Endless Summer

The Edmonton Oilers arrived in California and fed the Ducks with some solid hockey. Stars included Connor McDavid, Leon Draisaitl, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, Zack Kassian, the penalty kill and Oscar Klefbom. Happy for Patrick Russell, who grabbed the first point of his NHL career in the shadow of the happiest place on earth. A nice Mom’s trip.

THE ATHLETIC!

The Athletic Edmonton features a fabulous cluster of stories (some linked below, some on the site). Great perspective from a ridiculous group of writers and analysts. Proud to be part of The Athletic, less than two coffees a month offer here.

  • New Lowetide: What’s going on with the Bakersfield Condors?
  • New Daniel Nugent-Bowman: Ryan Nugent-Hopkins shines, mad props for Leon Draisaitl and more to like as the Oilers beat the Devils
  • New Daniel Nugent-Bowman: What inexperienced defencemen like the Oilers’ Joel Persson must do to gain their coach’s confidence
  • Lowetide: Oilers are closer to having an effective second line than a year ago, but few have noticed
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman: The beauty of a good night’s sleep can be elusive for many NHL players
  • Jonathan Willis: Why the Oilers were wise to gamble on Tomas Jurco, even though it didn’t pan out
  • Jonathan Willis: The unlikely goalie performances underpinning the Oilers’ hot start
  • Lowetide: How far away is Evan Bouchard and what role will he play with the Oilers?
  • Scott Wheeler: Analyzing Jesse Puljujarvi’s play in Finland to see what he could offer as an NHLer
  • Jonathan Willis: Oilers right to wait until they’re sure before recalling Kailer Yamamoto, Tyler Benson
  • Lowetide:  Can Leon Draisaitl score more than 50 goals this season?
  • Lowetide: Bakersfield Condors coaching staff continues to mold unheralded players into legit NHL prospects.
  • Daniel Nugent-Bowman: Oilers Mailbag: Fixing the forward depth, slotting the big three, a Puljujarvi trade and more
  • Minnia Feng: The 2019-20 Oilers fan guide to emotions and stressful circumstances
  • Jonathan Willis: How much will the Oilers have to pay to keep pending free agent Zack Kassian?
  • Lowetide: Oilers top 20 prospects summer 2019.

OILERS AFTER 19 GAMES

  • Oilers in 2015: 6-12-1, 13 points; goal differential -12
  • Oilers in 2016: 10-8-1, 21 points; goal differential +2
  • Oilers in 2017: 7-10-2, 16 points; goal differential -10
  • Oilers in 2018: 9-9-1, 19 points; goal differential -6
  • Oilers in 2019: 12-5-2, 26 points; goal differential +12

This is new. I mean you can see it in the numbers here but the games themselves are proof. There is structure, there is calm, there is purpose. That was one of the truly impressive games I’ve seen this team play in a long time. Ebenezer Scrooge would have a hard time finding a downbeat from last night’s game.

OILERS IN NOVEMBER

  • Oilers in November 2015: 2-3-0, four points; goal differential -3
  • Oilers in November 2016: 2-2-1, five points; goal differential -3
  • Oilers in November 2017: 3-2-0, six points; goal differential 0
  • Oilers in November 2018: 2-3-0, four points; goal differential -3
  • Oilers in November 2019: 3-1-1, seven points; goal differential +7

It’s been a long time since the Oilers piled up a giant point total in any November. We are early days and there is struggle ahead. Still, this is something else.

WHAT TO EXPECT IN NOVEMBER

  • On the road to: PIT (Expected 0-1-0) (Actual 1-0-0)
  • At home to: ARI, STL, NJD (Expected 2-1-0) (Actual 1-1-1)
  • On the road to: ANA, SJS (Expected 1-0-1) (Actual 1-0-0)
  • At home to: COL, DAL (Expected 1-1-0)
  • On the road to: SJS, LAK, VEG, ARI, COL (Expected 2-3-0)
  • At home to: VAN (Expected 1-0-0)
  • Overall expected result: 7-6-1, 15 points in 14 games
  • Current results: 3-1-1, 7 points after five games

It was a big win because it’s a division game and because several Pacific clubs have lost in the last 48 hours. San Jose has three wins in a row entering tomorrow night’s game, so winning against Anaheim was important.

OILERS 2019-20

As we approach the 20-game mark, it’s fun to multiply everything by four and look for career seasons. It’s also true the checking line hasn’t scored. The goaltending is solid as a rock and that’s a major thing. All numbers five-on-five unless noted and all via NST.

LINE 1 Leon Draisaitl-Connor McDavid-Zack Kassian played 13:12, going 11-20 Corsi, 7-14 shots, 2-1 goals and 5-5 HDSC.

Leon Draisaitl had two assists (plus two power play) two shots, one HDSC and a giveaway plus takeaway. Connor McDavid scored two goals at five-on-five and added a third on the power play. His most brilliant goal looked like the All-Star scoring competition with Ducks for props. Zack Kassian had a strong game, scoring a big goal and grabbing two assists. Four HDSC! Man what a line.

LINE 2 James Neal-Nuge-Alex Chiasson played 11:12, going 19-6 Corsi, 11-3 shots, 1-0 goals and 6-0 HDSC.

James Neal had two shots, two HDSC and a giveaway he was a key i the lead-up to the Nuge goal but received no assist. Nuge was a big story early in the game with his terrific goal (plus a PP marker later), four shots, 2 HDSC and a takeaway. Wonderful game. Alex Chiasson had one shot and two HDSC’s. This line is hammering opponents lately, those possession numbers are crazy good.

LINE 3 Markus Granlund-Gaetan Haas-Patrick Russell played 9:46, going 4-8 Corsi, 1-3 shots, 0-1 goals and 1-1 HDSC.

Markus Granlund had one shot and played over two minutes on an effective PK, but was most noticeable for not doing anything really on the second goal. Gaetan Haas drew two penalties and was around the puck a lot. He’s making Granlund look bad he’s around the disc so much. Patrick Russell got an assist and worked hard all night again.

LINE 4 Jujhar Khaira-Riley Sheahan-Josh Archibald played 8:34, going 4-6 Corsi, 2-3 shots and no goals, 1-0 HDSC.

Jujhar Khaira was good on the forecheck and PK, he is good in a fourth line role. Sheahan had the line’s only HDSC but made a couple of nice passes and Archibald had his best chance to score via a shot less than 10 feet from the net. Most of his shots have been long rangers. He was more involved, spent more time with or near the puck, than I’ve seen. Good sign.

PAIRING ONE Oscar Klefbom and Joel Persson played 16:19, going 15-17 Corsi, 11-10 shots, 0-1 goals and 4-1 HDSC.

Oscar Klefbom had two PP assists, and at five-on-five two shots a takeaway and three blocks. Joel Persson made a poor decision on the first GA, had three shots and one hammer that missed the net but sounded like a rocket. Persson is in danger with Adam Larsson close to his return.

PAIRING TWO Darnell Nurse and Ethan Bear played 13:33, going 12-10 Corsi, 5-7 shots 3-1 goals and 5-4 HDSC.

Darnell Nurse used his speed and size effectively during the evening. He crushed sorties at the blue line and used his speed to retrieve pucks and send them the other way quickly. Bear helps him a lot. Ethan Bear had an assist, but also two giveaways. He recovers well when making a miscue, and Nurse helps him, too. Solid pair. Bear’s passing changes the equation when he’s on the ice.

Pairing Three Kris Russell and Matt Benning were 8-12 in 12:07, 4-5 shots, 1-0 goals and 3-1 HDSC. This pairing had 2 defensive faceoffs, compared to 3 for Nurse-Bear and 4 for Klefbom-Persson. This pairing had 0 offensive zone faceoffs, compared to 2 for Nurse-Bear and 6 for Klefbom-Persson. Tippett does more active coaching than McLellan, in several areas. This is one.

Kris Russell blocked a couple of shots and defended aggressively but there wasn’t much danger for this pairing. In a game like this one Russell is effective without getting noticed. Probably one of the reasons he is underrated by some. Matt Benning had a couple of giveaways that came to no harm and passed the puck well. A quiet night for this pairing but 12:07 TOI at five-on-five says they were giving the top-4D some rest and that’s a solid.

GOALIE Mikko Koskinen stopped 31 of 33, .939 save percentage. NST says he stopped eight of 10 high danger chances, I’m not sure of that total but do know he was splendid when the game was still in doubt.

REMEMBRANCE DAY

Of all the things I thought would never be controversial, the poppy is up there. Oh well, we live in conflicted times. I’m not going to address either news item beyond saying Canadians fighting over our war dead and their symbol is just about the most distasteful thing I’ve had to witness.

My Dad was in the war, rarely talked about it and only showed emotion when talking about his brother Roy. Roy is in Holten this morning and we remember his sacrifice today. This is important stuff. People the age of my children and younger boarded the train in their communities decades ago and did not return. They left their farms, their parents, their futures on the platforms of those train stations.

