Back Draft

I drag my draft coverage out over several months for two reasons: I love talking draft and Oilers fans are traditionally ready to talk draft by this time of year and I can run it all the way to June 1 while holding interest.

For me, the math is the thing. I could post my final list when all the games are done. All the games are done. However, the conversation surrounding the draft has a life of its own, and tournaments drive last minutes changes. CHL playoffs and Memorial Cup, the big European tournaments in spring, the combine. All gone. Today, we don’t know when the draft will take place, or when (or if) we’ll see the combine. Where do we go from here?

THE ATHLETIC!

The Athletic Edmonton features a fabulous cluster of stories (some linked below, some on the site). Great perspective from a ridiculous group of writers and analysts. Proud to be part of The Athletic, check it out here.

THE MATH OF THE DRAFT

I pay attention to birth dates and scouting reports that confess to worries about speed. I use NHLE heavily. I also use scouting reports from trusted sources and publications. The 1971 draft was about a lot of things and it captured my imagination (don’t let anyone tell you hockey can’t get caught up in politics). I wondered about Bob Gainey in 1973 and Ron Chipperfield a year later, and I wondered about Alex DeBrincat in his draft year and about Arthur Kaliyev last year. Math doesn’t tell everything but it does say something. It’s saying it again.

These are most of the top forwards by NHLE. My current list (below) is slow playing an inevitable rise up the charts by men like Seth Jarvis and Jan Mysak.

Bob McKenzie’s mid-season list has Seth Jarvis at No. 24, same as my list. I’ll probably have Jarvis top-10 or thereabouts on my final final, suspect he’ll move up a little for McKenzie too. Bottom line is you can look at the NHLE and know where I’m going in the next while in terms of rankings. There might be a late Mysak but it’s less likely due to lack of European tournaments this year.

My plan over the next weeks is to highlight various public resources (Corey Pronman will be next) and it begins today with Scott Weeler.

SCOTT WHEELER

Scott is my guest today on the Lowdown, we’ll talk about the lost combine and the vague draft day, plus the 2020 draft. Wheeler offers a unique perspective on prospects, offering a viewpoint previously unavailable to fans. He uses video to show specific skills (witness his discussion of Lucas Raymond in his mid-season rankings) and drills down on skating issues real or imagined (Quinton Byfield in the same piece) that go beyond fast or slow.

Wheeler represents next level public scouting reports in my opinion, as he offers identifiable skills and weaknesses in players. You don’t have to agree with him, but there is much value in reading him. I think his look at Evan Bouchard gives you a good idea about why Wheeler is a must read every draft year. He also wrote about Ryan McLeod in a piece that foretold the future.

LOWDOWN WITH LOWETIDE

At 10 this morning, TSN 1260, we celebrate what would have been opening day in baseball and talk NHL draft 2020. Scott Wheeler from The Athletic will pop in at 10:20, we’ll chat about the difficulty in scouting this year compared to previous seasons. At 11, Jonah Birenbaum from The Score talks baseball and why you can never have enough arms. 10-1260 text, @Lowetide on twitter. Talk soon!

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119 Responses to "Back Draft"

  1. 12 percent body fat says:

    Jack Quinn in range for oilers. Get this guy.

  2. ArmchairGM says:

    Jarvis or Quinn would be outstanding picks for Edmonton. Not sure either will be around at #20 though.

  3. Todd Macallan says:

    Firmly in the Quinn camp but fear he will be long gone by the Oiler pick. Perreault, Bourque or Jarvis I would be pleased with also.

    LT, I see Zion Nybeck got the Ovi treatment, made the list as LW and RW!

  4. frjohnk says:

    The Oilers 1st round pick of 2020 will be a bust.

    You heard it here first!

  5. frjohnk says:

    If Draisaitl wins the Hart Trophy the Oilers will have drafted 3 players in which all 3 players were current NHLers when all 3 won the Hart.

    No other team has had these riches. Pittsburgh is the closest with Jagr, Lemieux and Crosby. But Lemieux retired 1 year before Crosby won.

  6. ArmchairGM says:

    The Draft Analyst LOVES Jarvis, ranking him 11th and giving him a glowing report:

    “A slick and cerebral forward with excellent hands, Jarvis has all the tools required to be a dominant player in major junior. He can dish the puck with flair but also play the role of a sniper thanks to an excellent shot and release. Jarvis keeps his feet moving at all times and tracks the puck like a hawk, and when he takes control of it, he’ll button-hook or curl to change the plane of attack and improve his angle. Compounding issues for defenders is his strong balance, as Jarvis darts inside with consistency and doesn’t seem deterred by traffic or a potential double team. He also provides his coaching staff with the necessary intangibles to contribute in other areas such as special teams, and he communicates well with his linemates while trying to execute set plays.

    There’s a ton of finesse to Jarvis’s game. Not only is he a silky-smooth skater with grace and fluidity, but he can also unleash a quick first step and accelerate into open ice as if he were shot out of a cannon. Jarvis is as elusive and slippery as they come during attempts to bypass the neutral zone, and his agility helps him drop rapid directional changes to the inside or out. He may not be listed as a power forward, but Jarvis is well balanced and fearless when attacking the net at full speed and seems to have the utmost confidence in his ability to gain the zone and create scoring chances. One of the major advantages Jarvis’s speed gives him is the ability to keep defenders well off the line, thus giving him room to either stickhandle closer to the goal or wire a heavy wrister aimed at the upper half of the net. Jarvis is a deadly-accurate shooter via the wrist shot and he does not require optimal or standard conditions to blister the puck off a quick release; corralling bouncing pucks is not a problem.

    Jarvis is a highly-intelligent forward who properly times his movements away from the puck in order to get open for a clean look at the net His poise under pressure allows him to receive passes in congested danger areas where he can unload a shot towards the net or delay for that critical split second that fakes the goalie well out of position. Jarvis’s hands and puck control already are at an elite level, and few in this draft are as clean and capable at executing near-perfect odd-man rushes as he can. His passing skills are excellent, not only for his vision and accuracy but also for the methods he uses to deliver the puck on the tape. Jarvis is beyond capable in making plays on his backhand.

