She Never Spoke Spanish To Me

The Oilers pipeline wasn’t working in the fall of 2017. Elliotte Friedman: The first is unhappiness with the way players are developing at AHL Bakersfield. I did not see Ziyat Paigin myself, but there is disappointment that he has asked to go back to Russia, especially after a summer where he stayed to train in Edmonton. Rightly or wrongly, there is a feeling too many of their prospects are not panning out there. (Sportsnet.ca)

THE ATHLETIC!

The Athletic Edmonton features a fabulous cluster of stories (some linked below, some on the site). Great perspective from a ridiculous group of writers and analysts. Proud to be part of The Athletic, check it out here.

  • New Lowetide: Dave Tippett deploys unproven talent expertly in first Oilers season
  • New Lowetide, Daniel Nugent-Bowman and Jonathan Willis: Oilers ABC: Picking the best players in franchise history, from Anderson to Zuke
  • Jonathan Willis: If the Oilers need to clear money with a buyout, they have one real option
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman: The 5 games that define Leon Draisaitl’s Hart Trophy-worthy season
  • Lowetide: Final Oilers report cards: Second-half impact defines a successful season
  • Jonathan Willis: Does Filip Berglund’s new SHL contract mean he’s done with the Oilers?
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman: Evolution of a star: Why Leon Draisaitl was our Hart pick
  • Lowetide: Oilers get good news from the farm as second-half performances spike
  • Lowetide: Should Oilers prospect Philip Broberg play in North America next year?
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman and Jonathan Willis: Which former Oiler has the best argument to have his jersey number retired?
  • Lowetide: Which Oilers veterans are in roster peril?
  • Jonathan Willis: How good is Anton Slepyshev and what will an NHL return mean for the Oilers?
  • New Lowetide: Oilers’ challenge could be finding relief with a low cap ceiling

2017-18

AHL rookies included Ethan Bear (37, 6-12-18), Caleb Jones (58, 2-15-17), Joe Gambardella (50, 13-6-19). As of now, the three men have combined to play 164 NHL games.

NHL rookies included Pontus Aberg, Bear, Kailer Yamamoto, Keegan Lowe, Nathan Walker but none made a difference.

2018-19

AHL rookies included Tyler Benson (68, 15-51-66), Cooper Marody (58, 19-45-64), Kailer Yamamoto (27, 10-8-18), Shane Starrett (42, 2.33, .918). These man have played a combined 70 NHL games.

NHL rookies: Caleb Jones, Yamamoto, Colby Cave, Josh Currie and Joe Gambardella but once again no one had a real impact.

2019-20

AHL rookies included Evan Bouchard (54, 7-29-36), Ryan McLeod (56, 5-18-23), Kirill Maksimov (53, 5-8-13), Dmitri Samorukov (47, 2-8-10), Stuart Skinner (41, 3.31, .892). These men have played seven NHL games.

NHL rookies and arrivals included Kailer Yamamoto (27, 11-15-26), Ethan Bear (71, 5-16-21), Caleb Jones (43, 4-5-9). Joel Persson (since traded), Benson and William Lagesson played as well. This is a good to very good rookie crop.

The AHL rookies in 2017-18 (Bear, Jones) and 2018-19 (Yamamoto) landed in the NHL in 2019-20. If Jay Woodcroft’s magic continues, we should see Evan Bouchard and Tyler Benson in Edmonton this coming season. Perhaps Dmitri Samorukov, Ryan McLeod and others the following season.

This is what a working pipeline looks like. Jesse Puljujarvi missed it be so very little but missed it all the same.

WOODCROFT

In his first Bakersfield season, he had nine rookies and all nine had a positive story to tell about their game. From Marody and Benson (who were stellar) to Hebig, Yamamoto, Day, Starrett, Wells, Skinner and Vesel, each found an area of the game in which they could flourish. Impressive.

Men in their entry deals (who were not rookies) who were matriculating included prospect blue Ethan Bear, Caleb Jones and William Lagesson.

If we give Woodcroft some credit for Bear, Yamamoto and Jones, and then Bouchard and Benson pop in 2020-21, I think we can conclude the Oilers will have the first established pipeline since the franchise handed the Roadrunners back to the AHL. That’s a long, long time. In my opinion, this coming season, getting Benson and Bouchard to the show and seeing success, is vital. An actual pipeline would represent the ability to have plug and play options in winter and to avoid free agency in summer. Music!

Rasanen moved to the wing during this season just completed, and that impacts his value. If the Oilers still see him as a center, then signing him should be a priority. His NHLE, especially considering his age (22), speed (average) and apparent desire to go home are probably factors in signing him or letting him go. The deadline to sign is August 15, 2021. I don’t believe that changes with his decision to leave college, but this is the NHL so the magic 8-ball may give us different information.

LOWDOWN WITH LOWETIDE

It’s Friday, weekend is on the way! We get started at 10, TSN1260. Scheduled to appear: Steve Lansky from Big Mouth Sports, we’ll chat about some history (1979 the NHL-WHA agreed to merge, Gretzky scored 200 points in a season for the first time in ’81-82. Plus NHL asking teams to check on availability for August games. Matthew Iwanyk will talk NFL draft, MLB season and the flood of CFL Mock drafts we’re seeing this week. 10-1260 text, @Lowetide on twitter. See you on the radio!

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120 Responses to "She Never Spoke Spanish To Me"

  1. ArmchairGM says:

    Pronman said he doesn’t think Rasanen warrants an NHL contract.

  2. ArmchairGM says:

    Looking for McLeod, Maksimov and Samorukov to earn more responsibilities in Bakersfield and boost their production in the coming season. The sophomore year is critical for B-level prospects.

  3. leeinvan says:

    I think with so many of their better players going to the big team, the farm team didn’t really get over that. Next season, I think it will be different, They should have a little more offence and the d will be more settled.
    It’s important that the big team has that pipeline coming every year. The danger in trading away lots of your draft picks is there is a year or two where its pretty skinny down there. I still hate the two 2nds for AA but its done so that’s that.

  4. Rickety Cricket says:

    Brogan Rafferty is officially better than actual NHL players. Folks, you really cannot make this stuff up!

  5. defmn says:

    Rickety Cricket:
    Brogan Rafferty is officially better than actual NHL players. Folks, you really cannot make this stuff up!

    Actually, I believe somebody around here did. 😉

    It’s just that Vancouver was playing so well with a secure hold on a playoff spot they decided they didn’t need him for the stretch run.

  6. dustrock says:

    leeinvan:
    I think with so many of their better players going to the big team, the farm team didn’t really get over that. Next season, I think it will be different, They should have a little more offence andthe d will be more settled.
    It’s important that the big team has that pipeline coming every year. The danger in trading away lots of your draft picks is there is a year or two where its pretty skinny down there. I still hate the two 2nds for AA but its done so that’s that.

    Agreed – that’s the actual pipeline, where you have your players develop, graduate, next group develop and graduate, and the team stays mostly succesful.

    I still don’t think we have the true prospect base yet for an established pipeline, but I agree that we’re much closer than anytime since the Roadrunners.

  7. Rickety Cricket says:

    Maybe someone posted this link already but here is an interesting read:

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/herd-immunity-might-still-be-key-in-the-fight-against-coronavirus

  8. Ben says:

    JimmyV1965: Trump is almost as bad as Trudeau,

    It’s this inane shit that makes reasonable discourse so untenable.