My neighbour and his wife served in the military; he is now a fireman here back home. I will walk over to his house today and thank him for his service. That’s such a small thing to do but it’s important. His sacrifice, her sacrifice, allowed my children to grow up in a peaceful world. They are the best of us. If you see someone from the military past or present today or a police officer or someone who works in a hospital or healthcare, thank them for their service.

You live in Canada. You won the lottery. Pay respects to our fighting men and women today, responsible for over 100 years of keeping war from our doorstep. Now, more than any time in my life I value the words “lest we forget” and that in and of itself is an alarm. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, read the books on World War 2. Look at the photos. Find the knowledge. Your questions will be answered.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

-Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

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629 Responses to "Endless Summer"

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  1. HT Joe says:

    smellyglove:
    Cherry was just let go by Sportsnet. Good, but too bad he didn’t just go off silently into the night.

    I’m one of the people who was offended by what he said and wrote into Rogers to complain, an act that people here are throwing shade at, “social media virtue signallers who should be put out to pasture”…

    What you’re doing is something I fully support. You saw something wrong and did you part to put an end to it.

    I hope my comment above (about SJW = “poor intent”) doesn’t sound like I don’t support this type of action.

  2. Side says:

    Munny: Likely because he was aware of the insensitivity of the comments, the social media backlash, and because his job was at stake.Not necessarily because he thought Cherry’s intent was wrong.

    But if Cherry’s intent is called into question and he doesn’t really clear the air at all..

  3. OriginalPouzar says:

    Reja: Doesn’t look like my prediction of Jesse plus for a 3 C is going to play out. What’s it going to cost?I guess will find out in the new year.

    Its currently going to cost the signing of Gaetan Haas – not sure if can fill that role nightly but that seems like the plan over the next bit – we’ll see how it goes.

  4. Wonder Llama says:

    defmn: Pretty sure personal abuse is readily available at a number of different locations on the net.😉

    I came here for an argument.

    Sorry, this is abuse.

  5. Harpers Hair says:

    ArmchairGM: Yes. Why consider him a prospect now? He’s with the big team and he’s not going back, he’s an NHL regular. As is Bear.

    Following that logic, any high end player can never be a prospect until and unless he is sent down.

    Clunky.

  6. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: Following that logic, any high end player can never be a prospect until and unless he is sent down.

    Clunky.

    I’m amazed that people are still arguing with you about this.

  7. Buddy says:

    Munny:
    For those unaware, or who have only heard reports and not the actual broadcast,here is the full clip, sans media commentary from Coach’s Corner:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d44QlwurFbQ

    Thanks a lot Munny. I’ve been googling this for half an hour and couldn’t find what he actually said, only the ransom note version.

    You know, we’re all united here by two things, our love of the Oilers and our despair and suffering over the decades of their management’s fantastic incompetence, and I really hate it when something from the real world divides us and makes me realize that we have less in common than I might wish.

  8. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Ben:
    If you could sign Ethan Bear to one of these deals today, which would you pick?

    2 x $2.5
    5 x $4.5

    I go 5 x 4.5 and I don’t think it’s close.

  9. RedNed says:

    Logging in late the morning after. I started watching the game a few minutes before McDavid’s first goal. It was some of the most entertaining hockey I’ve seen all year. Normally I’d start doing other things once the lead blew out but this was the Ducks so I watched it to the end and enjoyed. Team is looking pretty good. Would like young Benson to score more after watching his energetic play.

    And I gotta kick in on the whole politics thing. My own open minded conservatism usually gets me landed in the left leaning green end of the spectrum. But I found I don’t really like the politics that goes with politics (if you know what I mean) so ended up taking the label ‘anti fascist’ as it kinda summed it all up for me. That was years ago. I’ve worn a few bruises as a result, but that’s what happens when you get involved. I’m getting too old for all that stuff now, but I’m proud of those bruises.

    We use the poppies also (in Australia) but all the war mongers wearing them makes me go all don cherry and refuse. What a weird world. Don’t you love it!

    Onwards to SJS. I’m loving this season!

  10. giddy says:

    Lest we forget indeed. My late grandfather bravely enlisted in Greece’s army during WWII at the age of 20 years old, and then fought again in the Greek Civil War that followed shortly after WWII. Nearly nine straight years of war. A few years after that, he boarded a ship that took him across the world, before boarding a train traveling across a frozen hell to meet with a brother of his living in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. No money, no understanding of the language, and no concept of what snow was. His Mediterranean charm proved ample enough to woo a beautiful young woman from Turner Valley, and the rest is history.

    He was one of the lucky ones. To those, like your Uncle Roy LT, who did not receive the same fortune, I will never forget to honor. The sacrifice shown still to this day gives me chills, and tears.

  11. Wilde says:

    Harpers Hair: I don’t see the political spectrum as a linear expression at all.
    It’s circular and the radical left like Antifa and white supremacistsintersect at the bottom of the circle.

    Where the mosque shooter fits is almost immaterial except to say that hate is hate.

    That’s called the Horseshoe theory and it’s nonsensical and always deployed to draw false equivalencies. You don’t have to believe in a purely linear mapping of political philosophy and political economy to know that tactics don’t automatically determine politics – interests, outcomes, aims and intentions do. A soldier on a battlefield shooting people isn’t the same as a murderer shooting civilians.

    The shooting was an explicitly political act by a person who believed that immigration and taking in refugees is a political plot orchestrated to commit white genocide.

    That’s the far-right’s exact theory. That’s their main shtick.

    It walks and talks and shoots like one, it is one. It’s funny that you pin someone you perceive to be on the other side as a political agent and but will deny the mosque shooter’s status as one – when his motivations (and ends) were explicitly political.

  12. jtblack says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I go 5 x 4.5 and I don’t think it’s close.

    Larsson has this yr + 1 more @ $4.5mil.

    RHD shaping up:
    BEAR
    BOUCHARD
    BENNING
    LARSSON

    Larsson will command $6+ I would guess. Sshould Edm sign him long term given what is coming up and Larssons back issues?

  13. ArmchairGM says:

    Harpers Hair: You just saw a prime example of why your vote doesn’t matter.
    Nationally the CPC won considerably more votes but because Liberal support is concentrated in large urban centres, they won the most seats.

    Off topic slightly, but this is why I’d like to see Senate reform. The Senate should consist of 100 members, 10 from each province. There will not be a separate vote for individual senators, the senate will be populated based on the popular vote in the regular federal elections, counting only parties that get over 5% of the popular vote. For instance, Alberta’s party caucuses would send 7 Conservative, 2 Liberal and 1 NDP Senators to Ottawa, due to the popular vote distribution between the 3 parties that received over 5%:

    Conservative: 1,413,360 votes
    Liberal: 280,309
    NDP: 235,013
    Total: 1,928,682

    C: 73.28% = 7 seats won
    L: 14.53% = 2 seats won
    N: 12.19% = 1 seat won

    8 year term option: only 5 seats are available every election in each province or maybe 5 provinces reelect every 4 years.

    I haven’t thought through the details completely, but having a functioning Senate would do this country wonders. And it would remove the unfair treatment of the lessor populated provinces by the 2 overpopulated ones.

  14. defmn says:

    Munny: Likely because he was aware of the insensitivity of the comments, the social media backlash, and because his job was at stake.Not necessarily because he thought Cherry’s intent was wrong.

    Bingo. Because surviving has always been his first instinct.

  15. jp says:

    ArmchairGM,

    You’d give PEI with 157k people the same representation as Ontario with 14.5M people?

    I’m from a province with lesser population/representation but that doesn’t seem at all reasonable.

    Edit: I didn’t realize the exact current breakdown. My province is currently way overrepresented based on population and I didn’t realize how under-represented Alberta and some others are (Ontario also by the way). Some kind of reform is definitely in order but I’m not sure 10 for everyone is the way to go.

  16. ArmchairGM says:

    Harpers Hair: Following that logic, any high end player can never be a prospect until and unless he is sent down.

    Clunky.

    Not at all. Once a player has won a permanent roster spot they are no longer a prospect. IMO McDavid was the best prospect in a decade until he stepped onto the ice in his 1st regular season game wearing Oilers silks. At that point he was no longer a prospect.

    ==

    Prospect definition: the possibility or likelihood of some future event occurring.
    Synonyms: hope, expectation, anticipation

    IMO Hughes / Bear don’t qualify, as they’re HERE now. No more anticipation, it’s go time.

  17. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    jtblack: Larsson has this yr + 1 more @ $4.5mil.

    RHD shaping up:
    BEAR
    BOUCHARD
    BENNING
    LARSSON

    Larsson will command $6+ I would guess.Sshould Edm sign him long term given what is coming up and Larssons back issues?

    I don’t think extending Larsson is a good idea.

    I like him playing out his contract next year though.

  18. tileguy says:

    Harpers Hair: This.

    Wecurrently see a leading feminist author being deplatformed because she believes tans women are men.