    Versatility is the first thing that comes to mind when analyzing the intangibles Jarvis can bring. Not only is he deployed as either a center or wing, but Jarvis also plays the point on the power play and is used as a primary penalty killer. He brings a great attitude to the ice and shows a lot of enthusiasm towards his teammates’ successes.”

    https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-c-w-seth-jarvis/

  7. ArmchairGM says:

    They have Jack Quinn ranked 21, so may that’s more obtainable for Edmonton:

    “One of the better two-way players among draft-eligible wingers, Jack Quinn is a goal-scoring machine who in his first year of eligibility placed second in the OHL with 52 tallies, including 15 on the power play and another three while shorthanded. Although he had the benefit of sharing the same ice on the power play with a superior playmaking center like Marco Rossi for a good chunk of the season, Quinn distinguished himself as a low-maintenance threat capable of creating his own shot or setting up his linemates for their own prime chances at the net.

    The knee-jerk response to Quinn’s rise in draft circles is to tie his production to playing on Rossi’s wing. But Quinn clearly does the work required to get himself into scoring position, and you can’t fault him for making the most of his opportunites. Quinn has the potential to drive his own line as a winger because he’s so good in the corners or along the boards, plus his escapability for an above-average skater is a tribute to his poise and the timing of his lateral cuts immediately after of zone entries. Playing a cerebral, poised, and calculated game from the flank while making smart decision after smart decision is the best explanation I can come up with for the manner in which he toyed with OHL defenders and goalies; even in a season where goal scoring skyrocketed from previous campaigns.

    Some view Quinn as a fast skater, but it’s his agility and elusiveness that create bigger problems for opponents rather than straight-line speed. The OHL this season seemed awash with passive defenders, lazy backchecking, over-anxious goalies, and a lot of puck gazing, so assessing any prospect’s balance into traffic or forays into the opposing zone at top speed becomes tricky. Nonetheless, Quinn should be credited for using his speed to take a defender to the woodshed — outside or inside — and playing with high levels of confidence and fearlessness into the mass of bodies despite having a relatively thin frame. Quinn is a tough competitor who is willing to fight for pucks and handle the disc in tight spaces. Defenders who try to contain or fix him into the corner run the risk of getting their ankles broken, but they also have to respect Quinn’s elite shot-release combination, to include his backhander.

    Quinn’s positioning is as close to impeccable as it can get for a teenage winger. The puck seems to gravitate towards him and for good reason — his timing, anticipation and quick first step lead to loose pucks being collected while opponents are still digging for a puck that is not longer there. Quinn plays with aggressiveness and is willing to take risks, but making snap decisions with time at a premium seemed to yield a high success rate. If a window closes, Quinn is smart enough to peel back and recalculate, utilizing his point men of a backdoor trailer with a perfect tape-to-tape pass. Quinn definitely has a playmaking gene, but he also seemed to grasp his role while playing with Rossi which was to get open and sling pucks on net.

    The intangibles are plentiful. Quinn will throw bodychecks, stick up for teammates after the whistle, battle hard for low-slot positioning against bigger defenders, and he is one of the league’s craftiest penalty killers in terms of looting pucks and creating scoring chances out of one-on-one scenarios. Pound for pound, Quinn’s draft season was practically storybook, and it’s easy to understand why so many are in love with his game.”

    https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-rw-jack-quinn/

  8. jtblack says:

    frjohnk:
    If Draisaitl wins the Hart Trophy the Oilers will have drafted 3 players in which all 3 players were current NHLers when all 3 won the Hart.

    No other team has had these riches.Pittsburgh is the closest with Jagr, Lemieux and Crosby.But Lemieux retired 1 year before Crosby won.

    this is confusing???

  9. ArmchairGM says:

    Todd Macallan: Firmly in the Quinn camp but fear he will be long gone by the Oiler pick. Perreault, Bourque or Jarvis I would be pleased with also.

    RC has long been an area of weakness with this org. There are several available in the 2020 draft that may be available when the Oilers pick:

    Seth Jarvis – https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-c-w-seth-jarvis/
    Mavrik Bourque – https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-c-mavrik-bourque/
    Dawson Mercer – https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-c-w-dawson-mercer/
    Jean-Luc Foudy – https://www.ontheforecheck.com/2020/2/10/21112891/2020-nhl-entry-draft-profile-jean-luc-foudy-center-forward-windsor-spitfires

    Foudy is likely a 2nd round pick though – we’ll see if Holland trades for more picks or whether he just goes with what he has.

  10. jtblack says:

    Oilers current picks:

    1 – #23
    2 –
    3 – #85
    4-
    5 – #147
    6 – #178
    7 – #210

    So currently not a lot of opportunity for the scouts. I think we all hope / believe that JP will return at least 1 – 2nd rounder …. wonder if KH could get a 2nd & a 4th for JP? That would give the scouts a full slate ..

  11. ArmchairGM says:

    12 percent body fat:
    Jack Quinn in range for oilers. Get this guy.

    Todd Macallan:
    Firmly in the Quinn camp but fear he will be long gone by the Oiler pick. Perreault, Bourque or Jarvis I would be pleased with also.

    LT, I see Zion Nybeck got the Ovi treatment, made the list as LW and RW!

    I love Quinn as well. Should we be concerned about balance though? I guess if Puljujarvi is out of the picture that changes things, but the Oilers have spent most of their high picks in recent drafts on RW’s.

    2016 1st round pick: Puljujarvi
    2017 1st round pick: Yamamoto
    2019 2nd round pick: Lavoie

    That’s a lot of draft capital spent on one position. Don’t get me wrong, if Quinn is there I’d seriously consider taking him (BPA and all that), but if there was an equivalent C available (Jarvis / Zary / Bourque) I’d probably lean that way.

  12. ArmchairGM says:

    jtblack:
    Oilers current picks:

    1 – #23
    2 –
    3 – #85
    4-
    5 –#147
    6 –#178
    7 –#210

    So currently not a lot of opportunity for the scouts.I think we all hope / believe that JP will return at least 1 – 2nd rounder …. wonder if KH could get a 2nd & a 4th for JP?That would give the scouts a full slate ..

    If you go by points percentage, Oilers pick 20th.

