Chiarelli in this town, but I’ll say this: If there was a trade out there for a scoring forward, he’d have pulled the trigger by now.

Of course, the Oilers are here via a large number of decisions that collectively downgraded offensive options, and that’s on management. The Griffin Reinhart trade has been talked to death, but I think last night we saw other signs of previous decisions coming back to bite the team. As an example: Conor Garland’s two goals. He’s a fifth round pick from 2015, an enormous draft pool that now boasts 74 men who have played in at least one NHL game. To give you an idea about how impressive that number is, the 2014 draft—with a full year more on the books—has 73 NHL men. The 2014 draft’s NHL players average 97 games, 19 goals and 45 points. The 2015 draft’s NHL players average 72 games, 14 goals and 37 points, and it’s only going to get more impressive from here.

Connor McDavid (253, 114-209-323), Mathew Barzal (127, 35-91-126), Jonas Siegenthaler (18, 0-4-4), Christian Wolanin (18, 3-4-7), Caleb Jones (13, 1-3-4), Ethan Bear (18, 1-3-4) were all chosen with Oilers selections and have played in the NHL in the years since 2015. The counter argument is always “they wouldn’t have taken Barzal anyway” and that’s fine, but the picks the team reportedly targeted with the Reinhart picks (Joel Eriksson Ek and Brandon Carlo) have also played in the NHL.

The problem is, you develop a past. Coming four years after Connor McDavid was drafted, the Oilers are still getting beaten to the punch by teams who kept those 2015 picks and then developed them.

In hockey procurement, you can’t go fast enough to get there early.

THE ATHLETIC

The Athletic Edmonton is going to bring it all season long. Proud to be part of a lineup that is ready to cover the coming year. Outstanding coverage from a large group, including Daniel Nugent-Bowman and Jonathan Willis, Lowetide, Minnia Feng and Pat McLean. If you haven’t subscribed yet, now’s your chance. Outstanding offer is here.

  • New Lowetide: The Oilers are getting more good players from the farm; will these kids arrive in time to save Peter Chiarelli?
  • Lowetide: Gauging the Edmonton Oilers’ needs and tendencies for the 2019 NHL Draft
  • Jonathan Willis: Forecasting Oilers junior prospects based on their statistical performance
  • Lowetide: Complete Oilers top 20 prospects, Winter 2018
  • Jonathan Willis: Analysing the risk of heaping heavy minutes on Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl.
  • Lowetide: Oilers midseason report card, brought to you by the letter ‘F’
  • Jonathan Willis: Unlikely scorer Jujhar Khaira has forced his way up the Oilers’ lineup on merit.
  • Black Dog Pat: There’s no in-season balancing for the Oilers
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman: From 2 to 98, Oilers share the stories behind their jersey numbers.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 10 prospect Winter 2018: Dylan Wells.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 9 prospect Winter 2018: Joel Persson.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 8 prospect Winter 2018: Kirill Maksimov.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 7 prospect Winter 2018: Caleb Jones
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 6 Prospect winter 2018: Cooper Marody
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 5 Prospect winter 2018: Ethan Bear.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 4 Prospect winter 2018: Ryan McLeod.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 3 Prospect winter 2018: Tyler Benson.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 2 Prospect winter 2018: Kailer Yamamoto.
  • Lowetide: Oilers No. 1 Prospect winter 2018: Evan Bouchard.

OILERS AFTER 45

  • Oilers in 2015: 17-23-5, 39 points; goal differential -24
  • Oilers in 2016: 23-15-7, 53 points; goal differential +4
  • Oilers in 2017: 19-23-3, 41 points; goal differential -26
  • Oilers in 2018: 21-21-3, 45 points; goal differential -12

OILERS IN JANUARY

  • Oilers in January 2016: 2-2-2, six points; goal differential -2
  • Oilers in January 2017: 3-3-0, six points; goal differential -2
  • Oilers in January 2018: 2-4-0, four points; goal differential -11
  • Oilers in January 2019: 3-3-0, six points; goal differential -5