    We see a leading scientist depaltformed and kicked out of the University of Victoria for daring to teach students that the polar bear population is thriving not imperiled.
    She’s the leading polar bear biologist in the world.

    We see the leader of the opposition being railroaded by the media because he’s a Catholic and while personally opposed to abortion while vowing not to change the law.
    This all the while the Prime Minister is also a Catholic and the Green Party leader is also personally opposed to abortion.

    I could go on and on but Social Justice is a construct of the radical left to silence anyone that doesn’t share their word view.

    Wow, I just had to look this up, unbelievable!
    https://climatechangedispatch.com/uvic-dumps-polar-bear-professor/

  19. ArmchairGM says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I go 5 x 4.5 and I don’t think it’s close.

    If you’re going to give him $4.5M at least get 7 years a la Klefbom!

  20. Side says:

    Wilde: That’s called the Horseshoe theory and it’s nonsensical and always deployed to draw false equivalencies. You don’t have to believe in a purely linear mapping of political philosophy and political economy to know that tactics don’t automatically determine politics – interests, outcomes, aims and intentions do. A soldier on a battlefield shooting people isn’t the same as a murderer shooting civilians.

    The shooting was an explicitly political act by a person who believed that immigration and taking in refugees is a political plot orchestrated to commit white genocide.

    That’s the far-right’s exact theory. That’s their main shtick.

    It walks and talks and shoots like one, it is one. It’s funny that you pin someone you perceive to be on the other side as a political agent and but will deny the mosque shooter’s status as one – when his motivations (and ends) were explicitly political.

    Don’t you know? All of those right wingers who are racially and politically motivated to kill people are just.. lone wolves and mentally ill. Nothing to see here, just ignore what side they lean on.. these are the one offs..

    Those antifa, pc, liberal, SJW, cancel culture folk, however.. are far more dangerous. Did you see them push over those garbage cans? Scary stuff. This is what the left wing is becoming, folks.

  21. blainer says:

    Harpers Hair: It appears the founding fathers anticipated exactly the situation we see today.
    Without the electoral college, California and New York would dominate the American political scene forever.

    Without an electoral college in Canada we are seeing exactly that issue as the urban elites in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver decide who governs us.

    The rest of the country just doesn’t matter.

    Yup.. I never comment on this sort of thing but will make one comment only of this type and will not respond.

    In Newfoundland we voted all Liberal when Harper was in and had next to no representation as we didn’t elect one conservative. Alberta is going through a very similar thing now.

    There needs to be a better system for times like this so the Provinces who can get left out in the cold after an election get some kind of say. I am normally a Liberal voter but voted conservative in the last election exactly for this reason. I was hoping to get at least one member from our Province in the event that Scheer won. Turns out I was very much in the minority in my way of thinking.

    It’s just sad but we really need to be very careful of our words these days.. such is the world we live in. Sad way for Don to go out. I am on both sides of the issue I guess.

  22. ArmchairGM says:

    jp:
    ArmchairGM,

    You’d give PEI with 157k people the same representation as Ontario with 14.5M people?

    I’m from a province with lesser population/representation but that doesn’t seem at all reasonable.

    Edit: I didn’t realize the exact current breakdown. My province is currently way overrepresented based on population and I didn’t realize how under-represented Alberta and some others are (Ontario also by the way). Some kind of reform is definitely in order but I’m not sure 10 for everyone is the way to go.

    Yes, I would. That way each province has an equal voice in the Senate, while the proportional representation is left to House of Commons.

    Edit to add: Currently Senate seats are: 24 Quebec, 24 Ontario, 24 Maritimes and 24 West. Completely out of sinc with the goal of giving each province and equal voice at the table, and none of these people are voted in anyways meaning the people have nothing to do with who “represents” them. The PM selects the Senators… if the PM is always elected based on haw Ontario decides to vote, how is this fair to, say Alberta?

  23. jojonoshow says:

    defmn,

    You might have to check with your degrees again. I am a self described social justice warrior, and I like Christianity, self describe as a humanist, love western democracy, equal rights, free speech, freedom of religion, and the freedom to pursue your dreams as long as it’s legal. What is the opposite in zero interest in justice? 100 interest in justice? That is how I feel about justice.

    As someone with a philosophy degree: when you make a statement about universals, all I have to do is provide an instance where you are wrong to disprove your universal. In this case, I am that instance.

    Maybe you just have a weird definition of SJW. Maybe we havent defined the terms, but linguistically when I use the phrase, I mean I try to be one of the people who stand for social justice, and the list of freedoms given above.

    Its ok to like Ferraro better than Don for those reasons. In fact, I think it is rather proper.

  24. Ivan says:

    I’ve been reading the posts here today, and after that read the announcement about Don Cherry from Sportsnet.
    All I can say with complete and utter certainty is that there is no such person as Bart Yabsley.
    That is all.

  25. defmn says:

    jojonoshow:
    defmn,

    You might have to check with your degrees again. I am a self described social justice warrior, and I like Christianity, self describe as a humanist, love western democracy, equal rights, free speech, freedom of religion, and the freedom to pursue your dreams as long as it’s legal. What is the opposite in zero interest in justice?100 interest in justice? That is how I feel about justice.

    As someone with a philosophy degree: when you make a statement about universals, all I have to do is provide an instance where you are wrong to disprove your universal. In this case, I am that instance.

    Maybe you just have a weird definition of SJW. Maybe we havent defined the terms, but linguistically when I use the phrase, I mean I try to be one of the people who stand for social justice, and the list of freedoms given above.

    Its ok to like Ferraro better than Don for those reasons. In fact, I think it is rather proper.

    And this is why I never discuss politics on a hockey blog. 😉

  26. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: I come here for the recipes, the whisky recommendations and the personal abuse.
    No place quite like it.

    I just want to make sure we are on the same page here given our recent discussions and back and forth. I have zero issues with you posting here. While I find our opinion anti-Oiler biased, at least they are “reasoned” and with back-up and you don’t insult others even though you do take a bunch of insult back. My back and forth with you recently is in the name of fun more than anything. I hope you don’t consider it personal abuse – honestly.

  27. jp says:

    ArmchairGM: Yes, I would. That way each province has an equal voice in the Senate, while the proportional representation is left to House of Commons.

    Edit to add: Currently Senate seats are: 24 Quebec, 24 Ontario, 24 Maritimes and 24 West. Completely out of sinc with the goal of giving each province and equal voice at the table, and none of these people are voted in anyways meaning the people have nothing to do with who “represents” them. The PM selects the Senators… if the PM is always elected based on haw Ontario decides to vote, how is this fair to, say Alberta?

    Fair enough. I’d still lean towards the larger population provinces having a larger voice but I understand the appeal of your POV.

    There’s no question the current setup is out of whack. I didn’t realize how much so (to my partial defense I’ve been living out of the country for a number of years, but I obviously wan’t aware of this when I was in Canada either). That NS and NB have more senators than BC or AB is completely absurd, no question.

  28. Munny says:

    tileguy: Wow, I just had to look this up, unbelievable!
    https://climatechangedispatch.com/uvic-dumps-polar-bear-professor/

    Inconvenient truths.

  29. jtblack says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I don’t think extending Larsson is a good idea.

    I like him playing out his contract next year though.

    Let him walk as FA?

    trade?

    sign short term?

    I would not want to sign him long term

  30. leadfarmer says:

    tileguy: Wow, I just had to look this up, unbelievable!
    https://climatechangedispatch.com/uvic-dumps-polar-bear-professor/

    A polar bear expert that has never done field research or published on polar bears is like a surgeon who has never operated
    A blog is not a scientifically vetted source
    Even if it’s run by a scientist
    Or a doctor

  31. McSorley33 says:

    What a sad day.

    God Bless Don Cherry.

    God Bless all those that have served and are serving.

  32. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: You can’t have it both ways.

    Pronman considers both players prospects until they’ve played a set number of NHL games.

    Just because a prospect is good doesn’t change that.

    But you’re certainly entitled to see things your own way.

    If Yamamoto gets called up, is he no longer a prospect or does there need to be some established level of performance before their status changes?

    That’s all Pronman is doing.

    I put Credence in Pronman’s list as far as ranking the prospects – I don’t consider his arbitrary set number of games as informative in this regard.

    Quinn Hughes was a good prospect, that’s why he was ranked number 1 on the Canuck’s list and he was a big reason why they were ranked 5th (I think).

    He’s not a prospect any more – he is an NHL player. He is not establishing himself as an NHL player any more – he’s there. He was that good that it didn’t take long. Normally 15 games isn’t enough but this was a top draft pick that was expected to graduate early and has performed at that level.

    Do you think there is any chance he ever gets assigned to the AHL for development or not being good enough? I’m sure the answer is no – hence, remove him from the prospect list.

    Ethan Bear had played 18 NHL games before this season and was still a prospect when the season started but he has since played so well that he’s established himself as an NHL player. Him never seeing the AHL again isn’t quite as certain as Hughes but I’m willing to remove him for the prospect list.