  13. ArmchairGM says:

    RC Mavrik Bourque is ranked 17th:

    “A highly-skilled playmaker with soft hands with big-play proclivity, Bourque’s creativity and vision are at the forefront of his distinctive style. He utilizes a lot of trickery, such as passes of the no-look, behind-the-back, saucer, and bank variety. What also keeps opponents honest, however, is his goal-scoring ability and explosive shot release. Bourque is the focal point of Shawinigan’s power play, moreso now that Valentin Nussbaumer left for Switzerland, and he can orchestrate the possession from either the half-wall or the point. He is a strong, well-balanced skater who can dangle or toe-drag his way to an improved shooting angle.

    Bourque has a “wow” factor to his game. He may seem methodical in his approach, but you rarely see him rush or force a play without recognizing that the intent behind his decision was sound. At the January CHL Top Prospects Game, Bourque showed off his defensive-zone play, high-compete level and penalty-killing smarts. He was stealing pucks off the backcheck, winning battles along the boards and executing precision timing plays with one arm on his stick during a lengthy cycle in the Team Red end. The same can be said for his play for Team Canada at the August under-18 Ivan Hlinka Tournament, where he kept his motor running on high and created turnovers off the forecheck. He’s good on draws (over 50 percent), and if he sees time on the penalty kill it will usually be towards the end.

    Bourque doesn’t need to put on a show or hog the spotlight to look flashy or impressive — it simply comes out naturally. He likes to remain upright and observe play quite frequently, but he can drop an quick first step from his defensive zone and dart into open ice with a long stride. Although Bourque isn’t overly physical, he is willing to take a hit to complete a play. He’s definitely more of a silent assassin than someone who makes a lot of noise during his shifts, but by the end of the night he’ll have three or four points and at least four or five quality shots on net.”

    https://www.thedraftanalyst.com/2020-nhl-draft/2020-draft-profile-c-mavrik-bourque/

  14. jtblack says:

    ArmchairGM:
    1 – #20
    2 –
    3 – #82
    4-
    5 –#144
    6 –#175
    7 –#207

  15. dustrock says:

    jtblack: this is confusing???

    He means 3 Hart winners, all still active in the NHL (Hall, McDavid, Drai).

  16. OriginalPouzar says:

    The draft is one of my least favorite topic, in particular when we don’t know where the Oilers might be drafting in the first range but, it is what it is and at least its hockey talk.

    I can’t remember exactly where I hear it, it may have been on Lowetide but I think it was on the Gregor Show or maybe Oilers Now (or maybe I read in at The Athletic).

    Anyways, the advise that was given was a person that had talked to two seperate scout contacts – one said there was 23 players and then a sizeable drop off and the other said there were 24 players and a sizeable drop off.

    Obviously there are higher end guys in the top 5 and 10 than 20-24 but it sounds like 23-24 is the range to get a really plus prospect.

    Assuming no playoffs this year (and the Oilers moving down in the draft via playoff success), there is going to be a very good prospect added – we assume it will be a forward and, yes, talented forwards often arrive early so it may just be a couple of years.

  17. OriginalPouzar says:

    Broberg being the exception but the Oilers have trended to the “late birthday” with their higher picks – each of Bouchard, McLeod and Lavoie being a later birthday with only one post draft season needed before AHL eligibility.

    Is that an targeted trend of the organization or just an interesting coincidence of who they drafted?

    Management changed over between some of those picks by K. Gretzky was around for both drafts (although now in a different organizational position).

  18. OilersFuture says:

    ArmchairGM,

    One correction to the scouting report is Quinn did not play 5×5 with Rossi. I’ve been to half a dozen 67’s games this year and he never was on a line with Rossi. Plus, I know enough people that follow Quinn closely, he hasn’t been a bi-product of Rossi at even strength. That said he did play on the PP with him.

    (Quick Edit) – I believe Hoelscher was his center.

  19. Elgin R says:

    As noted by ARMCHAIRGM, the Oilers are 20th if ranked by points %. Assuming the NHL goes with this method for draft ranking, there are some intriguing players in that range.

    Looking at the Oilers pipeline reveals two areas of need; RD and RC. These players have greater trade value vs LD and LC due to scarcity.

    I would draft the best RHD or RC available. In the range as per the LT list are; Braden Schneider (RD), Jean-Luc Foudy (RC), Justin Barron (RD), Seth Jarvis (RC). I would not draft Braden Schneider this high for two reasons; 2001 birthday and plays defence in the Q. My draft order would by Seth Jarvis (WHL Portland), Justin Barron (WHL PA) and then Jean-Luc Foudy (OHL Windsor).

  20. Ben says:

    Not sure why no one ever suggests this, but it would be WAY more entertaining if they did the draft backwards.

    Start with round seven. Scouts urging flyers on fringe players, filling out prospects pools for need, etc.

    As they go *up* in rounds, the drafting gets more intense, with teams going for higher and higher end skill.

    Then you get to the first round and it gets really nuts as the increasingly impact-level players get plucked one by one, leaving only the very top prospects as we get closer to the end.

    Who will go first overall? We’ll have to wait for the very *last* pick of the draft to find out!!

    I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

  21. Jordan says:

    So, I hear that there are a lot of people who come by here looking for ideas for pieces to write about.

    I want to see a retrospective of the last 20 years, by draft year, of who the math told us would emerge as an impact player, who did emerge, and who the math told us would emerge, who didn’t.

    I want to know if there are trends about players who are more (or less) likely to emerge based on shared skillset, or other definable trait, and I want to know about the quality of the player that emerged.

    If a player with a 40 pt NHLE plays 500+ games as a 3rd or 4th liner on a team that can’t make the playoffs, I’d call that a miss. But if he was there because he was playing centre behind Leon and Connor, and put up 25 EV points a season, that’s probably still a solid pick. I want the context, to go with the basic analysis of the math.

    I know we’ve talked about this particular idea before there hasn’t been the time to do the research necessary to really dig into each draft year and the players therein.

    Now people have nothing but time.

    If you can build a methodology to do the analysis, and display it coherantly… well I keep hearing that NHL teams are trying to hire those guys.

    Best of luck to you – and hopefully to me when you share it. =D

  22. krakman says:

    Ben:
    Not sure why no one ever suggests this, but it would be WAY more entertaining if they did the draft backwards.

    Start with round seven. Scouts urging flyers on fringe players, filling out prospects pools for need, etc.

    As they go *up* in rounds, the drafting gets more intense, with teams going for higher and higher end skill.