  9. OriginalPouzar says:

    A pipeline of prospects is generally key to NHL success in the cap world. Not only can these players often impact the team in their early 20s they do so on value contracts.

    Ethan Bear was a massive value contract this year as was Kailer Yamamoto.

    Yamamoto will be a massive value contract next year, as will Caleb Jones and likely Evan Bouchard (for the next three years). It would be great to add the name Tyler Benson for next season but we don’t know yet.

    ————-

    WIth Rasanan heading to Europe and turning pro, does this change the time line to get him under contract. We had assumed he was heading back for his senior year at Boston College which would mean the Oilers would have until August 2021 – is that still the case.

  10. Rickety Cricket says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    OP, I wanted to thank you for your provacative questions last night. Amazing! Well done!

  11. Fuhr and Lowething in Vegreville says:

    Ben: It’s this inane shit that makes reasonable discourse so untenable.

    +9767887642447897646865323

  12. Harpers Hair says:
  13. ArmchairGM says:

    leeinvan: Next season, I think it will be different, They should have a little more offence and the d will be more settled.

    Goaltending, too. Running two rookies and an injured starter didn’t help anything at all.

  14. oilersfan says:

    godot10,

    when they

    1) get testing done within 1-2 days of symtpom onset and
    2) prove that giving Hydrochloquine with zinc to people with early symptoms who test positive-will prevent the virus from requiriing hospitalization for 70-80% of the people currently requiring it, then we can go back to normal and the health system will be able to handle it.

    The university of minnesota is doing testing right now. First quarter of participants will be done with data known in 2 weeks.

    Things could be back to normal far faster than we think, With all the brains and money thrown at this problem we wont need to use 1400’s level medicine to normalize the economy.

    https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/news/video/doctor-explains-drugs-tested-coronavirus-potential-efficacy-69704536

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/minnesota-doctor-engaged-fda-approved-hydroxychloroquine-trials-lacks/story?id=69793007

    And please dont link the ridiculous aritcle on bloomberg from two days ago saying chloroqine didnt work. That study was 30 people…15 people with the drug 15 with placebo. 13/15 with the drug lost symptoms right away as did 14/15 with the placebo. It was a useless trial as 14/15 dont normally get better with only placebo…also the dosing of chloroqune was half of what is necessary, and did not include the zinc. there is tons of anecdotal evidence that it will work, and work even better as a prevention. We will have preliminary results in two weeks and full results in 8.

    Also please dont mention the people who tried the chloroquine phosphate to clean their fish tank and died, or the people in nigeria who overdosed (but did not die). of course a person should only take this with the proper dosage prescriped from their doctor who knows their history as some people cant take chloroquine. But there is substantial anecdotal evidence that this will work and there are more trials going on than just the U of Minnesota one.

    The U of M already has 470 people enrolled out of 1500 and should be at full enrollment in a few weeks, with data from the first set available by then…

    Chloroquine costs 10 cents a dose and the global governments could manufacture billions in months…

  15. Lowetide says:

    no politics please

  16. defmn says:

    When it comes to ‘the pipeline’ I generally focus on the 12 positions I consider the core of a winning team. Top six forwards & 3C plus the top 4 dmen and starting goalie.

    It isn’t that the other positions are unimportant so much as that they can generally be filled through UFA signings at only marginal amounts more than ELC contracts. With performance bonuses for ELC’s I’m not certain it is even that much more. The off season work by Holland this year would be an example.

    So how many of those 12 positions remain open at the moment?

    Well, that answer would depend on a couple of judgement calls, of course, mostly related to Connor’s wingers and how you feel about Koskinen. So I see three positions that could stand upgrading or are “of concern”. Athanasiou could surprise but we don’t know whereas I think we all know what Koskinen and Kassian bring.

    Then there is the 3C position with nobody claiming the spot waiting for an answer. McLeod is too much in the future to know one way or another and his is the only name even in the conversation.

    So here we are. We did OK this season with a 1A and 1B goalie situation and I am pretty certain that will be the case next season as well. We have a couple of intriguing goalie prospects in that talked about pipeline.

    Lavoie is at least a year and a half away imo so we are talking about a Slepyshev return and lamenting the Puljujarvi debacle.

    Our defence looks respectable. No clear, dominant #1 but a solid top 4 imo and maybe a solid top 5. Broberg, Bouchard, Sammy all trending at various timelines.

    So really this team is getting close because Nuge is the only UFA on this list of 12 within the next year. Him leaving would be a huge blow but 8 of the 12 postions are locked up for a fair length of time. Nine if you think Kassian is tenable in that position for the next two years.

  17. defmn says:

    I realize that these are stressful times but is it possible to leave the partisan finger pointing for a later time. Isn’t now the time to stick to helpful, factual information rather than repeating click bait nonsense – on both sides of the partisan divide – as the truth?

    EDIT: I see our host already made the same point. My apologies.

  18. Ben says:

    Do we yet have confirmation of Seattle expansion draft rules?

    I wonder if they tweak it seeing as Vegreville was able to run a get-rich-quick scheme on GMs desperate to protect mediocre players.

  19. ArmchairGM says:

    THANK YOU.

  20. frjohnk says:

    Lowetide:
    no politics please

    Very next post

    : Both Trudeau and Trump are unqualified and incompetent

    This made me chuckle

  21. wolf8888 says:

    Good article also a very good article by Dr John Lee on the same page. Thanks Rickerty

  22. wolf8888 says:

    How many have the flu?

  23. leadfarmer says:

    Lowetide:
    no politics please

    But mindless trolling will remain acceptable?

  24. N64 says:

    Actually the left him Utica to work with a goalie coach. The NHL called off the season as soon as they saw the call up papers to play goal for the Canucks.

  25. N64 says:

    Dr. Gottlieb (still on everyone’s speed dial) had another twitter thread last night on the work needed to get to new normal:

    https://twitter.com/ScottGottliebMD/status/1243333347012751361

  26. Melvis says:

    -OK then…can we talk about Deleuze and Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, and rhizomatic theory?

    -The Gentlemen…sawr it last night. Another gem from Guy Richie.

    -I was an altar boy once. I know what some of these guys get up to.The Padre raiding the larder for the bread and the wine makes me chuckle.

  27. Harpers Hair says:

    CBC News Alerts
    @CBCAlerts
    ·
    6m
    Canadian oil falls below $5 US, after dropping $1.94 on the day. All-time high for Western Canadian Select was in summer of 2008, when it was above $100 US. West Texas Intermediate is trading at $21.23 today after falling $1.33.

  28. Rickety Cricket says:

    Thanks for this.

  29. John Chambers says:

    Playoff format:

    If the world can resume in, say, July, I’d like to see the NHL scrap the regular season and jump to a 24-team playoff format.

    Teams 9-16 would playoff against teams 17-24 in a best-of-five. That means Arizona, Chicago, NYR, and Montreal are all in, taking on conference opponents for a chance to compete in the regular playoffs. I believe Calgary would play Winnipeg … it would be exciting as all hell.

    For teams 1-8, all the 1-2 teams would play a series for the Division Championship. Oilers play Vegas, Tampa vs Boston. It serves as a training camp for the top teams and, again, a dream to watch.