    I’ve already answered your question on Yamamoto – you responded to the post. When called up, he’ll still be a prospect and will be until he’s fully established as an NHL player. It may take 15 games, it may take the rest of the season and in to camp next year, it may take a demotion and another recall. it may never happen.

    Established and graduation from prospect lists is subjective and not to be based on the amount of games played in the NHL – well, if we want an honest discussion.

  33. JimmyV1965 says:

    ArmchairGM: Off topic slightly, but this is why I’d like to see Senate reform. The Senate should consist of 100 members, 10 from each province. There will not be a separate vote for individual senators, the senate will be populated based on the popular vote in the regular federal elections, counting only parties that get over 5% of the popular vote. For instance, Alberta’s party caucuses would send 7 Conservative, 2 Liberal and 1 NDP Senators to Ottawa, due to the popular vote distribution between the 3 parties that received over 5%:

    Conservative: 1,413,360 votes
    Liberal: 280,309
    NDP: 235,013
    Total: 1,928,682

    C: 73.28% = 7 seats won
    L: 14.53% = 2 seats won
    N: 12.19% = 1 seat won

    8 year term option: only 5 seats are available every election in each province or maybe 5 provinces reelect every 4 years.

    I haven’t thought through the details completely, but having a functioning Senate would do this country wonders. And it would remove the unfair treatment of the lessor populated provinces by the 2 overpopulated ones.

    The solution for Alberta is staring us right in the face. We need to demand and acquire total control of tax collection, just like Quebec.

  34. McNuge93 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I go 5 x 4.5 and I don’t think it’s close.

    Wow. I just think it is way premature to commit to that term and $$. He’s only played 20 games this year. That’s a risky bet.

  35. OriginalPouzar says:

    BornInAGretzkyJersey:
    OriginalPouzar,

    Doesn’t our host use 50 games as a line in the sand for skaters and 25 for goalies in differentiating prospects?

    Yes, I believe he does, however, with respect, I don’t think I need to be held to LT’s thresholds on who is and isn’t a prospect.

    I understand the need for those doing rankings to have black and white objective parameters but, from the purpose of this conversation, I think we can real. If we are being real and honest we know with almost certainty that Quinn Hughes is an NHL player and not being re-assigned for development.

    Was Connor McDavid still a prospect 47 games in to his NHL career?

  36. Munny says:

    Buddy: Thanks a lot Munny. I’ve been googling this for half an hour and couldn’t find what he actually said, only the ransom note version.
    You know, we’re all united here by two things, our love of the Oilers and our despair and suffering over the decades of their management’s fantastic incompetence, and I really hate it when something from the real world divides us and makes me realize that we have less in common than I might wish.

    You are most welcome. I thought it only fair for those who hadn’t seen it be given a chance to view the clip unadulterated and come to their own decision about it.

    And I welcome the different views that have been expressed today. That we can do so in an open and civilized manner is a big part of what our soldiers fought for in WWII.

    I am grateful all these views, different as they are, could be expressed in this day and age, Pro-Cherry and anti-Cherry.

    I wish the same right had been extended to Cherry, but when you are speaking as a corporate representative, you also need to be careful about how one’s thoughts are framed in speech.

    I’m glad he’s stood up for his principles and has clarified his position further, I expected nothing less from him. And fortunately he’s in a financial position where he can do so.

    I expect now that he has some free time on his hands he will spend even more of it on charities than he already does. Hopefully that is what he is most remembered for.

  37. OriginalPouzar says:

    BornInAGretzkyJersey:
    OriginalPouzar,

    Doesn’t our host use 50 games as a line in the sand for skaters and 25 for goalies in differentiating prospects?

    This conversation with HH started days ago when he ranked the Canucks current roster ahead of the Oilers as well as their prospect group.

    My position is that Quinn Hughes is an NHL player helping that current roster. He is no longer a prospect that may join the team in the future and then start to help the roster.

    One of the main reasons that the Canucks current roster could be ranked ahead of the Oilers is the play of Quinn Hughes and one of the main reasons (in fact, the main reason) why the Canucks prospect group could (and has) been ranked ahead of the Oilers’ is Quinn Hughes.

    For the purposes of the discussion I was having with HH, I don’t think the arbitrary 25 game line in the sand has meaning and I don’t think Hughes can be used to argue both sides (just like Bear).

  38. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Yes, I believe he does, however, with respect, I don’t think I need to be held to LT’s thresholds on who is and isn’t a prospect.

    I understand the need for those doing rankings to have black and white objective parameters but, from the purpose of this conversation, I think we can real.If we are being real and honest we know with almost certainty that Quinn Hughes is an NHL player and not being re-assigned for development.

    Was Connor McDavid still a prospect 47 games in to his NHL career?

    Henceforth OP will be the sole arbiter of who is and who is not a prospect.

  39. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: We see a leading scientist depaltformed and kicked out of the University of Victoria for daring to teach students that the polar bear population is thriving not imperiled.
    She’s the leading polar bear biologist in the world.

    tileguy: Wow, I just had to look this up, unbelievable!
    https://climatechangedispatch.com/uvic-dumps-polar-bear-professor/

    I don’t know about this woman’s polar bear research, but as this (potentially less than balanced) article itself makes clear she was an “adjunct” assistant professor at UVic. That means she was affiliated with the university but not an employee or paid by the university.

    Hence, I guess, HH’s use of “deplatformed” and the article’s use of “dumped” rather than fired since she was not actually employed by the university (though they did decline to renew her adjunct status).

    According to Wikipedia she has never published a peer-reviewed article about her polar bear research so I think it might be a stretch to call her a “leading scientist”, at least regarding polar bears. There may be much more I don’t know about this story though.

  40. GordieHoweHatTrick says:

    Side: Curious to hear your opinion on what you would do to grow the audience with Cherry out, or what direction Rogers should take now.

    I vote to bring back Peter Puck
    The animation. Not the former oilers owner with that nickname.

  41. AussieOil says:

    Hi Lowetide Community, long time lurker, who comments rarely. But a question for those who have followed the team on the Road. My partner and I are going to games in SJ, LA and LV (woo hoo!), and was wondering any tips on road games. In particular was wondering if it is possible to watch the team practice?

    Lowetide thanks for the Blog, part of my morning routine to get a coffee and read the blog and comments!

  42. BornInAGretzkyJersey says:

    Lowetide,

    I think you raise an important question on an issue that is quickly polarized.

    If being an SJW was merely about equal rights for all and the freedom to pursue what brings you happiness as long as it’s legal (and not at the expense of others), then there would be no quarrel.

    Were I to ascribe a generalized motto to SJWs, it would go like this: It’s never okay to be ageist, racist, or sexist; unless it’s against old white men.

    We live in strange times. The idea used to be that ignorant people were that way due to a lack of information and education. Nowadays, isn’t it ironic that in the Information Age people are more segmented and isolated within narrow political/ideological bubbles due to favoured social media platforms and their proprietary algorithms. Folks are more likely to lash out at people who don’t espouse their narrow worldview and increasingly act to isolate and marginalize those with whom they don’t agree — see Culture, Outrage. A ‘your speech is free, as long as I agree with it’ kind of mentality has permeated institutions such as education and mass media.

    “Kindness is the excuse that social justice warriors use when they want to exercise control over what other people think and say.” — Jordan B. Peterson

    That’s where I take issue: the hypocrisy and the level of vitriol toward anyone who doesn’t conform to the trendy opinion of the day. Very few actors of social progress of the past felt so much license to shame the every day person to the degree the contemporary SJW does in public on a regular basis.

    Free and open speech is dying because of people who need to retreat to a safe-space and broadly (mis-) label someone’s ideas as anti- this or -phobic that, instead of actively listening and engaging in respectful discussions. They seek to condemn and conform instead of understand and engage with those who are different from themselves.

  43. Munny says:

    GordieHoweHatTrick: I vote to bring back Peter Puck
    The animation. Not the former oilers owner with that nickname.

    And Showdown!!

  44. Mr DeBakey says:

    jp:
    ArmchairGM,

    You’d give PEI with 157k people the same representation as Ontario with 14.5M people?

    I’m from a province with lesser population/representation but that doesn’t seem at all reasonable.

    Edit: I didn’t realize the exact current breakdown. My province is currently way overrepresented based on population and I didn’t realize how under-represented Alberta and some others are (Ontario also by the way). Some kind of reform is definitely in order but I’m not sure 10 for everyone is the way to go.