    Then you get to the first round and it gets really nuts as the increasingly impact-level players get plucked one by one, leaving only the very top prospects as we get closer to the end.

    Who will go first overall? We’ll have to wait for the very *last* pick of the draft to find out!!

    I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

    Your round “seven” would just become round “one” with the best players going first like always

  23. defmn says:

    Ben:
    Not sure why no one ever suggests this, but it would be WAY more entertaining if they did the draft backwards.

    Start with round seven. Scouts urging flyers on fringe players, filling out prospects pools for need, etc.

    As they go *up* in rounds, the drafting gets more intense, with teams going for higher and higher end skill.

    Then you get to the first round and it gets really nuts as the increasingly impact-level players get plucked one by one, leaving only the very top prospects as we get closer to the end.

    Who will go first overall? We’ll have to wait for the very *last* pick of the draft to find out!!

    I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

    How would you keep teams from taking the best players in the 7th round. Maybe I am misunderstanding what you mean.

  24. defmn says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Broberg being the exception but the Oilers have trended to the “late birthday” with their higher picks – each of Bouchard, McLeod and Lavoie being a later birthday with only one post draft season needed before AHL eligibility.

    Is that an targeted trend of the organization or just an interesting coincidence of who they drafted?

    Management changed over between some of those picks by K. Gretzky was around for both drafts (although now in a different organizational position).

    I’m not sure if it is coincidence or planned but I can think of two reasons why they might have done this on purpose.

    The first would simply be that the team was so horrible they were in a hurry to re-stock and felt they might gain a season as they rushed one prospect after another into the league too early.

    The other might have to do with on/off conversation about the league wanting to move the draft up to 19 year olds because that extra year of development offers a much clearer picture of potential. Given the Oilers lack of draft success I can see this rationale being pushed by management as a way to mitigate their more obvious mistakes.

  25. N64 says:

    Ben: I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

    I knew I shouldn’t have wired my irony detectors into the fire alarm system. It’s cold out here.

  26. N64 says:

    NHL should do one round per week to keep sport radio open.

  27. jimmers2 says:

    My opinion isn’t exactly an informed one but a 19 year old draft seems like a much better idea for every one (NHL teams, junior teams, development of junior players esp. those from the Jesse P and Yak bin) than the present plan. This is the perfect year to put such a change in place.

    defmn: I’m not sure if it is coincidence or planned but I can think of two reasons why they might have done this on purpose.

    The first would simply be that the team was so horrible they were in ahurry to re-stock and felt they might gain a season as they rushed one prospect after another into the league too early.

    The other might have to do with on/off conversation about the league wanting to move the draft up to 19 year olds because that extra year of development offers a much clearer picture of potential. Given the Oilers lack of draft success I can see this rationale being pushed by management as a way to mitigate their more obvious mistakes.

    • jtblack says:

      I Agree 100%. I did hear that one of the big hurdles is that you “cannot” deny a person who is 18 years old from working …..??

      maybe need the OP lawyer to weigh in on this ..

  28. jp says:

    ArmchairGM,

    dustrock:
    Good stuff, Kournianos is always worth a read.

    These are good reads, thanks.

    Do they ever say a bad word about a player though? These guys are all ranked outside the top 10, there must be a reason (it’s wonderful information, but I don’t feel like I understand the players weaknesses).

  29. jp says:

    Ben:
    Not sure why no one ever suggests this, but it would be WAY more entertaining if they did the draft backwards.

    Start with round seven. Scouts urging flyers on fringe players, filling out prospects pools for need, etc.

    As they go *up* in rounds, the drafting gets more intense, with teams going for higher and higher end skill.

    Then you get to the first round and it gets really nuts as the increasingly impact-level players get plucked one by one, leaving only the very top prospects as we get closer to the end.

    Who will go first overall? We’ll have to wait for the very *last* pick of the draft to find out!!

    I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

    I guess you mean just the TV production shows the draft backwards?

    The main issue I see would be keeping the results under wraps as the whole thing unfolds. The kids are going to post getting drafted on Insta and such.

  30. who says:

    Ben:
    Not sure why no one ever suggests this, but it would be WAY more entertaining if they did the draft backwards.

    Start with round seven. Scouts urging flyers on fringe players, filling out prospects pools for need, etc.

    As they go *up* in rounds, the drafting gets more intense, with teams going for higher and higher end skill.

    Then you get to the first round and it gets really nuts as the increasingly impact-level players get plucked one by one, leaving only the very top prospects as we get closer to the end.

    Who will go first overall? We’ll have to wait for the very *last* pick of the draft to find out!!

    I honestly can’t think of one good reason why they shouldn’t do it this way.

    I don’t think you’ve really thought this through. At all.

  31. who says:

    jtblack:
    I Agree 100%. I did hear that one of the big hurdles is that you “cannot” deny a person who is 18 years old from working …..??

    maybe need the OP lawyer to weigh in on this ..

    No. Please God, No.
    Lol.

  32. ArmchairGM says:

    BONE207:
    I commented on this a couple ofdays ago…
    Looks ripe for the picking here…
    http://www.mynhldraft.com/NHL-Mock-Draft/

    They don’t have Jarvis in the 1st round at all. Wow.

  33. godot10 says:

    The Global Impact of COVID-19 and Strategies for Mitigation and
    Suppression

    https://www.imperial.ac.uk/media/imperial-college/medicine/sph/ide/gida-fellowships/Imperial-College-COVID19-Global-Impact-26-03-2020.pdf

    Worst case scenario:

    We estimate that in the absence of interventions, COVID-19 would have resulted in 7.0 billion
    infections and 40 million deaths globally this year. Mitigation strategiesfocussing on shielding
    the elderly (60% reduction in social contacts) and slowing but not interrupting transmission
    (40% reduction in social contacts for wider population) could reduce this burden by half,
    saving 20 million lives, but we predict that even in this scenario, health systems in all countries
    will be quickly overwhelmed

    Better case scenarios:

    Our analysis therefore suggests that healthcare demand can only be kept within manageable
    levels through the rapid adoption of public health measures (including testing and isolation
    of cases and wider social distancing measures) to suppress transmission, similar to those
    being adopted in many countries at the current time. If a suppression strategy is implemented
    early (at 0.2 deaths per 100,000 population per week) and sustained, then 38.7 million lives
    could be saved whilst if it is initiated when death numbers are higher (1.6 deaths per 100,000
    population per week) then 30.7 million lives could be saved. Delaysin implementing strategies
    to suppress transmission will lead to worse outcomes and fewer lives saved.