WHAT TO EXPECT IN JANUARY

  • On the road to: Arizona, Los Angeles, Anaheim, San Jose (Expected 2-2-0) (Actual 2-2-0)
  • At home to: Florida, Arizona, Buffalo (Expected 1-1-1) (Actual 1-1-0)
  • On the road to: Vancouver (Expected 0-1-0) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • At home to: Calgary, Carolina, Detroit (Expected 1-1-1) (Actual 0-0-0)
  • Overall expected result: 4-5-2, 10 points in 11 games
  • Current results: 3-3-0, six points in six games

DEFENSE, LAST NIGHT

  • Jones-Larsson went 14-11 in 15:37, 7-4 shots, no goals 4-1 HDSC. Spent 10:09 with McDavid, but three of the four HDSC came with Milan Lucic on the ice. Went 6-2 in 7:13 against Crouse-Kempe-Archibald. Larson’s offensive sorties were mostly unproductive, he did hammer poor Hjalmarsson senseless with one shot.
  • Nurse-Russell were 16-20 in 21:45, 9-12 shots, 2-1 goals and 7-3 HDSC. Russell made a foolish pass on the first goal, scoring one of his own later in the game. The pairing had problems making substantial outlet passes and it was a problem. Went 8-10 in 10:34 against Panik-Stepan-Hinostroza.
  • Gravel-Benning went 7-10 in 10:31, 4-7 shots, no goals and 1-0 HDSC. As was the case with the second pairing, outlet passing was an issue. Went 4-7 in 5:40 against Keller-Weal-Fischer.
  • Cam Talbot stopped 26 of 29, .897. Some bad luck on the face goal and the winning marker.
  • NHL.com and NaturalStatTrick.

FORWARDS, LAST NIGHT

  • Lucic-Brodziak-Kassian were 6-1 in 4:16, the line had some jump and several impressive chances. Couldn’t cash, and that’s been the season. Brodziak’s penalty was miles from home and costly. I like him as a player but your fourth line cannot cost you as much as this year’s unit has already.
  • Draisaitl-McDavid-Chiasson went 12-3 in 12:36, the lines were shuffling so fast I’m just going to address the top units. Leon looked both exhausted and like he was trying to do too much. Arizona has to be given credit, they didn’t give much clean air to 97. Nice pass from Rattie on the goal.
  • Spooner-Khaira-Puljujarvi went 7-5 in 8:57, it was a respectable evening for the trio. Problem is they need a more skilled player to drive the line. Nuge could make this line better.
  • Nuge-McDavid-Rattie were 7-11 in 7:40, all three men getting a point on the night. Nice pass from Rattie on the 97 goal, Nuge with a nice dish on the second tally.

I understand Mr. Hitchcock’s point but the Oilers are counting on veterans who are midway through what looks like their final NHL seasons. Now, we know contracts means some of these fellows will return, but consider the boxcars on some of Edmonton’s forwards:

  • Milan Lucic 45, 2-7-9
  • Tobias Rieder 32, 0-7-7
  • Zack Kassian 42, 2-4-6
  • Kyle Brodziak 43, 2-4-6
  • Ryan Spooner 23, 2-1-3

McDavid With or Without You. That’s it, that’s all. It hasn’t turned around in four summers of trading draft picks for expensive veterans and signing big name free agents.

Enough. Draft, procure and develop. You can’t trade your way into contention and free agency is where you kill your cap room. Peter Chiarelli and his staff have done a lot of things well, including the draft, building up the Condors and procuring college men like Matt Benning and Drake Caggiula.

The big trades and the big money free-agent contracts have obscured some good works. The trading of draft picks may have buried a fantastic future.

Now, tell me again why dealing the 2019 first-round selection is a good idea.

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212 Responses to "Copperhead Road"

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  1. Ribs says:

    Bruce McCurdy: The more I looked at that goal the more I thought it goes in whether buddy’s face is there or not.

    Yeah, it looks like it would have went in anyway… But… Talbot couldn’t get into position as Garland was in the way (INTERFERENCE!!!). I know he was pushed into the goalie, but how long do you give a guy to get out of the way? Is there any rule for that?

    Haha… Goal well earned. Hard to take that one away from him.

    ___

    It’s pretty clear that a purge needs to happen with this team. Does it start at the deadline? This would mean the kids will play when they are probably not ready, but some picks/prospects may be pinched out of bodies leaving town. Or do they wait until summer? This means there will likely be less/no return on some of these guys, but the kids are left to develop.

    I hope some thought gets put into it.