    How about 12 per political unit, with the proviso that no province/Territory would have more Senators than MPs:
    Total 107 Senators
    The Big 6 would have 12 each
    Nova Scotia 11
    New Brunswick 10
    Newfoundland and Labrador 7
    Prince Edward Island 4
    Each of the three Territories 1

    If you used a cap of 15 Senators per, the Senate would have 123 seats

  45. Sierra says:

    pts2pndr:
    This is a difficult day for all vets regardless of where or when they served. While a common refrain is lest we forget, many of those who have served suffer from PTSD and pray to forget. They pray to forget the horrors they have experienced all the while trying to remember their comrades who have paid the ultimate cost. A donation and a poppy is a very worthwhile Canadian tradition. It is also important for all of us to assure that our government takes care of all returning veterans.

    Post of the year.

  46. tileguy says:

    McNuge93: Wow. I just think it is way premature to commit to that term and $$. He’s only played 20 games this year. That’s a risky bet.

    Sometimes you just know, eg Pete with Miko.

  47. Harpers Hair says:

    Wilde: That’s called the Horseshoe theory and it’s nonsensical and always deployed to draw false equivalencies. You don’t have to believe in a purely linear mapping of political philosophy and political economy to know that tactics don’t automatically determine politics – interests, outcomes, aims and intentions do. A soldier on a battlefield shooting people isn’t the same as a murderer shooting civilians.

    The shooting was an explicitly political act by a person who believed that immigration and taking in refugees is a political plot orchestrated to commit white genocide.

    That’s the far-right’s exact theory. That’s their main shtick.

    It walks and talks and shoots like one, it is one. It’s funny that you pin someone you perceive to be on the other side as a political agent and but will deny the mosque shooter’s status as one – when his motivations (and ends) were explicitly political.

    A more nuanced view.
    https://arcdigital.media/the-dayton-shooting-and-left-wing-extremism-594aa1ae9895

  48. Numenius says:

    defmn: And this is why I never discuss politics on a hockey blog.

    I appreciated your earlier post, defmn, and would love to give you a follow on twitter. Would you care to share your handle?

  49. who says:

    Andy Dufresne: Not picking a fight with you Who. On the contrary. You arestanding up for something you believe in, which is the very point of the hallowed day. I will merely point out how the very act of the passing of time, in itself, can create some strange kind of irony.

    I understand your veiwpoint….and, although it may seem wrong or ironic to a younger generation,

    Lest We Forget,

    Don Cherry represents the Vets and that generation (The Greatest Generation)and is in turn represented by them.

    “They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn;
    At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
    We will remember them.”Laurence Binyon

    This is Canada. Respectfully, We dont put our Vets or Elders out to pasture.

    No offense taken.
    Cherry had a point. We should all remember. The racist stuff is just Cherry sticking his foot in his mouth again.
    I’m just glad he gave Sportsnet a good reason to fire his ass. It’s long overdue.
    The way I see it is we wouldn’t have to put these guys out to pasture if they had the good sense to exit gracefully themselves.
    Reminds of the Bob Cole situation. Another guy who was waaaay past his prime and had to be told to quit. And reports were he was pissed about it. Just hard for some guys to let go, I guess.

  50. Wilde says:

    Side: Don’t you know? All of those right wingers who are racially and politically motivated to kill people are just.. lone wolves and mentally ill. Nothing to see here, just ignore what side they lean on.. these are the one offs..

    Those antifa, pc, liberal, SJW, cancel culture folk, however.. are far more dangerous. Did you see them push over those garbage cans? Scary stuff. This is what the left wing is becoming, folks.

    It’s so fucking annoying because I have to end up defending political projects that I find useless-to-unintentionally-harmful-to-actually-disgusting (left-neoliberalism and larpy anarchism) because people think that they’re under attack by people and institutions that are either powerless or only use their power performatively versus the current global Right which is the most powerful political force in human history. Politics is not just the culture war. Grr.

    It’s like when outside observers critique the Oilers and get it all wrong. They don’t even know who has what stakes who the players are, and what the records are and what the history is!

    Their hate is not pure!

  51. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Sorry.
    I would rather rely on an objective standard than your subjective opinion.

    UsingyourBenson example, let’s say he gets called up as an injury replacement but plays well enough to stick around.

    At what exact point does he cease being a prospect?

    Now, let’s say you’ve decided he’s no longer a prospect but he goes through a bad stretch and is sent back down. Does he become a prospect again?

    As I said, its subjective and that is the case for most prospects.
    Not to mention that 25 games is as much arbitrary as it is objective.

    We know, if we are being honest, that Quinn Hughes is not being sent down to the AHL. He’s not a prospect, Cale Makar is not a prospect.

    Ethan Bear remained a prospect after his 18 games a few years ago because his NHL work was very uneven and there was a very good chance he was going back to the AHL. That was the case one-month ago as well. Since then, he’s graduated in my opinion, not because of he’s played 25 games but because he’s essentially established himself – its not quite as certain as Hughes but I’m pretty confident.

    Fine though, if you want to arbitrarily wait a few more weeks until Hughes has played 25 games to admit he’s all of a sudden established due to games played and is no longer a prospect, fine.

  52. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    AussieOil,

    – Vegas – going to their practice arena is for sure a no brainer. It’s a real treat small time and it’s capacity crowd playing cool music with a DJ just bonkers!

    – Also it’s my experience that the team reactes well to the consumption of doubles. It’s like fight juice that gets them reeved up.

    – While I don’t have the stats year to prove the relationship between doubles and performance it’s a hypothesis that warrants investigation by multiple independent persons when visiting team on road

    – Sounds like a awesome road trip

  53. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    ArmchairGM: If you’re going to give him $4.5M at least get 7 years a la Klefbom!

    I’d go as long as he’d sign for.

    You get one chance for McKinnon/Ellis type value contracts and his is this summer.

    I hope Holland sees it the same way.

  54. OriginalPouzar says:

    Oh, and further, 2

    Reja: 3 years at 10 mil it gets done in the new year.

    Don’t need to wait for the new year, they can do that now if they wanted.

    Not sure how I feel about that contract given I would like to keep it to two years.

    Zack will be 29 when it kicks in so I’m not worried about regression per se but have we seen enough to know “this is him”? Maybe that’s why you want to wait until the new year?

    What about in a year when there are more offensive Oilers that bump him out of the top 6 – are we OK with a 3rd line winger for $3M? Ya, maybe we are.

  55. leadfarmer says:

    Harpers Hair: Henceforth OP will be the sole arbiter of who is and who is not a prospect.

    Well in all fairness Pronman didn’t have Mcdavid as a prospect after his 45 game rookie season so his defined 50 game rule isn’t hard set
    But hockey futures Pronman Lt all used 50 games so that’s what most used
    Other than you two I don’t think anyone cares as long as if you count one you count the other or you exclude one you exclude the other

  56. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I’d go as long as he’d sign for.

    You get one chance for McKinnon/Ellis type value contracts and his is this summer.

    I hope Holland sees it the same way.

    There is probably a good argument for going 2 years now in order to keep cap space free to sign a high/trade for a high end forward since the cap will jump in 22/23

  57. OriginalPouzar says:

    Ben:
    If you could sign Ethan Bear to one of these deals today, which would you pick?

    2 x $2.5
    5 x $4.5

    Ugh, can I wait until April?

  58. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    jtblack: Let him walk as FA?

    trade?

    sign short term?

    I would not want to sign him long term

    EDM needs him still next year.

    Probably let him walk.

    Sign him after the expansion draft if they still want him but I’m not sure they will.

  59. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Nope.
    OP was insisting weeks ago that Hughes wasn’t a prospect.

    Couple weeks? This was last week sometime.

    I don’t need Pronman’s arbitrary thresholds to tell me that Hughes in an NHL player and is not going to be re-assigned for development.

  60. McSorley33 says:

    leadfarmer:
    Harpers Hair,

    I would actually say the opposite is true
    Look at the bathroom issue in the last presidential election
    Instilling fear that men are going to dress as women and assault children in public bathrooms and waging a fear campaign
    Now after they got elected how many “bathroom” laws were actually passed?Next to 0
    Because most people couldn’t describe the last 5 people they have seen in a public bathroom
    Try it.
    Because people don’t really care what bathroom you use

    The world is moving a lot faster than some people can handle. Gay marriage was a huge issue not too long ago, now it seems like it’s not a big deal except to a small percentage of the population

    The gender pronouns thing was a issue a few years ago but now people are realizing if that’s what you want to be called I’ll follow the rules of not being a dick and go along
    I mean we called prince by a freaking symbol for years

    Nobody actually called Prince a symbol.

    Nobody actually uses the 48…no wait 49 …..now 50 mandated pronouns?

  61. Harpers Hair says:

    leadfarmer: Well in all fairness Pronman didn’t have Mcdavid as a prospect after his 45 game rookie season so his defined 50 game rule isn’t hard set
    But hockey futures Pronman Lt all used 50 games so that’s what most used
    Other than you two I don’t think anyone cares as long as if you count one you count the other or you exclude one you exclude the other

    I’m quite happy adhering to Pronmans or Lowetides parameters since they tend to capture a wide range of prospects.
    No need that I can see to make exceptions.

    A very good test case would be the Canucks Adam Gaudette who has played 69 games spread over three seasons.