    My aside:

    The Canadian federal government has failed us badly on testing. We do not have remotely enough testing capability.

    Social distancing without testing will likely fail badly.

    We also desparately need an antibody test.

    It is critical to know who the asymptomatic carriers are, and who has recovered (without interaction with the health system), so they can begin the reboot of society) i.e. Massive testing for the disease, and massive testing for the antibodies.

    • N64 says:

      ~ I only have one question for a friend. Are the UK authors Pro-trump or Anti-trump? He needs to know that to know whether closures while we ramp up testing and treatment are good for civilization or bad for civilization. #officialline ~

      • TheGreatBigMac says:

        Glad I don’t have his job, being POTUS must suck a lot of the time. Who would want that job. I guess only egotistical pricks and buffoons need apply these days.

  34. ArmchairGM says:

    OilersFuture: One correction to the scouting report is Quinn did not play 5×5 with Rossi. I’ve been to half a dozen 67’s games this year and he never was on a line with Rossi. Plus, I know enough people that follow Quinn closely, he hasn’t been a bi-product of Rossi at even strength. That said he did play on the PP with him.

    (Quick Edit) – I believe Hoelscher was his center.

    Good info – thanks. And to be fair, Kournianos leads with this:

    “Although he had the benefit of sharing the same ice on the power play with a superior playmaking center like Marco Rossi for a good chunk of the season…”

    He does throw in the ambiguous comment about “… Quinn’s rise in draft circles is to tie his production to playing on Rossi’s wing” leaving the reader to assume 5v5 play, but he never actually says that.

    I find it interesting that only 15 of Quinn’s 52 goals came on the PP, and 16 of his 37 assists. With 3 shorties, that means he scored 34 even strength goals in 62 games. That’s damn impressive for a 2nd line forward in his draft year, even if he is a late birthday.

  35. jp says:

    godot10:
    The Global Impact of COVID-19 and Strategies for Mitigation and Suppression

    This is a legit source.

    I should read… but odd to see a projection (without intervention) of 7 billion infected coupled with ‘only’ 40 million deaths. Only a 0.57% death rate, which is lower than any country has seen yet (as far as I know). Especially also when saying those numbers would quickly overwhelm health care systems.

    Only other thing to add is that antibody testing isn’t the only way. To my knowledge PCR based screening is the main method being used currently, it’s more sensitive than an antibody, and should be easily scalable.

    • N64 says:

      That’s IFR. CFR can be very very different. (detail down the thread)

      • jp says:

        South Korea’s number was 0.7% no? (from the earlier wave that’s now basically past). They tested the hell out of anyone remotely connected with the actual cases so I figured that number should be close to IFR (maybe that’s not a fair assumption).

        I’d assume that 0.7% or so would be the baseline and surprised to see a projection come in lower than that despite overwhelming health care systems worldwide. I’ll read the report when I have the time, just explaining what my logic was here.

        No question an antibody based test will be important. I hadn’t thought about detecting recovered cases (and didn’t read Godot carefully enough at the end). PCR testing can detect asymptomatic carriers though (Godot implies, I think, that an antibody test would be needed)

  36. jp says:

    ArmchairGM:
    I find it interesting that only 15 of Quinn’s 52 goals came on the PP, and 16 of his 37 assists. With 3 shorties, that means he scored 34 even strength goals in 62 games. That’s damn impressive for a 2nd line forward in his draft year, even if he is a late birthday.

    That’s very impressive.

  37. Death By Misadventure says:

    Anybody know how deep this draft is?

    Just pondering if due to lack of picks is there value to trade back from the first round and get multiple seconds.

    Otherwise, yes, fully on board with some Jack Quinn, Medicine Man.

  38. defmn says:

    jtblack:
    I Agree 100%. I did hear that one of the big hurdles is that you “cannot” deny a person who is 18 years old from working …..??

    maybe need the OP lawyer to weigh in on this ..

    The draft age of 18 was the result of a court challenge way back when. I can’t remember if it was American or Canadian based but my failing memory seems to recall that it had something to do with the draft age in the U.S.

    I’ve tried to find reference to this on the net on several occasions without luck though so it is just a memory from long ago.

  39. Harpers Hair says:

    who: No. Please God, No.
    Lol.

    Has Speeds approved this?

  40. krakman says:

    defmn,

    NBA changed their draft age to 19 a few years back

  41. defmn says:

    krakman:
    defmn,

    NBA changed their draft age to 19 a few years back

    But was there a court challenge when they did it? There was a particular player who challenged the NHL draft age that caused them to change it.

    EDIT: found it – it was Ken Linseman

    http://www.originalhockeyhalloffame.com/news-events/linseman.html

    “There are of course plenty of exceptions and the teams can take steps to protect a young player, having them stay with a player and their family for example. On the financial side, if a young player is considered ready to play and a team wants to draft him in the first rounds I feel he should have that right. He could have a bad year or get injured staying another year in junior or college and have lost a great financial opportunity. At age 18 we are considered adults and can be drafted into the military or go to jail if we commit a crime. We should have the right to work/play hockey if somebody is willing to pay us.”

  42. Death By Misadventure says:

    OriginalPouzar: Anyways, the advise that was given was a person that had talked to two seperate scout contacts – one said there was 23 players and then a sizeable drop off and the other said there were 24 players and a sizeable drop off.

    OP, thanks for this info.

  43. jtblack says:

    Death By Misadventure: Anybody know how deep this draft is?

    DEEEEEEEEP. Best in a decade outside of 2015 …..

  44. leeinvan says:

    Hopefully they get a 2nd and at least a 3rd for JP, when you think they gave two 2nds for AA and then pretty much stapled him to the 3rd line. JP is at the very least just as valuable and would probably be quite a bit cheaper..

  45. jtblack says:

    leeinvan:
    Hopefully they get a 2nd and at least a 3rd for JP, when you think they gave two 2nds for AA and then pretty much stapled him to the 3rd line. JP is at the very least just as valuable and would probably be quite a bit cheaper..

    But do other GM’s see it that way?