  2. Ryan says:

    jp: I’m confused. Bennett, Crouse and MPS all played draft +1 outside the NHL. So they aren’t good comps for lack of time to marinate, right?

    JP is pretty rare since not many teams keep unproductive young players in the NHL year over year over year. Based on your original criteria there’s a rather small pool of players to choose comps from.

    If you allow for guys who remained relatively unproductive through draft +3, there are quite a few who eventually turned it around. The following were all top 10 picks who broke out after their draft +3 (and had at least 2 NHL seasons before gaining real traction):

    Jonathan Drouin
    Ryan Johansen
    Josh Bailey
    Kyle Turris
    Andrew Ladd
    The Sedin brothers
    Olli Jokinen

    And to a lesser degree:
    Mika Zibanejad
    Mark Scheifele
    Sean Couturier
    Nino Niederreiter
    Brayden Schenn
    Nazem Kadri

    Also Blake Wheeler managed 3 college seasons without hitting 1 PPG after being drafted, but he’s alright.

    None of this means JP is destined for greatness. But it also doesn’t mean he’s destined to fail based on where he is at age 20.

    BTW, I agree generally that this isn’t a great developmental plan. Just trying to show that it may not be terminal. Without a doubt JP needs to start producing at some point, but there’s still some time for that to happen.

    Great list, thanks.

    Sorry for confusion.

    I had indicated that Bennett played 1 game in his draft plus one year. He did in fact play one NHL game in his draft plus one year. I also put a zero as placeholder for Crouse. He didn’t play in his draft plus one, so I should have just not listed him there as this creatied confusion. As for Magnus is where I made a mistake. I forgot that he played a year in the SEL.

    Right off the top, some of your comps are probably too old- Jokinen, Sedin, and Ladd.

    The Sedins are a terrible comp for anything and they always have been because their late surge in production coupled with their long careers is way too unique.

    Neiderreider and Turris are interesting (in a bad way) because both of their respective teams that drafted them gave up on them and traded them. Neither went right into the NHL and both played substantial games in the AHL (full season).

    Though R Jo played his draft plus one in junior, his offense really popped in his draft plus four. We can hope.

    Scheifiele played two years in the OHL after being drafted. He was over 0.5 ppg in his draft plus 3. That doesn’t work.

    Couturier was a defensive beast from day one. He also hit nearly 0.5 ppg by draft plus 3.

    Kadri’s a great comp in a sense to make my point. Because Kadri played draft plus one in junior, he was waiver exempt and got 27 AHL games in his draft plus four.

    Basically I think of the last year of being waiver exempt as a pivotal year much like the last year of a car’s manufacturer warranty.

    Puljujarvi’s interesting because he’s not a finished product, but he’s on the verge of losing his waiver exempt status. He’s also not a Swiss Army knife of a hockey player. He doesn’t kill penalties. he doesn’t play the bumper or run the half wall on the PP. he doesn’t win face offs or grind guys down on the forecheck. No, his calling card is to produce points and create offense. So far, he doesn’t do that at the NHL level.

    Instead of playing 12 minutes per night at evens trying to play chip and chase not producing offense, he should be down in the AHL playing big minutes and getting substantial power play time to work on developing his game in the minors while he still can.

  3. Gerta Rauss says:

    hunter1909:
    Oilers are like getting coal for Christmas.

    lol

  4. jp says:

    Ryan: Great list, thanks.

    Sorry for confusion.

    I had indicated that Bennett played 1 game in his draft plus one year. He did in fact play one NHL game in his draft plus one year. I also put a zero as placeholder for Crouse. He didn’t play in his draft plus one, so I should have just not listed him there as this creatied confusion. As for Magnus is where I made a mistake. I forgot that he played a year in the SEL.

    Right off the top, some of your comps are probably too old- Jokinen, Sedin, and Ladd.

    The Sedins are a terrible comp for anything and they always have been because their late surge in production coupled with their long careers is way too unique.

    Neiderreider and Turris are interesting (in a bad way) because both of their respective teams that drafted them gave up on them and traded them. Neither went right into the NHL and both played substantial games in the AHL (full season).

    Though R Jo played his draft plus one in junior, his offense really popped in his draft plus four. We can hope.

    Scheifiele played two years in the OHL after being drafted. He was over 0.5 ppg in his draft plus 3. That doesn’t work.