    He played 56 games last season only because Brandon Sutter and Jay Beagle were out for the season due to injury.

    He started this season in the AHL so hasn’t established himself and is waiver exempt and can be sent back down.

    Most, me included, would no longer call him a prospect but a tweener but OPs thinking would seem to suggest he is still a prospect.

  62. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    McNuge93: Wow. I just think it is way premature to commit to that term and $$. He’s only played 20 games this year. That’s a risky bet.

    It is risky but like Nuke Laloosh he’s announced his presence with authority.

    He’s a player and won’t get cheaper.

  63. AussieOil says:

    Kinger_Oil.redux,

    Ha! Thanks, Vegas practice sounds fun. If I could I could get into Oilers practices even better, but maybe closed to public?

    I will try the Doubles tip, maybe this will counteract my terrible track record going to Oiler Games (although most in the decade of darkness).

  64. Woodguy v2.0 says:

    Wilde,

    It’s like when outside observers critique the Oilers and get it all wrong. They don’t even know who has what stakes who the players are, and what the records are and what the history is!

    That’s the easy part.

    Always blame the best players on bad teams for not being better leaders.

  65. OriginalPouzar says:

    jp: Well Cave is no longer with the team so that puts Granlund in the 6-man PK rotation.

    No, not essential, but if he sits then Draisaitl or other will replace his 2+ minutes a game.

    I only even mentioned PK minutes in response to OPs question about it. As I said, I don’t expect Tippett to change the lineup coming off two fairly dominant wins (and I also have no problem with that). As I also said I think Nygard will eventually get into the lineup at Granlund’s expense (looking forward to it).

    I should say further (for the Granlund haters) that there’s not much in his semi-recent results to suggest he should sit. In his past 10 games he’s 3GF-2GA at 5v5 with matching xGF% and positive underlying metrics across the board. He’s been quite decent, if not exciting to watch.

    As usual, good post and info.

    I think one of the reasons that Tippett likes Granlund is that he’s responsible out there – night in and night out and shift in and shift out. We rarely him, right? Well, that goes both ways – we don’t see him make many mistakes out there (although potentially culpable on a goal yesterday).

    Yes, drops are to be pissed but he’s serviceable and similar on the PK. We don’t see him make the “spectacular diving clear” but he is good at blocking the passing lane and is positionally sound.

    With that said, bring on some Nygard (well, maybe not quite next game, maybe though).

  66. JimmyV1965 says:

    leadfarmer: A polar bear expert that has never done field research or published on polar bears is like a surgeon who has never operated
    A blog is not a scientifically vetted source
    Even if it’s run by a scientist
    Or a doctor

    This is rubbish of course. Crockford has studied polar bears for 20 years. You’re correct that she has done no field research, but it’s a rather closed shop and it hasn’t stopped her from studying the issue intensely. The doctor analogy is a red herring.

  67. defmn says:

    AussieOil:
    Kinger_Oil.redux,

    Ha! Thanks, Vegas practice sounds fun.If I could I could get into Oilers practices even better, but maybe closed to public?

    I will try the Doubles tip, maybe this will counteract my terrible track record going to Oiler Games (although most in the decade of darkness).

    I would contact the Oilers office and tell them about your trip and see if they offer you anything like a signed jersey or opportunity to watch a practice or meet a couple of players. Their PR department is much better than it used to be from what I have heard.

  68. defmn says:

    Numenius: I appreciated your earlier post, defmn, and would love to give you a follow on twitter. Would you care to share your handle?

    It’s the same as here but I should warn you that I am a little bit past cranky about the federal election that just took place so I may not be as much fun as I could be right now. 😉

  69. Reja says:

    OriginalPouzar:
    Oh, and further, 2

    Don’t need to wait for the new year, they can do that now if they wanted.

    Not sure how I feel about that contract given I would like to keep it to two years.

    Zack will be 29 when it kicks in so I’m not worried about regression per se but have we seen enough to know “this is him”? Maybe that’s why you want to wait until the new year?

    What about in a year when there are more offensive Oilers that bump him out of the top 6 – are we OK with a 3rd line winger for $3M? Ya, maybe we are.

    That’s what I think Holland will sign him at he’s playing great responsible hockey. His true value will be seen in the playoffs.

  70. Harpers Hair says:

    JimmyV1965: This is rubbish of course. Crockford has studied polar bears for 20 years.You’re correct that she has done no field research, but it’s a rather closed shop and it hasn’t stopped her from studying the issue intensely.The doctor analogy is a red herring.

    Scientifically vetted is also a red herring since it actually means peer reviewed which says nothing more than it does not conform to the current conventional wisdom.

    Blood letting was once a peer reviewed method of curing all sorts of ailments but hasn’t stood the test of time since so many of the patients died on the table.

  71. rickithebear says:

    We have seen a Beautiful influx of Christian Philippine immigration to Western Canada.
    People taking on jobs, our spoiled entitled children will not, over the last decade.
    The joining/addition of small town community from people and children.

    Many on here forget that the Poppy is the first symbol of Canada the seperate country.
    Recognized as its own nation force.

    Not that flag with a Sugar maple leaf from trees specific to Maritimes, Quebec, and Southern Ontario.
    Not reflective of maple in Nortern Ontario, Southern Manitoba and BC.
    Or
    Praires almost devoid of maple.

    In this time of political Correctness
    The most correct thing we Should do is have that flag of exclusion banned.

    All though I would prefer 3 dominate leaves of western boreal be saved for the flag of Western Canada.
    😇

  72. slopitch says:

    Extending Bear is getting to be top prio of my list of things Id like to see Holland do. Id like to see Benson and Yamo and Jones recalled but the team is playing pretty good so its not that urgent. Id also like to see JP moved but if that waits till the season is over I think the return will be higher or he may come back.

    Sign Bear! Stat!

  73. New Improved Darkness says:

    I put a few links in a comment just posted on Don Cherry and all things SJW which is now “awaiting moderation”. Not all of my comments are worth rescuing from purgatory, but I think this one is.

  74. Andy Dufresne says:

    Pescador: You didn’t offend me in anyway, I read your comment in support of mine

    Good. Glad to hear that. Thank You.

  75. fishman says:

    who: No offense taken.
    Cherry had a point. We should all remember. The racist stuff is just Cherry sticking his foot in his mouth again.
    I’m just glad he gave Sportsnet a good reason to fire his ass. It’s long overdue.
    The way I see it is we wouldn’t have to put these guys out to pasture if they had the good sense to exit gracefully themselves.
    Reminds of the Bob Cole situation. Another guy who was waaaay past his prime and had to be told to quit. And reports were he was pissed about it. Just hard for some guys to let go, I guess.

    Bryan Hall says hi!

  76. Andy Dufresne says:

    Wonder Llama: I came here for an argument.

    No you didnt.

  77. geowal says:

    So…..how bout that Bobby Ryan trade idea?
    🤔
    *ducks

  78. pts2pndr says:

    Lowetide:
    I’m not wading in here on Cherry, will save my comments for the radio. However I do have a question for the group: Why do people think ‘social justice warrior’ is an insult?? If being one means that I stand for equal rights for all, for free speech, freedom of religion, freedom to pursue your dreams as long as it’s legal, freedom of race, creed, color or orientation, then sign me the hell up!

    My wife’s siblings are all adopted, as is she. Two of her siblings are POC. They all grew up in a house on first street in Medicine Hat and they all love each other and laugh and cry with the good and the bad of their family. They don’t know anything other than their reality.

    Days like this I think we could learn a lot from that family.

    I agree. As far as we have come in social justice we still have miles to go. It is scary to think the short step back and the number of people that believe in that step back. It is imperative that we learn to celebrate our differences and understand that diversity does not make us weak but makes us all stronger. Once again LT thanks for all you do.

  79. rickithebear says:

    Lead farmer:
    When I worked at PANP.
    Their was a former Alcatraz Prison Guard who moved to the park.
    Lived yr round in his RV.

    He was known as Wolfman.

    Travelled the forest and had become known to a pack of wolves.
    After a while the pack acted normal around his sensed presence.
    Became accepted to periphery of the pack.
    The pack and all the offspring new/ saw him and his smell.
    He would never tell us if it was full acceptance and interaction with the pack.
    The Pack split into 3 and they dominated most of the Park.
    He was accepted by all three and was able to have stack upon stacks of observation in his RV.

    This would be actual field observation.

    Not 2 weeks out in the field and 54 weeks spending the grants in house.

    These so called Feild experts were not the ones to determine the feeding period during concerned melt was not the critical part of Polar bears Feeding Cycle.

    That the population has flourished.
    Was pulled off the endangered species by standard
    And returned to the list cause of the peers pressure, they were concerned about losing their grants.

    Simple science:
    Check data versus standard endangered convention.

  80. JimmyV1965 says:

    Harpers Hair: Scientifically vetted is also a red herring since it actually means peer reviewed which says nothing more than it does not conform to the current conventional wisdom.