    From there we have a regular 16-team playoff based on what shakes out, while the seven teams who didn’t qualify at least get a smaller pool for the draft lottery.

    The draft itself happens in late-July anyway with the now eliminated 15 teams drafting, and the other teams having to be wait until the end of the Stanley Cup tournament to make their 1st round selections.

    I believe it his 16-team playoffs should be seven-game series’ as per usual.

    Dare to dream.

  30. N64 says:

    OK if anyone is wondering why hospitals in Italy had to choose between 45 year old and 55 years old and 65 years old for ventilators or death here is US ICU data to explain:

    Scott Gottlieb, MD Retweeted
    Atul Gawande
    @Atul_Gawande
    Here is the info I cite that this is not just dangerous for the elderly, that a quarter of people age 45-54 need hospitalization, and 5-10%, need ICU care to survive. h/t
    @ScottGottliebMD

    Full breakdown in twitter pic:

    https://twitter.com/Atul_Gawande/status/1243528277064548357

  31. oilersfan says:

    N64,

    N64, have you seen if they used Chloroquine and zinc in Italy? i have spent a long time on google looking and cant find one way or another…probably because i cant speak italian…

    As i mentioned above, although i believe Chloroquine will be the drug of choice as treatment, more importantly i believe it will be proven if taken early, within 1-2 days of feeling symptoms and being tested in that same time frame , will reduce the symptoms so much as to substantially (more than 50%, maybe even as much as 80% more than with no preventative drugs) prevent the need for hospitalization.

  32. pts2pndr says:

    Thanks it was a good read

  33. OriginalPouzar says:

    I can’t imagine there will be any sort of continuation of the 2019/20 season/playoffs and I’m hopeful the sporting world can start up again by October (no sure thing there) but this was a funny quote by Connor:

    “I don’t think we can just step into playoffs. Game 1, Calgary comes to Edmonton and guys just run around killing each other and haven’t played a game in two months. It will end up the Stockton Heat versus the Bakersfield Condors if that’s the case.” – Connor McDavid

  34. N64 says:

    I’m with Dr. Gottlieb on this one. US needs to get away from slow fragmented studies that slow down everyone. WHO is recommending multi drug studies and US can extend a complementary approach out to docs to reduce paper work and get remdesevir, chloroquine and a number of others into physicians hands for early use leaving docs and patients to judge what to use.

    Seem to be a lot of small sample late use studies and assume bigger late and early use studies will emerge but need to push that for multiple drugs. also need substantial side effect data and some preventative dose studies close to contact.

    Finally manufacturing should accelerate for most promising drugs to support test ramp up and subsequent broader release approvals even if it means discarding some later. Personally don’t believe in any one of the promising drugs yet.

    Obviously engineered antibodies is very important when available for most at risk, health care workers, family members and close contacts of confirmed cases, and especially newly infected.

  35. deardylan says:

    Hi LT i’ve turned into a lurker. Love your focus on Oiler hockey no matter what going on.

    Just jumped in to share this news link on how spotify ‘playlists are keeping us sane’ reminded me of this group. Keep sharing your songs and playlists that keep you certainly upbeat during these uncertain times.

    Why playlists are getting me through anxious times:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/27/we-can-make-it-weekly-playlist-for-anxious-times

  36. Hairbag says:

    Everyone has the right to their own opinion, just because it is not the same as yours doesn’t mean that person is any less intelligent. However this take does show your lack of maturity….

  37. Hairbag says:

    I believe the league has stated that the rules will remain the same as they were for Vegas. However don’t expect other GMs to make the same mistakes over again, it should be a tougher road for Seattle this time.

  38. defmn says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    I can’t imagine there will be any sort of continuation of the 2019/20 season/playoffs and I’m hopeful the sporting world can start up again by October (no sure thing there) but this was a funny quote by Connor:

    “I don’t think we can just step into playoffs. Game 1, Calgary comes to Edmonton and guys just run around killing each other and haven’t played a game in two months. It will end up the Stockton Heat versus the Bakersfield Condors if that’s the case.” – Connor McDavid

    Any idea on how the cancellation of the remainder of the season and playoffs would affect the broadcasting contracts?

  39. Lowetide says:

    deardylan:
    Hi LT i’ve turned into a lurker. Love your focus on Oiler hockey no matter what going on.

    Just jumped in to share this news link on how spotify ‘playlists are keeping us sane’ reminded me of this group. Keep sharing your songs and playlists that keep you certainly upbeat during these uncertain times.

    Why playlists are getting me through anxious times:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/27/we-can-make-it-weekly-playlist-for-anxious-times

    Well, drop by when you can. 🙂

  40. Ben says:

    I’m immature because I have the opinion that polemics are rarely productive? (As you simultaneously admit that I have a right to that opinion, even if it’s not the same as yours?)

    I think you better stay in the cornfield, Ray.

  41. Ben says:

    Have you been paying attention to the decision making process of the average NHL GM?

  42. v4ance says:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/03/how-will-coronavirus-end/608719/

    How the Pandemic Will End
    The U.S. may end up with the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the industrialized world. This is how it’s going to play out.

    To contain such a pathogen, nations must develop a test and use it to identify infected people, isolate them, and trace those they’ve had contact with. That is what South Korea, Singapore, and Hong Kong did to tremendous effect. It is what the United States did not.

    The testing fiasco was the original sin of America’s pandemic failure, the single flaw that undermined every other countermeasure. If the country could have accurately tracked the spread of the virus, hospitals could have executed their pandemic plans, girding themselves by allocating treatment rooms, ordering extra supplies, tagging in personnel, or assigning specific facilities to deal with COVID-19 cases. None of that happened. Instead, a health-care system that already runs close to full capacity, and that was already challenged by a severe flu season, was suddenly faced with a virus that had been left to spread, untracked, through communities around the country. Overstretched hospitals became overwhelmed. Basic protective equipment, such as masks, gowns, and gloves, began to run out. Beds will soon follow, as will the ventilators that provide oxygen to patients whose lungs are besieged by the virus.

    The logical extrapolation of the piecemeal efforts of the US federal and state health organizations is that they’ll end up in the ‘whack a mole scenario” described in the article. Once NY state starts to level off, Louisana’s cases will explode because they didn’t want to cancel Mardi Gras, then Florida’s Spring breakers then the next state and the next. A few months later, if they reopen North America to international travel, they’ll re-import more cases whether it’s from Africa or Brazil or India. It’s like billard balls all crashing around the world re-igniting hotspots everywhere they stop.

    Without vigorous and effective testing, it’s like the US is playing hockey without a goalie. Without the contact tracing after they’ve identified positive cases, they can’t specifically target quarantines to JUST those directly exposed. It’s like a defenceman trying to pinch off a forechecker while blind. Without PPE and having frontline medical staff getting sickened, it’s like they’ve lost their forwards who can attack and take pressure off the defence. Without all these parts working together, the team effort will always fail no matter how the stars: McDavid or Drai played. At the top, they need unified and coherent leadership that sticks to the plan. Right now, it feels like Peter Chiarelli is running the US pandemic response.

    I feel Canada’s national response has been more like the Ken Holland of pandemic responses. A little slow off the mark but on the right track to finish with a flourish. We could have a contained situation by May and IF the NHL played with just Canadian teams, we could probably do it fairly safely by June. Though they may have to limit attendance at arenas to allow physical spacing between small groups of 2-3 fans per cluster….