  46. OriginalPouzar says:

    leeinvan:
    Hopefully they get a 2nd and at least a 3rd for JP, when you think they gave two 2nds for AA and then pretty much stapled him to the 3rd line. JP is at the very least just as valuable and would probably be quite a bit cheaper..

    I’m not sure about “stapled to the 3rd line” – yes, his most common linemate was Sheahan at 49 minutes but his second most common was McDavid at 44 minutes.

    I’m also not so sure that GMs would value Puljujarvi more than AA or even as much as him. I think Puljujarvi could still be a solid NHL player but he simply hasn’t accomplished what AA has in this league – sure AA struggled this past year and his 30 goal season is likely an outlier but he’s still averaged 20G per 82 games – Puljujarvi, while much younger, hasn’t accomplished anything like that and does indeed, unfortunately, come with baggage now.

  47. Harpers Hair says:

    Western Canadian Select heavy oil price benchmark fell 30.5 per cent on Thursday to US$6.45 per barrel, which analysts joke is less than a pint of beer. U.S. crude prices fell 7.7 per cent to US$22.60 per barrel.

    https://business.financialpost.com/commodities/canadian-heavy-oil-cheaper-than-a-pint-of-beer-as-north-american-demand-for-fuel-plummets

  48. N64 says:

    jp: South Korea’s number was 0.7% no? (from the earlier wave that’s now basically past)

    Let’s have a drinking game. One shot every time we hear that crazy 0.7% CFR for Korea. It was obtained by diving deaths into cases DURING rapid growth when most cases were too new to die!!!

    Current CFR is 1.38%. But wait 27% of cases there 20-29 and 10% were 30-39. That does not reflect Korea’s pop nor the infection age profile anywhere else. It reflects the cult linked to 2/3 of Korea’s case recruiting mostly 20-29 women. So remove half of the excess 20-29 and bang CFR is above 1.5%. So that 0.7% stat that will not die isn’t even telling half the story on CFR.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_South_Korea

    Before going back to the no intervention case how about the late intervention in Wuhan. Same problem with calculating before most cases aren’t new. Go down to cases and deaths for Wuhan and CFR is 5.0%

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Hubei

    Who knows what CFR is without any intervention? People go to ground everywhere at some point if they can.

    Back to the model I don’t know what CFR they have in mind. If 9 out of 10 cases don’t report the 0.57% IFR is 5.7% CFR

      • N64 says:

        Dividing deaths by cases too complicated?

        Dr Fauci:
        “You don’t make the timeline. The virus makes the timeline’,

        No country yet has actually done anything other than shelter when the peak hit. So prattle on. Reality comes anyways.

        And since you love opinion depending on which presidents the writer likes here’s a good one:

        Whether people are locked in their homes via self-quarantine or gasping for air in an ER because they didn’t stay home from work and got infected, they’re no longer meaningfully contributing to the economy. The difference is that the people in the first group are ready to hit the ground running once it’s safe to work again. Some in the second group will also return quickly to the job after they recover, but some will still be too impaired. Some will be dead.

  49. N64 says:

    jp: PCR testing can detect asymptomatic carriers though (Godot implies, I think, that an antibody test would be needed)

    PCR can detect asymptomatic carriers while they carry. But like symptomatic cases the asymptomatic cases recover. So late ramp up of PCR will miss recovered cases whereas antibody serology can arrive late to the game and reveal all.

  50. defmn says:

    Rush hour traffic in downtown Calgary looks about as heavy as a normal Wednesday afternoon in Didsbury.

    Not that I have any real idea what traffic in Didsbury looks like on a Wednesday afternoon. 😉

    • N64 says:

      I’ve seen the Tableau chart for US travel distance reductions. Best states are around 50%

      • jp says:

        Best being the most reduction in traffic?

        I’d be absolutely floored if the reduction in the Boston area is only 50%. I’d guess more like 75%.

        Could be less reduction in rural areas I guess, but rush hour is no longer a thing, even 2 weeks ago.

  51. N64 says:

    godot10: If a suppression strategy is implemented
    early (at 0.2 deaths per 100,000 population per week) and sustained, then 38.7 million lives
    could be saved whilst if it is initiated when death numbers are higher (1.6 deaths per 100,000
    population per week) then 30.7 million lives could be saved

    I’m going to assume they used death as the marker because date of death isn’t guesswork (outside of Monty Python). As per Seattle first death is a good way to estimate how long circulation has been underway.

    NYC reached 0.2 deaths per 100,000 on the 20th, the day of the stay at home order.

    BC reached 0.2 deaths per 100,000 on the 22nd with the 10th death. Suspect that like Seattle that more reflects early transmission in a nursing home. Still concerning if BC testing is backlogged.

  52. Ben says:

    Since no one seemed to like my idea of a backwards draft, here’s an even better scenario.

    The first round involves Central Scouting’s top prospects. But they’re each assigned into the 31 spots randomly.

    Instead of choosing a player, the teams, starting with the last place team and going up, choose a number.

    Only *after* they choose the number is the associated player is revealed. Could be Lafreniere, could be this year’s Alex Plante.

    And here’s the genius part: the next team up can choose either to pick their own number, or *steal a player from another team that’s already picked*, at which point the team losing the player would get to pick again.

    But here’s the genius part: Central Scouting has mixed in 5 unranked players! So after the dust settles those teams could be totally SOL!

    This would clearly be a far cooler way of distributing players.

  53. OriginalPouzar says:

    Member of the Avs has tested positive so that makes three NHLers that we know of.

  54. leadfarmer says:

    Ben:
    Since no one seemed to like my idea of a backwards draft, here’s an even better scenario.

    The first round involves Central Scouting’s top prospects. But they’re each assigned into the 31 spots randomly.

    Instead of choosing a player, the teams, starting with the last place team and going up, choose a number.

    Only *after* they choose the number is the associated player is revealed. Could be Lafreniere, could be this year’s Alex Plante.

    And here’s the genius part: the next team up can choose either to pick their own number, or *steal a player from another team that’s already picked*, at which point the team losing the player would get to pick again.

    But here’s the genius part: Central Scouting has mixed in 5 unranked players! So after the dust settles those teams could be totally SOL!

    This would clearly be a far cooler way of distributing players.

    Why don’t you just throw all the players names into a hat and teams have to draw names. You could get Laferniere in the 6th round!!!