    Couturier was a defensive beast from day one. He also hit nearly 0.5 ppg by draft plus 3.

    Kadri’s a great comp in a sense to make my point. Because Kadri played draft plus one in junior, he was waiver exempt and got 27 AHL games in his draft plus four.

    Basically I think of the last year of being waiver exempt as a pivotal year much like the last year of a car’s manufacturer warranty.

    Puljujarvi’s interesting because he’s not a finished product, but he’s on the verge of losing his waiver exempt status. He’s also not a Swiss Army knife of a hockey player. He doesn’t kill penalties. he doesn’t play the bumper or run the half wall on the PP. he doesn’t win face offs or grind guys down on the forecheck. No, his calling card is to produce points and create offense. So far, he doesn’t do that at the NHL level.

    Instead of playing 12 minutes per night at evens trying to play chip and chase not producing offense, he should be down in the AHL playing big minutes and getting substantial power play time to work on developing his game in the minors while he still can.

    Again, agreed on your greater point that it would probably have been better to give JP more development time and less NHL time over his head.

    But my confusion was mostly that you initially said comps were guys that went straight to the NHL and then struggled for a prolonged time. So I was/am confused why you then included Bennett, Crouse and MPS.

    Otherwise I think you’re being overly strict in discounting comps, but that’s JMO. There are paths for players like JP to eventually reach their potential after struggling for multiple years at the NHL level.

  5. Wilde says:

    Ryan: Puljujarvi’s interesting because he’s not a finished product, but he’s on the verge of losing his waiver exempt status. He’s also not a Swiss Army knife of a hockey player. He doesn’t kill penalties. he doesn’t play the bumper or run the half wall on the PP. he doesn’t win face offs or grind guys down on the forecheck. No, his calling card is to produce points and create offense. So far, he doesn’t do that at the NHL level.

    Instead of playing 12 minutes per night at evens trying to play chip and chase not producing offense, he should be down in the AHL playing big minutes and getting substantial power play time to work on developing his game in the minors while he still can.

    How does Puljujärvi not grind on the forecheck?

    How does one of the only forwards on the team who comes back for zone exits and plays to create entries with control be seen as “trying to play chip and chase”?

    These are just massively, unconscionably misinformed statements. There isn’t a without-the-puck facet of the winger role during the 5v5 game state that Puljujärvi doesn’t excel at. Aiding zone exits, aiding zone entries, disrupting breakouts, forcing dump-ins with backpressure, forcing turnovers, all of these things are assets in his game.

    His calling card is producing offense? Saying that in combination with a discounting of his abilities in other areas suggests you’re painting him as some kind of pure scorer project. By what scouting report or analysis of his game is this evaluation gleaned from? By what empirical measures is this true? He was a high-end but not elite producer in the SM-Liiga who was groomed as a two-way player whose win-conditions were to get the puck back by disruption and harassment, retaining possession through the neutral zone, and generating shot-clock advantages through these things along with his own volume-shooting.

    His shot-share and close-score shot-share was the highest among regular players for Kärpät at 57.4%. 491-364 count. Team average was about 53%.

    His rookie season he scored well with McDavid, poorly without and had a generally positive effect on shot and goal shares.

    The position that he would be better off getting more minutes in the AHL at this time has its merits, but much of what you said here is just plainly indefensible and taints your entire perspective and position.

  6. Wilde says:

    JimmyV1965:
    I have to admit I’m concerned you have JP slotted for the top six next year. Although I like JP, and would rather keep him than the first round pick, slotting him in the top six is really a rinse and repeat of what we always do; count on first line production from a kid who has not demonstrated he is capable of doing that.
    JP has 5 pts and 22 shots in his last 20 games. I think we’re doing him a disservice by saying he’s ready to play a top 6 role. It’s not fair to him and it’s not fair to the team.

    Slotting JP with McDavid is a rinse and repeat of a successful venture.

    The problem with looking at JP’s tptal points over this stretch where he’s with Nuge as an opportunity (that he’s failing to grasp) at being a top-six winger are many.

    They mostly fall under the umbrella of ‘quality of team’.

    Ryan Nugent-Hopkins has not been a prolific scorer at 5v5 over the course of his career.

    The defencemen they play in front of have been a complete and utter mess.