    As it is, we’ll probably need to wait for the development of the Covid19 vaccine to be able to allow mass audiences to attend in the US. That will probably push the start of the 2020-21 season into early 2021.

    Don’t get me started on the anti-vaxxers and their crazy theories about Covid19 too…

  43. Ben says:

    I haven’t heard any crazy theories, but I do know the whole corona “virus” thing is a hoax meant to keep us inside while the Chinese install their 5G mind-control network which will upload Soros’ liberal gay agenda directly into our brains.

    Luckily you can protect yourself by taking a few timbits as suppositories (don’t use the sprinkle ones).

  44. Harpers Hair says:

    Just got an email from Rogers letting me know my Sportsnet Now subscription will be extended 60 days at no charge.

    Classy move.

  45. N64 says:

    v4ance: Without vigorous and effective testing, it’s like the US is playing hockey without a goalie.

    Without a goaler they really need some Rickibox D

    v4ance: As it is, we’ll probably need to wait for the development of the Covid19 vaccine to be able to allow mass audiences to attend

    Every place everywhere in the world that overruns hospital ICUs will go to ground without leadership. But leadership can mean easier peak and quicker recovery.

    The measures needed to reduce the peak will also be needed afterwards. Even if cases drop fast after peak return to job sites is not sustainable with out the same measures needed before. If everything else is in place even 1 month dosages of bio-engineered antibody treatments would also be a huge tipping point.

  46. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM:
    Pronman said he doesn’t think Rasanen warrants an NHL contract.

    Rasanen has a tough 2018/19 season (as did the entire team) but did have a solid bounce-back season this past year.

    Taking away the recent news, he had a year left at BC so a decision on his signing wouldn’t have to be made until after next season (August 15, 2021).

    There was time and I assume this signing doesn’t mean the Oilers will lose his rights before the end of the 2020/21 season (if there is one).

    While I have been a fan of this player since I saw him be the “all-situations guy” for Team Finland at the World Juniors, he is definitely a long shot to ever play an NHL. At the same time, at least to me, assuming standard development in his “senior year”, I think he would be a solid guy to add to the Condors even if an NHL career is unlikely (as it is with lots of guys they sign – Logan Day, Jake Kulevich, etc.).

  47. N64 says:

    The UK was on that course. They looked at their extent of spread and decided they were past the point that had any chance of not crushing their hospitals 10 fold.

    If they are doing all of the other stuff at Singapore or Taiwan levels it’s not impossible, but the most likely outcome is they change course like the UK a few weeks below peak.

  48. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM:
    Looking for McLeod, Maksimov and Samorukov to earn more responsibilities in Bakersfield and boost their production in the coming season. The sophomore year is critical for B-level prospects.

    For sure and I think that has always been “the plan”.

    I was fairly express that I anticipated the two forwards to struggle early in their rookie pro seasons but to earn more offensive opportunities and power play time in the 2nd half. I would say that McLeod actually had a very strong year on the whole (his 5 on 5 production among the best on the team) but Maksi didn’t progress as I had hoped.

    Sammy was having a decent year but injuries slowed him down.

    Absolutely, the two wingers should both be in the top 6 and the PP and Sammy in the top 4.

    I think Lavoie starts further up the lineup than Maksi did.

  49. N64 says:

    Did not take long to start moving. First move is similar to first move when UK changed course:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-27/sweden-to-impose-50-person-limit-on-public-gatherings

  50. OriginalPouzar says:

    Rickety Cricket:
    Brogan Rafferty is officially better than actual NHL players. Folks, you really cannot make this stuff up!

    and would cost more than Evan Bouchard in a trade (and Klefbom and Bear).

  51. OriginalPouzar says:

    defmn: Actually, I believe somebody around here
    did.

    It’s just that Vancouver was playing so well with a secure hold on a playoff spot they decided they didn’t need him for the stretch run.

    Well, when a team has the likes of Briesbois and Suatner to call up before a guy like Rafferty, its tough depth to power through.

  52. pts2pndr says:

    It wii be interesting to see how much was learned. I do believe it will be harder for Seattle than it was for Vegas. The effect the virus will have on the salary cap and the possibility of compliance buyouts will throw in another twist. If they allow compliance buyouts it will add a number of NHL veterans for Seattle to pick from that were bought out due cap hit but valuable for mentorship and veteran leadership. When we get this pandemic under control there should be some very interesting times in sports economics and life in general. Could see a shift in societal values added into the mix as well.

  53. OriginalPouzar says:

    Rickety Cricket:
    OriginalPouzar,

    OP, I wanted to thank you for your provacative questions last night. Amazing! Well done!

    I honestly can’t figure out if the responses were actually truthful or posted to encite (which I believe is the definition of a troll – a word I generally don’t use).

  54. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM: Goaltending, too. Running two rookies and an injured starter didn’t help anything at all.

    Losing Starrett so early in the season for term was a killer – by the time he was actually healthy, the team itself was absolutely gutted.

  55. OriginalPouzar says:

    Ben:
    Do we yet have confirmation of Seattle expansion draft rules?

    I wonder if they tweak it seeing as Vegreville was able to run a get-rich-quick scheme on GMs desperate to protect mediocre players.

    The NHL has said that, essentially, they will mirror what was done for Vegas.

  56. pts2pndr says:

    We live in a country where the best outside months are July and August. With playing golf, paddle boarding and music festival activities etc about the last place I want to be is inside watching hockey. Put an asterisk on 2019/2020 and let the teams gear up for the new season. Anything else is asking for a diminished product for the coming season. We need to move on. When safe we need to celebrate and reconnect. As much as I am a fan I am not crazy about playoffs going as late as they do now. A number of posters are for a shorter season. I hope that common sense prevails. I love summer and what it brings. Hockey and summer for me are diametrically opposed.

  57. defmn says:

    OriginalPouzar: The NHL has said that, essentially, they will mirror what was done for Vegas.

    As they should. It isn’t like Seattle didn’t pay full retail for the franchise.

    Hopefully they still have the money to pay for it after what is happening.

  58. pts2pndr says:

    The teams and media will figure out the money part to their mutual benefit. They will take a hit as will almost everyone. The key is to brush yourself off and move forward. You can’t change history. Hopefully we will come out of this better for the experience. Reevaluation of values, priorities and with a better understanding of how fragile life and lifestyle can be.

  59. Rickety Cricket says:

    I said in the last thread, I think the comments were intended to raise morale on the blog. It was a classy move by DSF. It was an outlandish claim meant to distract us all from the impending global depression.

  60. Lowetide says:

    no politics please. And thanks.

  61. OriginalPouzar says:

    Harpers Hair:
    CBC News Alerts
    @CBCAlerts
    ·
    6m
    Canadian oil falls below $5 US, after dropping $1.94 on the day. All-time high for Western Canadian Select was in summer of 2008, when it was above $100 US. West Texas Intermediate is trading at $21.23 today after falling $1.33.

    Thank god for the concept of hedging and futures – should protect most mid-cap and juniors for a couple of quarters.

    Of course, the majors don’t hedge….

  62. OriginalPouzar says:

    John Chambers:
    Playoff format:

    If the world can resume in, say, July, I’d like to see the NHL scrap the regular season and jump to a 24-team playoff format.