  55. Lowetide says:

    New for The Athletic: Dave Tippett deploys unproven talent expertly in first Oilers season

    https://theathletic.com/1698110/2020/03/26/lowetide-dave-tippett-deploys-unproven-talent-expertly-in-first-oilers-season/

  56. Harpers Hair says:

    Jeff Cox
    @JeffCoxSports
    · 35m
    One somewhat surprising departure for BC is Aapeli Rasanen forgoing his final year of eligibility. Edmonton Oilers draft pick will reportedly head back to his native Finland and sign a pro contract there.

  57. Harpers Hair says:

    defmn:
    Rush hour traffic in downtown Calgary looks about as heavy as a normal Wednesday afternoon in Didsbury.

    Not that I have any real idea what traffic in Didsbury looks like on a Wednesday afternoon.

    Can you imagine what traffic in Didsbury was this afternoon?

    We sit out on our deck in the afternoons here on Vancouver Island and the silence is deafening.

    All you can hear are sea lions bellowing from a mile away.

  58. Harpers Hair says:

    The media pull back is starting to happen:

    CTV News Vancouver
    @CTVVancouver
    ·
    1m
    LISTEN LIVE: As of Thursday evening, CTV News at Six will be simulcast on TSN 1040. That’s in addition to being streamed live on http://CTVNewsVancouver.ca, now available without a login.

  59. OriginalPouzar says:

    Ben:
    To bring parody to the league.

    Yes, these suggestions do scream parody to me. Of course, the league wants parity (and its indeed what we already have).

    • Halfwise says:

      Parody is the relationship between officials and the rule book.

      Parrotty describes most post game questions and answers.

      None of this rhymes with Marody, much to my surprise when I heard his name pronounced by experts.

  60. OriginalPouzar says:

    Harpers Hair:
    Jeff Cox
    @JeffCoxSports· 35m
    One somewhat surprising departure for BC is Aapeli Rasanen forgoing his final year of eligibility. Edmonton Oilers draft pick will reportedly head back to his native Finland and sign a pro contract there.

    Hmmm, interesting – thank you for posting.

    I was thinking Rasanen would be on the radar for a signing after this coming season at BC.

    I’m not sure what this does to the Oilers holding his rights – I assume they are kept through next season….

  61. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Hmmm, interesting – thank you for posting.

    I was thinking Rasanen would be on the radar for a signing after this coming season at BC.

    I’m not sure what this does to the Oilers holding his rights – I assume they are kept through next season….

    The 2016 draft is looking like a complete wipeout for the Oilers.

  62. OriginalPouzar says:

    He’s been a darkhorse of mine since I saw him play such a broad game at the World Juniors a few years back – he was the “everything” for Team Finland – faceoff guy, down a goal, up a goal, net front guy on PP1

  63. OriginalPouzar says:

    Harpers Hair: The 2016 draft is looking like a complete wipeout for the Oilers.

    Its not looking great but the door isn’t closed on much of it:

    – Pulujuarvi – of course, the player will never be 4th overall value nor will we get that in a trade but an asset will likely come back at some point

    – Benson – book is far from closed on this player – he’s a second round pick and they generally need 2-3-4 years post draft – tons of players “make it” in their 21, 22, 23 years

    – Niemelainen may get a contract but it may even be an AHL deal (unlikely to come over on an AHL deal) and, nope, he’s unlikely to ever play in the NHL

    – Berglund remains a prospect of interest and has a solid shot at NHL games this coming season

    – Wells – he’s been passed by Skinner and with Konovalov having one more year on his KHL deal (presumably coming over after) and Rodrigue turning pro, well, he’ll need a bounce back year this year – you never know with goalies though

    – Rasanen – I don’t know what this news means but its probably not a great sign.

    Berglund, Benson and the Puljujarvi return still have stories to tell I think.

  64. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Its not looking great but the door isn’t closed on much of it:

    – Pulujuarvi – of course, the player will never be 4th overall value nor will we get that in a trade but an asset will likely come back at some point

    – Benson – book is far from closed on this player – he’s a second round pick and they generally need 2-3-4 years post draft – tons of players “make it” in their 21, 22, 23 years

    – Niemelainen may get a contract but it may even be an AHL deal (unlikely to come over on an AHL deal) and, nope, he’s unlikely to ever play in the NHL

    – Berglund remains a prospect of interest and has a solid shot at NHL games this coming season

    – Wells – he’s been passed by Skinner and with Konovalov having one more year on his KHL deal (presumably coming over after) and Rodrigue turning pro, well, he’ll need a bounce back year this year – you never know with goalies though

    – Rasanen – I don’t know what this news means but its probably not a great sign.

    Berglund, Benson and the Puljujarvi return still have stories to tell I think.

    Yeah…four years in…it’s a complete wipeout.

  65. jp says:

    N64:
    Let’s have a drinking game. One shot every time we hear that crazy 0.7% CFR for Korea. It was obtained by diving deaths into cases DURING rapid growth when most cases were too new to die!!!

    Current CFR is 1.38%. But wait 27% of cases there 20-29 and 10% were 30-39. That does not reflect Korea’s pop nor the infection age profile anywhere else. It reflects the cult linked to 2/3 of Korea’s case recruiting mostly 20-29 women. So remove half of the excess 20-29 and bang CFR is above 1.5%. So that 0.7% stat that will not die isn’t even telling half the story on CFR.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_South_Korea

    Before going back to the no intervention case how about the late intervention in Wuhan. Same problem with calculating before most cases aren’t new. Go down to cases and deaths for Wuhan and CFR is 5.0%

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Hubei

    Who knows what CFR is without any intervention? People go to ground everywhere at some point if they can.

    Back to the model I don’t know what CFR they have in mind. If 9 out of 10 cases don’t report the 0.57% IFR is 5.7% CFR

    We agree essentially in full here, I think.

    Still haven’t had a chance to read the ICL article (or your links) but 0.57% IFR seems low still. 9 of 10 cases being asymptomatic/unreported seems lower than reasonable from the bit i’ve seen, at least using South Korea, who have done extensive testing. My whole argument was that even if their reported 0.7% CFR were the going rate (higher than that in reality it seems), 40M deaths from 7B people infected doesn’t add up.