    The whole team’s shot and goal shares have been a complete and utter mess.

    Then, to cap it off, they’re playing against competition better than them, at F and D.

    JimmyV1965: from a kid who has not demonstrated he is capable of doing that.

    Here’s a particular thing that I’d like to address.

    Jesse Puljujärvi’s 5v5 P/60 with McDavid over the last three years is a first-line rate, in minutes where the five-man unit scores more in totality than they do when 97’s on the ice without Puljujärvi.

    I feel like me suggesting to put 98 with 97 is being taken as “let’s see if this works” when I’m actually asserting “this works, so do it.”

    Every other team does this, by the way. Every other team looks at their young, high draft picks that succeed with their existing stars but flounder without them and decide to put their young high draft picks with their stars. In the interest of icing the best roster while developing the player at the same time.

    Mikko Rantanen was good with MacKinnon and trash without. They kept them together. PLD was good with Panarin and trash without. They kept them together. Travis Konecny was bad with Patrick and good with Couturier and Giroux. Same thing. Everyone does this now.

    e: Adding Nylander, who was 48% GF over 2016-17 to 2017-18 without Matthews and 62% with.

    Kyle Connor 52% GF with Scheifele, 47% without. Scheifele’s 67% GF without Connor. All 700+ minute samples from 2017-18 to 2018-19.

  7. OriginalPouzar says:

    2 points up for grabs tonight against BUF.

    Go Oilers!

    Go Mikko (I assume).

  8. JimmyV1965 says:

    Wilde: Slotting JP with McDavid is a rinse and repeat of a successful venture.

    The problem with looking at JP’s tptal points over this stretch where he’s with Nuge as an opportunity (that he’s failing to grasp) at being a top-six winger are many.

    They mostly fall under the umbrella of ‘quality of team’.

    Ryan Nugent-Hopkins has not been a prolific scorer at 5v5 over the course of his career.

    The defencemen they play in front of have been a complete and utter mess.

    The whole team’s shot and goal shares have been a complete and utter mess.

    Then, to cap it off, they’re playing against competition better than them, at F and D.

    Here’s a particular thing that I’d like to address.

    Jesse Puljujärvi’s 5v5 P/60 with McDavid over the last three years is a first-line rate, in minutes where the five-man unit scores more in totality than they do when 97’s on the ice without Puljujärvi.

    I feel like me suggesting to put 98 with 97 is being taken as “let’s see if this works” when I’m actually asserting “this works, so do it.”

    Every other team does this, by the way. Every other team looks at their young, high draft picks that succeed with their existing stars but flounder without them and decide to put their young high draft picks with their stars. In the interest of icing the best roster while developing the player at the same time.

    Mikko Rantanen was good with MacKinnon and trash without. They kept them together. PLD was good with Panarin and trash without. They kept them together. Travis Konecny was bad with Patrick and good with Couturier and Giroux. Same thing. Everyone does this now.

    e: Adding Nylander, who was 48% GF over 2016-17 to 2017-18 without Matthews and 62% with.

    Kyle Connor 52% GF with Scheifele, 47% without. Scheifele’s 67% GF without Connor. All 700+ minute samples from 2017-18 to 2018-19.

    I’ve never said JP will be incapable of playing top six role. In your original statement, you said JP is likely to fill out a top six role next year. That’s what I had an issue with. We project players for roles they have yet to prove the can fulfill. It’s not good for them or the team.

    Look, I get that you like JP, but I think you’ve lost a little objectivity here. Two NHL coaches have yet to play him with McDavid in meaningful minutes. There’s a reason for that, especially when one of them expressly stated that he believed in JP and would unlock his potential. I can only assume that his 5×5 P/60 with McDavid is a small sample size.

    For every Rantanen or Dubois you cite, there’s a Bennet and Virtannen. JP is not the only high pick who has not played significant minutes with his team’s top player.

  9. Wilde says:

    JimmyV1965:

    I’ve never said JP will be incapable of playing top six role. In your original statement, you said JP is likely to fill out a top six role next year. That’s what I had an issue with. We project players for roles they have yet to prove the can fulfill. It’s not good for them or the team.