    Teams 9-16 would playoff against teams 17-24 in a best-of-five. That means Arizona, Chicago, NYR, and Montreal are all in, taking on conference opponents for a chance to compete in the regular playoffs. I believe Calgary would play Winnipeg … it would be exciting as all hell.

    For teams 1-8, all the 1-2 teams would play a series for the Division Championship. Oilers play Vegas, Tampa vs Boston. It serves as a training camp for the top teams and, again, a dream to watch.

    From there we have a regular 16-team playoff based on what shakes out, while the seven teams who didn’t qualify at least get a smaller pool for the draft lottery.

    The draft itself happens in late-July anyway with the now eliminated 15 teams drafting, and the other teams having to be wait until the end of the Stanley Cup tournament to make their 1st round selections.

    I believe it his 16-team playoffs should be seven-game series’ as per usual.

    Dare to dream.

    Draft is in the 4th week of June, not July – free agency is the first week of July.

    The won’t play passed the end of July – of that I’m fairly confidant given the primary objective of a full and “normal” 2020/21 season (which I’m not even sure is do-able to start with).

  63. OriginalPouzar says:

    pts2pndr:
    We live in a country where the best outside months are July and August. With playing golf, paddle boarding and music festival activities etc about the last place I want to be is inside watching hockey. Put an asterisk on 2019/2020 and let the teams gear up for the new season. Anything else is asking for a diminished product for the coming season. We need to move on. When safe we need to celebrate and reconnect. As much as I am a fan I am not crazy about playoffs going as late as they do now. A number of posters are for a shorter season. I hope that common sense prevails. I love summer and what it brings. Hockey and summer for me are diametrically opposed.

    I am 100% on board with putting the kybosh on this season if they can’t get it “done” with integrity by mid to late July but my premise is different than yours.

    At this point, I agree with league and their main objective – ensuring a full and normal 2020/21 is primary as opposed to trying to finish off this year. Of course, both would be ideal but its not looking like that is possible.

    Personally, given this season is already “effed up”, to the extent possible, I’d prefer a normal 2020/21 season or else we are looking at 2 “effed up” seasons in a row.

    —————

    I LOVE summer.

    Summer is so much better than winter and the only good thing about winter is hockey (and, well, making a point of heading to warm places like South America and certain Asian/African destinations).

    The only thing that would make summer better – hockey!

    Yup, there is tons to do outside during the summer but I will always find time to fit the Oilers in and a game is 2.5 hours (subject to amazing entertaining OT).

    I’d take hockey 12 months a year if practicle. The days are super long in this part of the world – lots of time to fit in the Oilers.

  64. Munny says:

    Things China Doesn’t Want You To Know
    @TruthAbtChina 8h

    SUMMARY:

    1. Lockdown in Hubei was lifted 2 days ago and people wanted to go back to work in Jiangxi. Jiangxi police would not let them in. People from Hubei got mad.

    2. Jiangxi police invaded Hubei police jurisdiction, causing fights between the police.

    3. Riots ensued.

    Apparently a police car was overturned and a Jiangxi officer was beaten with his own riot shield. Some videos are still up at the above Twitter address, although the CCP has been doing their best to take them down.

  65. defmn says:

    Munny:
    Things China Doesn’t Want You To Know
    @TruthAbtChina8h

    SUMMARY:


    1. Lockdown in Hubei was lifted 2 days ago and people wanted to go back to work in Jiangxi. Jiangxi police would not let them in. People from Hubei got mad.

    2. Jiangxi police invaded Hubei police jurisdiction, causing fights between the police.

    3. Riots ensued.

    Apparently a police car was overturned and a Jiangxi officer was beaten with his own riot shield.Some videos are still up at the above Twitter address, although the CCP has been doing their best to take the down.

    Saw that earlier today. Wild scene. No idea if it will spread or not but things have got to be tense.

  66. Munny says:

    Updated Alberta numbers:

    56 new cases. 542 total positive tests. 2 fatalities. 23 presently hospitalized. 10 in ICU.

    Only been testing about a 1000 per week this week. Expect to be back at 2000 today, 3000 on the weekend.

  67. Munny says:

    Well, the joy of playoff bearding has been sheared from our lives…

    Should we grow crisis beards in support of our health care teams who are in the playoff of their lives?

    Whaddyathink?

  68. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Thank god for the concept of hedging and futures – should protect most mid-cap and juniors for a couple of quarters.

    Of course, the majors don’t hedge….

    The Alberta government should be buying oil at a slight premium and storing it (If storage is available) and selling it when prices rebound.

    They could make a fortune.

  69. Munny says:

    This guy is using anonymous cellphone location data from X-data and a visualization platform called Tectonix to show where cellphones have travelled since Spring Break, and where Manhattan phones have travelled since the crisis hit NYC…

    Two very short, but cool and scary, videos found here:

    https://twitter.com/MikaelThalen

  70. godot10 says:

    Munny:
    Well, the joy of playoff bearding has been sheared from our lives…

    Should we grow crisis beards in support of our health care teams who are in the playoff of their lives?

    Whaddyathink?

    I’m looking at electric hair clippers on Amazon. I think I may buy one and go with a brush cut look for the pandemic.

  71. Harpers Hair says:

    A chilling story about 21 million cell phone accounts have disappeared in China.

    https://www.ibtimes.sg/china-hiding-covid-19-death-toll-21-million-cell-phones-disappeared-why-41580

  72. ArmchairGM says:

    Harpers Hair: The Alberta government should be buying oil at a slight premium and storing it (If storage is available) and selling it when prices rebound.

    They could make a fortune.

    Every oil tanker in the world will be filled and then remain anchored.

  73. godot10 says:

    Severe Outcomes Among Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) —
    United States, February 12–March 16, 2020

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/pdfs/mm6912e2-H.pdf

    The table at the end is worth looking at.

  74. Munny says:

    Harpers Hair: The Alberta government should be buying oil at a slight premium and storing it (If storage is available) and selling it when prices rebound.

    They could make a fortune.

    How much would the “slight premium” be? A dollar over spot? Two dollars (ie. a “slight premium” of 40 percent)? I doubt this ($7/bbl) would be enough for the industry.

  75. Harpers Hair says:

    Munny: How much would the “slight premium” be?A dollar over spot?Two dollars (ie. a “slight premium” of 40 percent)?I doubt this ($7/bbl) would be enough for the industry.

    I don’t think paying $10/barrel would be too big a risk.

  76. Wilde says:

    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

  77. Wilde says:

    Harpers Hair: The Alberta government should be buying oil at a slight premium and storing it (If storage is available) and selling it when prices rebound.

    They could make a fortune.

    satire?

  78. godot10 says:

    Harpers Hair: I don’t think paying $10/barrel would be too big a risk.

    There is no available Canadian storage.

    Even if there were, it wouldn’t work. The pandemic has killed demand, and the Russians and Saudi’s and the Americans are flooding the market.

    The Canadian price could go to zero unless Canada, the US, and Mexico, NAFTA, places tariffs on imported oil

    The Americans might be willing to put a floating tariff on non-NAFTA oil to the breakeven price of the Permian plus $10.

  79. wolf8888 says:

    what will you watch for those 60 days?

  80. Munny says:

    Kenney was hinting that there was a joint N. American plan coming in today’s presser. Actually, it sounded like a Western Hemisphere plan, because he said “South America” a couple of times,

  81. wolf8888 says:

    summer? in Edmonton? When is that?