    Using the updated S Korea 1.38% CFR you posted, that would mean ~60% of infections went undetected, correct? is that possible with the amount of testing they’ve done?

  66. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: The 2016 draft is looking like a complete wipeout for the Oilers.

    It’s possible, but this one never even looked like it had a chance. Yikes…

    https://thecanuckway.com/2016/06/25/vancouver-canucks-2016-nhl-draft-grades/

  67. Harpers Hair says:

    jp: It’s possible, but this one never even looked like it had a chance. Yikes…

    https://thecanuckway.com/2016/06/25/vancouver-canucks-2016-nhl-draft-grades/

    The Canucks have been drafting poorly for years until Judd Bracket showed up.

  68. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: The Canucks have been drafting poorly for years until Judd Bracket showed up.

    He was promoted in 2015 so he ran that 2016 draft.

    He did hit on Pettersson and Hughes at least. Unclear on the rest, but clearly better than his performance in 2016.

  69. OriginalPouzar says:

    Harpers Hair: Yeah…four years in…it’s a complete wipeout.

    Well considering they are all about 2 years or so younger than Rafferty who, all of a sudden is a sure fire NHLer at 25, it seems your timelines change to meet your narrative.

  70. OriginalPouzar says:

    I do have to ask, HH, if you were Benning, and were offered Evan Bouchard for Rafferty in a trade, straight up, would you make it?

  71. Bank Shot says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    I do have to ask, HH, if you were Benning, and were offered Evan Bouchard for Rafferty in a trade, straight up, would you make it?

    Lol. This aught to be good.

  72. leadfarmer says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    I do have to ask, HH, if you were Benning, and were offered Evan Bouchard for Rafferty in a trade, straight up, would you make it?

    Depends
    Are you willling add Mcdavid?

    Jk that’s not reasonable at all
    Add Mcdavid and Draisatl

  73. Harpers Hair says:

    jp: He was promoted in 2015 so he ran that 2016 draft.

    He did hit on Pettersson and Hughes at least. Unclear on the rest, but clearly better than his performance in 2016.

    Both Pettersson and Hughes. arguably, would go first overall.

    Not bad.

  74. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    I do have to ask, HH, if you were Benning, and were offered Evan Bouchard for Rafferty in a trade, straight up, would you make it?

    No.

  75. OriginalPouzar says:

    Well, that’s something.

    Would you trade Rafferty for Oscar Klefbom?

    For Ethan Bear?

  76. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Well, that’s something.

    Would you trade Rafferty for Oscar Klefbom?

    For Ethan Bear?

    Klefbom is a LHD and Hughes is already better than him.

    I like Bear but can’t see he is any better than Rafferty.

    Given the cap implications, I would keep Rafferty.

  77. OriginalPouzar says:

    A 22 year old d-man that played an entire season on the top 4, most of it at the top right show d-man isn’t better than a soon to be 25 year old AHLer?

    This is wild stuff.

  78. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: Both Pettersson and Hughes. arguably, would go first overall.

    Not bad.

    Yeah those two are definitely solid.

    Brackett’s record has been pretty barren otherwise though. Just 2 or 3 other picks in 4 years you’d consider to have plus arrows since draft day.

  79. OriginalPouzar says:

    In a 2017 re-draft, an argument could be made for each of Makar, Heisekanan or Pettersson to go 1st overall – those are the top 3 for sure.

    I think Dahlin still goes 1st in a 2018 re-draft, Hughes and Svechnikov fight for 2/3 with Tkachuk 4.

  80. Ben says:

    Harpers Hair: Klefbom is a LHD and Hughes is already better than him.

    I like Bear but can’t see he is any better than Rafferty.

    Given the cap implications, I would keep Rafferty.

    I’ve been doing a lot of trolling on this blog today, but the master has utterly schooled me. I bow in total awe of this profound fuckery.

  81. Munny says:

    Stuff I heard on the radio today:

    More 911 calls in NYC today than on 9-11.

    One NYC hospital had to bring in a reefer truck to move/store dead bodies. Morgues are overwhelmed.

    That said, the scariest thing I saw today was the release of a new FDIC video advising everyone that it was safe to keep your money in the bank.

  82. Munny says:

    Shenzhen Bioeasy Biotechnology is a major manufacturer of Covid test kits.

    The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, testing the test kits they had recently received from SBB, found that the nose swabs had an accuracy rate of less than 30 percent.

    Spain has demanded the Chinese company—which is in the midst of fulfilling orders for 5 million kits—replace the 340,000 kits, which they have agreed to… while stating the kits are fine, they were just being used wrong.

    337,000 tests in S. Korea were done using these same rapid-response kits.

    Edit: the above was from the South China Morning Post (Hong Kong’s daily)… there is no way for me to verify the sources of S. Korea’s test kits, but I will say that the SCMP’s number for the amount of test kits bought from SBB is the same as the total number of tests S. Korea has done to date.

    • Halfwise says:

      And in Czech 80% of Chinese kits were defective. China’s image is taking a well deserved hit despite their efforts to burnish it. Coverup, spin, and spin some more.

      https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3903937

    • N64 says:

      Standard procedures are to test 3 times or 2 times + tie breaker. Also each lab sends first X pos and first X neg samples for retest using different kit. I’d assume S. Korea knew exactly what they got and used it well. See curve, Korea, South.

      • Munny says:

        S. Korea uses a lot of drive-by testing which I don’t believe has 2-3 tests.

        Also we have no idea how any of these kits S. Korea has used. Might be this set of kits is recently received and have hardly been used.

        Every gov’t will be testing their kits now. If it’s a big deal we’ll hear about it.

  83. Lowetide says:

    Harpers Hair: Klefbom is a LHD and Hughes is already better than him.

    I like Bear but can’t see he is any better than Rafferty.

    Given the cap implications, I would keep Rafferty.

    Ladies and gentleman, we have a ‘too close to the Sun’ alert, please put on protective eyewear and do not look directly into the sun.

  84. Todd Macallan says:

    I heard the sun was told not to look directly at Brogan Rafferty.

  85. Rickety Cricket says:

    Lowetide: Ladies and gentleman, we have a ‘too close to the Sun’ alert, please put on protective eyewear and do not look directly into the sun.

    Don’t worry. I took a screenshot of these comments on my phone. I honestly think this was said to raise morale. It was a classy move by DSF.

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