    Blood letting was once a peer reviewed method of curing all sorts of ailments but hasn’t stood the test of time since so many of the patients died on the table.

    It’s like saying Tyler Dellow knows crap about the NHL because he didn’t play the game. The NHL is a closed shop. The polar bear research community is even smaller and much more tightly knit.

  81. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Following that logic, any high end player can never be a prospect until and unless he is sent down.

    Clunky.

    Not true, Jesse Puljujarvi never got rid of prospect status – should he have after his first 25 games? By your objective, and arbitrary, number, he hasn’t been a prospect in 3 years.

    Right now even Jack Hughes should be considered a prospect considering his somewhat disapointing start to his pro career. Unlike little brother Jack, Quinn has been able to establish himself as a legit NHL player

  82. Harpers Hair says:

    JimmyV1965: It’s like saying Tyler Dellow knows crap about the NHL because he didn’t play the game.The NHL is a closed shop. The polar bear research community is even smaller and much more tightly knit.

    And the people who have lived with the bears for millennia, the Inuit, are ignored when they say populations are increasing because it doesn’t fit the narrative.

  83. Andy Dufresne says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I don’t think extending Larsson is a good idea.

    I like him playing out his contract next year though.

    Why not trade him in the summer for picks or prospects?

  84. OriginalPouzar says:

    jp: I’m amazed that people are still arguing with you about this.

    I’m discussing.

    Two people (or more) can have differing opinions on a subject and go back and forth without it be “arguing” which, to me, connotes negativity and adversarialness. I’m just having a discussion as I sift through hundreds of the non-hockey posts that don’t interest me (I say that with no disrespect or judgement – talk about what you want people – I’m just looking for hockey talk).

  85. defmn says:

    Harpers Hair: And the people who have lived with the bears for millennia, the Inuit, are ignored when they say populations are increasing because it doesn’t fit the narrative.

    “In individuals, insanity is rare; but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule.”
    ― Friedrich Nietzsche

  86. jp says:

    Harpers Hair: Scientifically vetted is also a red herring since it actually means peer reviewed which says nothing more than it does not conform to the current conventional wisdom.

    Blood letting was once a peer reviewed method of curing all sorts of ailments but hasn’t stood the test of time since so many of the patients died on the table.

    Scientifically vetted = peer reviewed. OK, no problem there.

    Peer reviewed = does not conform to current conventional wisdom. Nope, not at all sure about that one.

    Blood letting was once peer reviewed. Now you’ve lost me.

    I don’t think peer reviewed means what you think it means?

  87. OriginalPouzar says:

    jtblack: Larsson has this yr + 1 more @ $4.5mil.

    RHD shaping up:
    BEAR
    BOUCHARD
    BENNING
    LARSSON

    Larsson will command $6+ I would guess.Sshould Edm sign him long term given what is coming up and Larssons back issues?

    Not that its material but I don’t think Larsson is quite that high – I think he’s at $4.16.

    I also don’t think he will get anything near $6M per on his next deal – I’m thinking it comes in around what his current AAV is – maybe a bump to $4.5M.

    I wouldn’t touch the guy at $6M on his next deal – even if playoff season Larsson shows himself for this season and next. I have time for that player at $4.5M for 2-3 but can’t say that it would be a “good deal” given organizational depth.

    If we assume Bear is legit in the top 4 is Bouchard ready for top 4 RD for 2021/22? Maybe. Maybe not. If he is, I would love Larsson at 3RD but, of course, $4.5M is a bit steep.

    Benning will be half the price still, likely, but, my hope is that Phil Kemp may be playing 3RD on his ELC at that time.

  88. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Not true, Jesse Puljujarvi never got rid of prospect status – should he have after his first 25 games?By your objective, and arbitrary, number, he hasn’t been a prospect in 3 years.

    Right now even Jack Hughes should be considered a prospect considering his somewhat disapointing start to his pro career.Unlike little brother Jack, Quinn has been able to establish himself as a legit NHL player

    Jesse is not a prospect any longer…he’s a failed draft pick.
    He’s proven it repeatedly in the NHL.

    Jack Hughes is a prospect just like his brother.

    While he started slowly he is New Jersey’s third leading scorer ahead of Nico Hischier, Pavel Zacha and Jesper Bratt.

    One would assume he would be less likely to be sent down than any of those players since he’s outproducing them.

    So once again we run up against subjectivity and your argument falls apart.

  89. OriginalPouzar says:

    ArmchairGM: If you’re going to give him $4.5M at least get 7 years a la Klefbom!

    I think I agree with this – there is alot of risk for the team in that contract.

  90. Material Elvis says:

    AussieOil:
    Hi Lowetide Community, long time lurker, who comments rarely. But a question for those who have followed the team on the Road. My partner and I are going to games in SJ, LA and LV (woo hoo!), and was wondering any tips on road games. In particular was wondering if it is possible to watch the team practice?

    Lowetide thanks for the Blog, part of my morning routine to get a coffee and read the blog and comments!

    Maybe I’ll see you there. My wife and I are doing the LA and Vegreville games, too. I must warn you, however, that I plan on drinking doubles (it’s a proven winning strategy).

  91. Material Elvis says:

    jp: Scientifically vetted = peer reviewed. OK, no problem there.

    Peer reviewed = does not conform to current conventional wisdom. Nope, not at all sure about that one.

    Blood letting was once peer reviewed. Now you’ve lost me.

    I don’t think peer reviewed means what you think it means?

    Is he arguing for or against scientific method? I can’t tell. ‘My peers are rejecting my pseudoscience therefore they are wrong’ is false.

    Blood letting was not peer reviewed by anything close to the standards set today. That was a poor analogy.

  92. Material Elvis says:

    I do have to agree with HH when it comes to JP; he isn’t a prospect anymore.

  93. Lowetide says:

    Material Elvis: Maybe I’ll see you there.My wife and I are doing the LA and Vegreville games, too.I must warn you, however, that I plan on drinking doubles (it’s a proven winning strategy).

    Vegreville game should be a blast. There’s a Burger Baron!

  94. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: Is he arguing for or against scientific method?I can’t tell.‘My peers are rejecting my pseudoscience therefore they are wrong’ is false.

    Blood letting was not peer reviewed by anything close to the standards set today.That was a poor analogy.

    Enforcing conformity is no less dangerous today than it was then.

  95. rickithebear says:

    19 gm in our team has given up 47 ga,
    Less 5 EN,
    42 reg phase = 2.21 GA/gm
    Less 2 Smith specials.
    40 reg phase GA = 2.11 GA/ gm

    Last yr
    271GA = 3.30 GA/gm
    Less 14 EN
    257 GA = 3.13 GA/gm

    Their is approx. 48 minutes of even play per game.

    Prefer dman evga be per 16.
    1/3 of Even game minutes.

    Oiler D:
    Manning 8 gm .18 evga/16
    Russel 19 gm .21 evga/16
    Benning 19 gm .26 evga/16
    —————————————-
    Klefbom 19gm .61 evga/16
    Persson 10gm .73 evga/16
    Nurse 19gm .77 evga/16
    Bear 19gm .77 evga/16

    Makes it clear as day that one of the bottom 4 needs to seed for Larsson.

  96. OriginalPouzar says:

    jtblack: Let him walk as FA?

    trade?

    sign short term?

    I would not want to sign him long term

    Asset management is, of course, always key but this may be a time where it makes sense to let a decent asset walk.

    They likely won’t be in a position to trade him this off-season (well, unless Jones pop as a legit off-side 2RD – unlikely) as Bouchard will not be ready for top 4 RD.

    At the same time, the team likely won’t want to move on from him at the deadline where the return would be picks/prospects – presumably they will be gearing up for the playoffs, not selling.

  97. Todd Macallan says:

    Lowetide: Vegreville game should be a blast. There’s a Burger Baron!

    I miss the Tastee Freez in Veg.

  98. Material Elvis says:

    Lowetide: anything

    I forget what Burger Baron tastes like. Is it similar to a rink burger?

  99. Fuhr and Lowething. says:

    Lowetide: Vegreville game should be a blast. There’s a Burger Baron!

    Two foods I miss the most living in North Carolina.

    Donairs and Burger Baron mushroom burgers. Man…

  100. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: Enforcing conformity is no less dangerous today than it was then.

    Conformity is not the goal of scientific method.

  101. GMB3 says:

    Munny: Likely because he was aware of the insensitivity of the comments, the social media backlash, and because his job was at stake.Not necessarily because he thought Cherry’s intent was wrong.

    So Don didn’t mean to be xenophobic, he just was by accident? Lol

    For a guy who said he’s going “sheerly by his words” it seems to be you’re actually inferring something that kind of flies directly in the face of what Ron said.

  102. Professor Q says:

    This ‘His Dark Materials’ show is a bit interesting, if not a bit confusing thus far.

    I’ve never read the series, but am getting into it.