  82. wolf8888 says:

    Storage is the problem HH.

  83. oilsnc79 says:

    Wilde:
    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

    That’s beautiful, thanks man..goil

  84. Rickety Cricket says:

    Yamamoto can eat my butt.

    How about you make a fancy video thing of all Elias Pettersson’s goals this season? He is a real hockey player.

  85. Munny says:

    Harpers Hair: I don’t think paying $10/barrel would be too big a risk.

    Okay, so ignoring the impossible storage issue, a “slight premium” of 100 percent.

    I’m scared to ask how big not “too big a risk” is.

    The worst deflationary period the world has seen since The Great Depression has started. If the CBs lose what little control they have left, or if Gov’ts prove too corrupt to deal with this rightly (and judging by the US stimulus bill, they are), it will be worse than the GD.

    There’s more risk of $10/bbl oil than you think. That’s why we over here on the Western side of the blue marble are discussing huge tariffs, which will be justified to the WTO by accusations of “predatory dumping” against the Sauds and Russkies.

    ______

    (There’s also the huge question of whether cheap oil is more of a net benefit to society than expensive oil. Who hasn’t smiled filling the tank this past week? It would be a huge boost to businesses starting up after Covid to be facing much lower energy costs.

    Not to mention all the green energy projects that are suddenly even more economically unviable.

    It’s a tangled up thing.)

  86. godot10 says:

    David Staples gives a timeline summary of the COVID-19 crisis in Canada in today’s Journal.

    https://tinyurl.com/wjc53g7

  87. flyfish1168 says:

    Rickety Cricket:
    Yamamoto can eat my butt.

    How about you make a fancy video thing of all Elias Pettersson’s goals this season? He is a real hockey player.

    Pettersson is a fragile player.

  88. Munny says:

    Wilde:
    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

    The Oilers completed more passes on that first goal than they did in the entire 07-08 season.

  89. Munny says:

    It’s a travesty this only has 10 views.

  90. Harpers Hair says:

    godot10: There is no available Canadian storage.

    Even if there were, it wouldn’t work.The pandemic has killed demand, and the Russians and Saudi’sand the Americans are flooding the market.

    The Canadian price could go to zero unless Canada, the US, and Mexico, NAFTA, places tariffs on imported oil

    The Americans might be willing to put a floating tariff on non-NAFTA oil to the breakeven price of the Permian plus $10.

    Not true.

    There are massive salt caverns in Eastern Alberta that could be used for storing oil.

    https://canada.constructconnect.com/joc/news/technology/2015/01/salt-caverns-in-eastern-alberta-created-to-store-energy-1005431w

    http://www.pembina.com/Pembina/media/Pembina/PDFs/Making%20Connections%20Newsletters/2013-Spring-Making-Connections-Newsletter.pdf

  91. Harpers Hair says:

    Wilde: satire?

    Not at all.

    Alberta and U.S. producers could pro-actively fight back against the Saudi/Russian oil war.

  92. northerndancer says:

    Wilde:
    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

    Holy F Wilde! Thank you for putting this together. What a collective display of skills (each with different strengths), drive and vision. Wow. I gotta say it is so nice to see Nuge with decent players for once, instead of being the only one on a line with skill and responsibility. Beautiful hockey. What a handful they will be for the foreseeable future.

  93. Lowetide says:

    Please no politics, you can start your own blog for that purpose. Please and thanks.

  94. Harpers Hair says:

    flyfish1168: Pettersson is a fragile player.

    Fragile Pettersson, who was drafted in the same draft as Yamamoto, has scored 132 points in 139 GP.

    Tiny Kailer has scored 31 points in 53GP.

    In a re-draft, one of these players would be selected first overall and the other wouldn’t.

  95. Halfwise says:

    Well that for sure is an argument worth winning.

  96. Harpers Hair says:

    Halfwise:
    Well that for sure is an argument worth winning.

    The argument is over..

  97. OriginalPouzar says:

    Well that was a strawman argument if I’ve ever seen one….

    Of note, Yamamoto, 3rd in the NHL among forwards in P/60, Pettersson 21st.

    Pettersson would definitely be 1st-3rd in a re-draft.

    Yamamoto would move up to around 10th or so I would think.

  98. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Well that was a strawman argument if I’ve ever seen one….

    Of note, Yamamoto, 3rd in the NHL among forwards in P/60, Pettersson 21st.

    Pettersson would definitely be 1st-3rd in a re-draft.

    Yamamoto would move up to around 10th or so I would think.

    Small sample sizes are such a crutch.

  99. Halfwise says:

    And was it worth it?

  100. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Harpers Hair:
    A chilling story about 21 million cell phone accounts have disappeared in China.

    https://www.ibtimes.sg/china-hiding-covid-19-death-toll-21-million-cell-phones-disappeared-why-41580

    Much of this is fiction. The health App is not mandatory, it is more a convenience if you are travelling from one region to another, where you will have to get your temperature taken to continue your travels. If you have the App it serves as proof that you are healthy.

    No idea about cell phones, unless they are linked to deaths by natural causes (old age) there is a massive elderly population in China and if my math is correct, there are 100,000,000+ deaths in China every year, that could explain some of this, along with the number of people including students and foreigners/companies who left China.

    There are far too many cell phones (cameras) and many people know how to use VPN to get around Gov’t censures that if there was that number of people missing/dying, it would have leaked out by now.

    As well, there are massive numbers of Chinese migrant workers (who have 2 cellphones) and the story does allude to this as well.

    For the most part China is no different than here, but there a few pockets of places where sketchy stuff goes on, but not a lot of that takes place in the larger centers, like Wuhan.

    Speaking of Wuhan, travel there is still restricted currently, but it is supposed to be relaxed on 8 April (not clear what that will look like yet).

  101. Rickety Cricket says:

    Harpers Hair: Small sample sizes are such a crutch.

    Borgan Rafferty shits on small sample sizes!

  102. defmn says:

    Wilde:
    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

    Just wanted to thank you for that. Incredible skill and chemistry with that line.

  103. OriginalPouzar says:

    Harpers Hair: Small sample sizes are such a crutch.

    My post was tongue in cheek as noone thinks that Yamamoto is better than Pettersson and noone argued that.

    As an aside, what’s the sample size that you base your opinion that Rafferty is more valuable than each of Bouchard, Bear and Klefbom?

  104. v4ance says:

    https://www.reuters.com/article/basketball-nba-resume-nofans-coronavirus-idUSKBN21E3CO?taid=5e7eaeee5ef3770001784f8d

    If the NBA regular season resumes, it is almost “100 percent” the games will be played without fans present, ESPN’s Brian Windhorst reported Friday.

    Windhorst said the NBA will very likely mimic the plan being used in China for a potential end to the current hiatus, which began March 12. In China, ground zero for the coronavirus in recent weeks, the plan for professional basketball to resume includes keeping players in a centralized, isolated location or shared hotel to limit the chance they come in contact with any infected person.

    “If LeBron James wants to play for a championship this year he is going to have to reset his expectations,” Windhorst said. “That’s what China is looking at — clustering teams in a bubble where they can be protected. LeBron is the voice of the rest of the league. He’s speaking with emotion the way he sees it.

    “The reality is, if the NBA comes back, at least in the short term, it’s going to be in empty arenas or empty aircraft hangars where they just put down a court. … That’s something players are going to have to start getting their minds around.”