    You’re talking past me. Jesse Puljujärvi has proven that he can fill that role next to McDavid in the metrics I value. If you’re going to contend what I’m saying, you have to contend with my assertion that he’s already an option there, not with the assertion you /think/ I’m making, wherein I’m projecting him there based on what he could be in the future. I’m talking right now, I think right now he should be there. In the interest of winning.

    What I think is somewhat likely is either Hitchcock comes around on this, or that Puljujärvi progresses enough to produce offense with Nugent-Hopkins. I think the chances of both of those options failing isn’t a large majority.

    JimmyV1965:
    Look, I get that you like JP, but I think you’ve lost a little objectivity here. Two NHL coaches have yet to play him with McDavid in meaningful minutes. There’s a reason for that, especially when one of them expressly stated that he believed in JP and would unlock his potential. I can only assume that his 5×5 P/60 with McDavid is a small sample size.

    Your assumption that I would cite a statistic from a small sample size without indicating that it was from a small sample size is revealing. It’s almost 400 minutes.

    I am fundamentally opposed to many of Todd McLellan’s actions and views that he demonstrated over his time with the Edmonton Oilers. I don’t worry at all about whether or not I’m disagreeing with his actions or his views. I don’t look at whether or not my more micro preferences align with his as validated, and if they don’t, as invalidating.

    On Ken Hitchcock, when I disagree with his decisions I give these things a lot more thought because of how much less time I’ve observed him handle this roster, and my agreement with many of his systematic preferences and philosophies that can be found on YouTube in long videos recorded of him speaking and teaching. On Puljujärvi, he has repeatedly stated two relevant ideas, one directly pertaining to 98, and another that is a general rule’s application affects this situation.

    1) He wants to bring Puljujärvi along at pace.

    2) He likes to establish and work in pairs.

    Both of these things preclude Puljujärvi’s presence on the top line, without that being a statement about his ability with 97 or in general.

    There’s also the hidden factor that 97 might not like playing with him. I think he would, as nearly everyone does, change his mind if it started working. McDavid strikes me as a principled but open-minded person who sticks to his guns but is still malleable, in a good way, like most 22-year-olds are.

    JimmyV1965: For every Rantanen or Dubois you cite, there’s a Bennet and Virtannen. JP is not the only high pick who has not played significant minutes with his team’s top player.

    Sam Bennett also spent 400ish minutes over 2015-16 to 2017-18 with the top offensive player on his team. He dragged Gaudreau’s GF% down. Opposite situation of Puljujarvi – Gaudreau’s 54% GF away from SB, 47% with him, and SB is 43% without Gaudreau, 5% lower than Calgary’s GF% with both on the bench. Literally the opposite situation.

    From 2016-17 to 2018-19 in 400 minutes Virtanen did improve Horvat’s GF%, but he scored at a 4th line rate as opposed to JP’s first line rate, and the GF% increase is nearly all in decreasing the GA/60, and he lowers Horvat’s GF/60 by 0.59, whereas Puljujärvi’s minutes with McDavid were had a 0.15 (ish) increase in GF/60. Virtanen also hurt the shot shares, Pulju improved them. Basically a PDO bump in which Virtanen scored at a 4th line rate.

    Jesse Puljujärvi’s not the only top pick that hasn’t been given a spot up high, but among those who haven’t he has the rare (perhaps even unique) attribute of demonstrably deserving a better shot in the interest of both individual and team success.

  10. Ryan says:

    Wilde,

    Sorry to offend you, I don’t have time to reply at the moment. I will clarify that by saying, “trying to play chip and chase” I was referring to a coached strategy that hitch seems to want him to do and nothing inherent to JP.

    Chip and chase is a challenge for JP. He doesn’t time his chip ins well and he doesn’t retrieve the puck very often. Opposing defensemen don’t have their heads on a swivel fearing a crushing hit from JP. He’s not Tom Wilson.

    As for the two way player you profess, what evidence in his deployment do you see from his coaches that suggests two way ability?

  11. Regretzky says:

    Wilde,

    You are a Master Debater! I wouldn’t want to meet you in a dark alley of the Oilogosphere.

  12. Silver Streak says:

    Lost in time……hey guys…somewhere over the holidays I must have missed a change on this blog.
    its like I missed a days Blog posting….can someone tell me why our blog is 24 hours late….deals with yesterday`s news….I thought maybe it had something to do with LT being in Mexico for a week or so….

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