    ***

    So if Canada can contain the coronavirus at a much faster pace than the US… (highly likely) then Canada hosting all the NHL playoff teams doesn’t seem like much of a stretch.

    The Quebec City hosted Lightning versus the St. John’s Bruins in the east with the Saskatoon Blues taking on the Edmonton Oilers in the west. A little bit of karma in action there since the Blues almost moved to Saskatchewan

  105. godot10 says:

    So if Canada can contain the coronavirus at a much faster pace than the US… (highly likely) then Canada hosting all the NHL playoff teams doesn’t seem like much of a stretch.

    At this point, both Canada and the United States are failing to contain CoVid-19. One shouldn’t count chickens before they hatch. Success against the virus is not measured relatively.

    Your supposition is entirely hypothetical at this point.

    Canada’s case curves look nothing like Taiwan or Singapore.

  106. €√¥£€^$ says:

    Fantastic! I wish I knew how to do this…..

  107. tileguy says:

    I bet they could hold the games in arenas and have one paying customer per section. The cost of that ticket would be $100,000.
    Oh yah, beer and hotdog $10,000.

  108. OriginalPouzar says:

    The NHL is driven by gate revenue and can’t get by on empty stadiums like the NBA could potentially.

  109. JimmyV1965 says:

    Harpers Hair: Fragile Pettersson, who was drafted in the same draft as Yamamoto,has scored 132 points in 139 GP.

    Tiny Kailer has scored 31 points in 53GP.

    In a re-draft, one of these players would be selected first overall and the other wouldn’t.

    I really doubt the Stars would trade Heiskanen for Petterssen. They gush over this kid in Dallas. Rating the best player in that draft is much more debatable than you think.

  110. v4ance says:

    Think of all the fun Canada could have hosting the playoffs!

    The Hamilton Predators? Take that Balsille!
    The Ottawa Capitals. The Rimouski Penguins.The Fredricton Flyers. The Whistler Avalanche (though playing in Vancouver). The Regina Stars…

    The Stanley Cup played in Toronto as a “neutral site” to maximize gate revenues

  111. jp says:

    Wilde:
    Hi folks yesterday I spent the morning grabbing the tape of all 28 Nugent-Hopkins – Draisaitl – Yamamoto line goals and putting them in a thread on Twitter, managed to fit them into better-than-Twitter quality streamable to share so here’s that

    https://streamable.com/75uil

    That’s some seriously beautiful hockey. Thanks!

  112. jp says:

    godot10: At this point, both Canada and the United States are failing to contain CoVid-19. One shouldn’t count chickens before they hatch. Success against the virus is not measured relatively.

    Your supposition is entirely hypothetical at this point
    Canada’s case curves look nothing like Taiwan or Singapore.

    This is definitely true, to an extent.

    Canada absolutely does appear to be doing a better job than the US. But the Canadian case and death numbers need to be multiplied by 10 for a fair comparison. Better for sure, but not so much better that Canada should be feeling really good about itself. (I’m a Canadian living in the US so the we/they feels weird right now).

    Anyway, I strongly endorse Godot’s don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched sentiment.

  113. Munny says:

    What would it take to get Scott Laughton out of Philly?

    He takes the 4th most FOs on The Flyers… He’s 60.2 percent in the Dzone, and 62.5 percent on the PK. He was on pace for a 16-18-33 type season over 82 games played.

    He turns 26 on May 30, is 6′ 01″ 190lbs, has a motor that doesn’t quit when on the ice, and his favourite player to get under-the-skin-of is Brady Tkachuk… we can offer him a better Turtle target.

    Was QO’ed by Philly last summer at a cap hit of $2.3M. The contract has one more year to run. Philly had to use LTIR this past year to remain cap compliant, but have no major signings this summer. That said, they will need to divest salary if they want to play in the UFA market. They have some older players on expiring contracts that will need to be replaced.

    They need RD and scoring wingers. Not sure there’s a match, but he’s a player I would take a run at. He’s pretty much a 4C there and making over $2M a year. Find a way.

  114. flyfish1168 says:

    Harpers Hair: Fragile Pettersson, who was drafted in the same draft as Yamamoto,has scored 132 points in 139 GP.

    Tiny Kailer has scored 31 points in 53GP.

    In a re-draft, one of these players would be selected first overall and the other wouldn’t.

    Fragile doesn’t mean he is unskilled, not a good or better player. Fragile means broken or damaged. I’m using in the context he is a soft player easily damaged which equals injury.

  115. v4ance says:

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/mar/28/trump-coronavirus-politics-us-health-disaster

    The missing six weeks: how Trump failed the biggest test of his life

    When the definitive history of the coronavirus pandemic is written, the date 20 January 2020 is certain to feature prominently. It was on that day that a 35-year-old man in Washington state, recently returned from visiting family in Wuhan in China, became the first person in the US to be diagnosed with the virus.

    On the very same day, 5,000 miles away in Asia, the first confirmed case of Covid-19 was reported in South Korea. The confluence was striking, but there the similarities ended.

    In the two months since that fateful day, the responses to coronavirus displayed by the US and South Korea have been polar opposites.

    One country acted swiftly and aggressively to detect and isolate the virus, and by doing so has largely contained the crisis. The other country dithered and procrastinated, became mired in chaos and confusion, was distracted by the individual whims of its leader, and is now confronted by a health emergency of daunting proportions.

    Within a week of its first confirmed case, South Korea’s disease control agency had summoned 20 private companies to the medical equivalent of a war-planning summit and told them to develop a test for the virus at lightning speed. A week after that, the first diagnostic test was approved and went into battle, identifying infected individuals who could then be quarantined to halt the advance of the disease.

    Some 357,896 tests later, the country has more or less won the coronavirus war. On Friday only 91 new cases were reported in a country of more than 50 million.

    The US response tells a different story. Two days after the first diagnosis in Washington state, Donald Trump went on air on CNBC and bragged: “We have it totally under control. It’s one person coming from China. It’s going to be just fine.”

    ‘A fiasco of incredible proportions’

    A week after that, the Wall Street Journal published an opinion article by two former top health policy officials within the Trump administration under the headline Act Now to Prevent an American Epidemic. Luciana Borio and Scott Gottlieb laid out a menu of what had to be done instantly to avert a massive health disaster.

    Top of their to-do list: work with private industry to develop an “easy-to-use, rapid diagnostic test” – in other words, just what South Korea was doing.

    It was not until 29 February, more than a month after the Journal article and almost six weeks after the first case of coronavirus was confirmed in the country that the Trump administration put that advice into practice. Laboratories and hospitals would finally be allowed to conduct their own Covid-19 tests to speed up the process.

    Today, 86,012 cases have been confirmed in the US, pushing the nation to the top of the world’s coronavirus league table

    Those missing four to six weeks are likely to go down in the definitive history as a cautionary tale of the potentially devastating consequences of failed political leadership. Today, 86,012 cases have been confirmed across the US, pushing the nation to the top of the world’s coronavirus league table – above even China.

  116. v4ance says:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/27/a-letter-to-the-uk-from-italy-this-is-what-we-know-about-your-future

    A letter to the UK from Italy: this is what we know about your future

    The acclaimed Italian novelist Francesca Melandri, who has been under lockdown in Rome for almost three weeks due to the Covid-19 outbreak, has written a letter to fellow Europeans “from your future”, laying out the range of emotions people are likely to go through over the coming weeks.

    I am writing to you from Italy, which means I am writing from your future. We are now where you will be in a few days. The epidemic’s charts show us all entwined in a parallel dance.

    We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us. We watch you as you behave just as we did. You hold the same arguments we did until a short time ago, between those who still say “it’s only a flu, why all the fuss?” and those who have already understood.

    As we watch you from here, from your future, we know that many of you, as you were told to lock yourselves up into your homes, quoted Orwell, some even Hobbes. But soon you’ll be too busy for that.

    First of all, you’ll eat. Not just because it will be one of the few last things that you can still do.

    You’ll find dozens of social networking groups with tutorials on how to spend your free time in fruitful ways. You will join them all, then ignore them completely after a few days.

    You’ll pull apocalyptic literature out of your bookshelves, but will soon find you don’t really feel like reading any of it.

    You’ll eat again. You will not sleep well. You will ask yourselves what is happening to democracy.

    You’ll have an unstoppable online social life – on Messenger, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom…

    You will miss your adult children like you never have before; the realisation that you have no idea when you will ever see them again will hit you like a punch in the chest.

    Old resentments and falling-outs will seem irrelevant. You will call people you had sworn never to talk to ever again, so as to ask them: “How are you doing?” Many women will be beaten in their homes.

    You will wonder what is happening to all those who can’t stay home because they don’t have one. You will feel vulnerable when going out shopping in the deserted streets, especially if you are a woman. You will ask yourselves if this is how societies collapse. Does it really happen so fast? You’ll block out these thoughts and when you get back home you’ll eat again.

    You will put on weight. You’ll look for online fitness training.

    You’ll laugh. You’ll laugh a lot. You’ll flaunt a gallows humour you never had before. Even people who’ve always taken everything dead seriously will contemplate the absurdity of life, of the universe and of it all.

    You will make appointments in the supermarket queues with your friends and lovers, so as to briefly see them in person, all the while abiding by the social distancing rules.

    You will count all the things you do not need.

    The true nature of the people around you will be revealed with total clarity. You will have confirmations and surprises.

    Literati who had been omnipresent in the news will disappear, their opinions suddenly irrelevant; some will take refuge in rationalisations which will be so totally lacking in empathy that people will stop listening to them. People whom you had overlooked, instead, will turn out to be reassuring, generous, reliable, pragmatic and clairvoyant.

    Those who invite you to see all this mess as an opportunity for planetary renewal will help you to put things in a larger perspective. You will also find them terribly annoying: nice, the planet is breathing better because of the halved CO2 emissions, but how will you pay your bills next month?

    You will not understand if witnessing the birth of a new world is more a grandiose or a miserable affair.

    You will play music from your windows and lawns. When you saw us singing opera from our balconies, you thought “ah, those Italians”. But we know you will sing uplifting songs to each other too. And when you blast I Will Survive from your windows, we’ll watch you and nod just like the people of Wuhan, who sung from their windows in February, nodded while watching us.

    Many of you will fall asleep vowing that the very first thing you’ll do as soon as lockdown is over is file for divorce.

    Many children will be conceived.

    Your children will be schooled online. They’ll be horrible nuisances; they’ll give you joy.

    Elderly people will disobey you like rowdy teenagers: you’ll have to fight with them in order to forbid them from going out, to get infected and die.

    You will try not to think about the lonely deaths inside the ICU.

    You’ll want to cover with rose petals all medical workers’ steps.

    You will be told that society is united in a communal effort, that you are all in the same boat. It will be true. This experience will change for good how you perceive yourself as an individual part of a larger whole.

    Class, however, will make all the difference. Being locked up in a house with a pretty garden or in an overcrowded housing project will not be the same. Nor is being able to keep on working from home or seeing your job disappear. That boat in which you’ll be sailing in order to defeat the epidemic will not look the same to everyone nor is it actually the same for everyone: it never was.

    At some point, you will realise it’s tough. You will be afraid. You will share your fear with your dear ones, or you will keep it to yourselves so as not to burden them with it too.

    You will eat again.

    We’re in Italy, and this is what we know about your future. But it’s just small-scale fortune-telling. We are very low-key seers.

    If we turn our gaze to the more distant future, the future which is unknown both to you and to us too, we can only tell you this: when all of this is over, the world won’t be the same.

    © Francesca Melandri 2020

  117. godot10 says:

    v4ance:
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/mar/28/trump-coronavirus-politics-us-health-disaster

    The missing six weeks: how Trump failed the biggest test of his life

    When the definitive history of the coronavirus pandemic is written, the date 20 January 2020 is certain to feature prominently. It was on that day that a 35-year-old man in Washington state, recently returned from visiting family in Wuhan in China, became the first person in the US to be diagnosed with the virus.


    On the very same day, 5,000 miles away in Asia, the first confirmed case of Covid-19 was reported in South Korea. The confluence was striking, but there the similarities ended.

    In the two months since that fateful day, the responses to coronavirus displayed by the US and South Korea have been polar opposites.

    One country acted swiftly and aggressively to detect and isolate the virus, and by doing so has largely contained the crisis. The other country dithered and procrastinated, became mired in chaos and confusion, was distracted by the individual whims of its leader, and is now confronted by a health emergency of daunting proportions.

    Within a week of its first confirmed case, South Korea’s disease control agency had summoned 20 private companies to the medical equivalent of a war-planning summit and told them to develop a test for the virus at lightning speed. A week after that, the first diagnostic test was approved and went into battle, identifying infected individuals who could then be quarantined to halt the advance of the disease.

    Some 357,896 tests later, the country has more or less won the coronavirus war. On Friday only 91 new cases were reported in a country of more than 50 million.

    The US response tells a different story. Two days after the first diagnosis in Washington state, Donald Trump went on air on CNBC and bragged: “We have it totally under control. It’s one person coming from China. It’s going to be just fine.”

    ‘A fiasco of incredible proportions’

    A week after that, the Wall Street Journal published an opinion article by two former top health policy officials within the Trump administration under the headline Act Now to Prevent an American Epidemic. Luciana Borio and Scott Gottlieb laid out a menu of what had to be done instantly to avert a massive health disaster.

    Top of their to-do list: work with private industry to develop an “easy-to-use, rapid diagnostic test” – in other words, just what South Korea was doing.

    It was not until 29 February, more than a month after the Journal article and almost six weeks after the first case of coronavirus was confirmed in the country that the Trump administration put that advice into practice. Laboratories and hospitals would finally be allowed to conduct their own Covid-19 tests to speed up the process.

    Today, 86,012 cases have been confirmed in the US, pushing the nation to the top of the world’s coronavirus league table

    Those missing four to six weeks are likely to go down in the definitive history as a cautionary tale of the potentially devastating consequences of failed political leadership. Today, 86,012 cases have been confirmed across the US, pushing the nation to the top of the world’s coronavirus league table – above even China.

    So how is Canada doing any bettter in an ABSOLUTE sense. Our federal government has similarly wasted six weeks from late January to early March.

    Look at David Staples timeline of the crisis in the Edmonton Journal. Look at what our federal government was saying and doing every step of the way. Not MATERIALLY different.
    https://tinyurl.com/wjc53g7

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