    The Stormlight Archive and The Expanse as well, however.

  103. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: Conformity is not the goal of scientific method.

    No, of course it’s not.
    But the scientific method and peer review are poor bedfellows.
    One begets progress, the other begets conformity which is the antithesis of progress.

  104. duct tape and foil says:

    Trotting out weird uncle Don every weekend in his costumes was bizarre 30 years ago and now it’s just sad. It also highlights how fossilized Canadian broadcasting is when Burke is seen as an upgrade.

    But people need to remember what those poppies are really all about. It’s not the “fight for freedom” which is base war propaganda at its worst. It’s about remembering young men and women who fought and gave their lives for nothing except more power for the elites and their bankers. Wear that poppy to remember the young men and women who fought for lies and power, and the ordinary people killed by our government in every illegal and immortal war that the Canadian government has been involved in since the end of WW2. There is nothing to be proud about in our involvement in Korea, Iraq, Yugoslavia, Libya, Afghanistan and Syria. No freedom was saved or found in those battles that stole whatever moral standing Canada built up as “peace keepers” in the years between Korea and Yugoslavia. Only profits were generated for the war mongers and their funders at the expense of people living in those countries and our national soul. Wear the poppy for those people and send bigots and chicken hawks like Cherry to the closet where they belong.

  105. rickithebear says:

    Seth Jones:
    19/20
    .84 evga/16
    .35 evp/16 #309 skater
    That is not good goal diff math per 1/3 of gm even minutes.

    Pass!

  106. rickithebear says:

    Material Elvis:
    Maintaining your grant with fudged data is becoming the scientific norm.

  107. Harpers Hair says:

    rickithebear:
    Material Elvis:
    Maintaining your grant with fudged data is becoming the scientific norm.

    This.

  108. jp says:

    rickithebear:
    Material Elvis:
    Maintaining your grant with fudged data is becoming the scientific norm.

    Harpers Hair: This.

    Hahaha. This is so fucking sad.

  109. Harpers Hair says:

    Upon the news of Don Cheery’s firing…Fabricland has declared bankruptcy.

    Too soon?

  110. leadfarmer says:

    duct tape and foil,

    Yes but today is the day to remember those people that were told to go and knowing they may not come home they went willingly
    Not the people who were responsible for the war

  111. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: No, of course it’s not.
    But the scientific method and peer review are poor bedfellows.
    One begets progress, the other begets conformity which is the antithesis of progress.

    I don’t view it that way. The peer review is a necessary component of maintaining the integrity of the process. Any conclusions (hypothesis, methods, samples, analyses) should be able to withstand a proper critique in order to achieve valid results.

  112. Halfwise says:

    Great thread today.

    I learned more today about what Scott Adams calls the ‘other half of the movie audience’. His memorable interpretation is that we all sit in the same theatre but are watching different movies.

    Trump, racism, world wars, climate change, polar bears, Trudeau, multiculturalism, poppies, Larsson, whatever. The way some other people interpret things is as surprising to me as my views would be to them.

    I’m glad we are free. Thank you, vets, for your service.

  113. Halfwise says:

    Material Elvis: I don’t view it that way.The peer review is a necessary component of maintaining the integrity of the process.Any conclusions (hypothesis, methods, samples, analyses) should be able to withstand a proper critique in order to achieve valid results.

    That’s the intent, but it’s not the reality. Humans are only human.

  114. Todd Macallan says:

    Caps come back from down 3 zip to beat the Yotes in OT. I’ll take it.

  115. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: I don’t view it that way.The peer review is a necessary component of maintaining the integrity of the process.Any conclusions (hypothesis, methods, samples, analyses) should be able to withstand a proper critique in order to achieve valid results.

    A proper critique by whom exactly?

    Galileo and Einstein among many, many others would disagree since their “peers” were relative idiots.

    Do you know that leading Egyptologists still maintain the pyramids were built as tombs for the Pharaohs despite the fact that NOT ONE tomb has ever been found in the hundreds of pyramids in Egypt?

    But, the science is settled.

  116. Material Elvis says:

    rickithebear:
    Material Elvis:
    Maintaining your grant with fudged data is becoming the scientific norm.

    What are you basing this incorrect statement on? That is definitely not what I experienced back in my laboratory days. We experimented in health sciences. The sponsors of grants wanted accurate information because their products would inevitably be challenged by private and government laboratories. Fudging numbers would costs companies millions of dollars — they are not incentivized to cheat. There are outliers in the world and some researchers have fudged data. This is not the norm.

  117. stephen sheps says:

    Well, even though nobody asked me to chime in (and people can see my thoughts on the twitters if they want), but I feel like as a sociology professor who’s occasionally asked to publicly speak about this sort of thing and who’s written about hockey, race and Don Cherry in a professional context, I probably should weigh in on the debate. If it crosses a line, I assume Lowetide, will send me a note asking me to take it down and I’ll happily and respectively abide by such a request.

    There are lots of competing and often contradicting ideas being thrown about in the wake of Don’s firing, one that I am admittedly very happy about and wish would have happened years ago. I have many questions, not the least of which being ‘why now?’ I’ve also seen many takes suggesting that what Don said (this time) wasn’t blatantly racist or intolerant and that a good man and patriot lost his job as a result of straw-men like ‘cancel culture’ and ‘millennials’ being too sensitive. I’ve seen equally impassioned conversations from racialized hockey fans, immigrants and children of immigrants whose own family members also fought in the great war or fought against fascism barely a generation later who were justifiably upset. I’m going to share my family’s story now and provide a bit of insight into where I stand on all of this.

    As many but not all of you know, my family is Jewish. My late grandmother escaped Poland before things got real bad in 1930. My grandfather was the first to be born in the ‘new world’ in Brooklyn in 1922, his family emigrated as a result of real bad pogroms in Belarus in the early 1900s. My dad’s side of the family also had similar stories, escaping the shtetl for a better life here in Canada.

    My father’s great uncle, Capt. Sam B. Sheps was one of the few Jewish soldiers in the Canadian Forces during WWII, while my grandfather, Cpl. J. M. Soroka fought for the US army in that same war. My Zaida, because he was Jewish was sent to Asia, serving at a supply station in Korea. He made it home, met my grandmother a year later and moved to Edmonton in 1950. My great uncle was not so lucky. As a result of Capt. Sheps’ bravery, the Canadian gov’t named a lake after him, Sheps Lake, in northern Manitoba.

    See, my family were Jewish immigrants to North America in what was at the time the most difficult period in Jewish history. My family members served. They did what they needed to do, and those that made it back built lives for themselves here. It’s pretty awesome.

    What Don said on Saturday hurt. What he said essentially devalued immigrants and immigration, effectively suggesting that ‘us people’ are not Canadian enough in his eyes, whatever that means. But this form of bigotry, xenophobia and cruelty was not the first incident. If it had been, perhaps the outcry would not have been so extreme. This is the point I think many have missed – it wasn’t about what Don said on Saturday that made the network decide to pull the plug, it was about the history of Don saying things that were, quite honestly much worse.

    Just shy of two weeks ago during the heritage classic, the National Chief of Canada’s Assembly of First Nations was invited onto Coach’s Corner to speak on the significance of the event, the location, the involvement of Indigenous communities and the NHL’s new scholarships provided to two universities in treaty 4 territory for indigenous student athletes. Ron MacLean had thoughtful, insightful questions, tried to highlight the number of skilled players currently in the league and even made an attempt to use Indigenous words (i.e. Miigwech – Nishnaabeg for ‘thanks’). Don wanted to watch highlights of classic indigenous players getting into fights, and when a photo of the national Chief’s father was shown, he immediately said ‘boy that’s a big guy. Must’ve been an enforcer!’

    What Don was doing on national television was essentially engaging in an old sport-media trope – racial stacking. I teach the idea of racial stacking in sports in my sport sociology class, drawing upon the history of African American quarterbacks and Indigenous hockey players – quarterbacks as most of us know were historically told they were best suited to other skilled positions by virtue of their bodies and physicality vis-a-vis their perceived lack of intelligence. Indigenous hockey players on the other hand were historically stacked into the enforcer’s role. This was framed as being a result of the hard lives they lived, surviving the difficult conditions of living on reserves or residential schools. The key here is about fighting to survive – land being occupied, language and culture stripped, playing the sport of the colonizer and being told that fighting was your ticket to the big leagues. This is heady stuff, yet it’s a part of the settler-colonial legacy of Canada that is badly under-studied. When Don kept going on and on about the various tough guys from indigenous communities he knows, even calling Stan Jonathan his ‘pit bull’, this is the message he was putting into the world.

    In 2015, Don went on an anti-Russian rant involving kids playing in the GTHL, a for profit minor hockey league in the GTA and surrounding areas. After going on one of his usual ‘took our jobs’ rants, he closed by saying ‘Keep Canadian Hockey for Canadians and keep the Foreigners out. And you better listen, because I’ll be watching’.

    In 2009, he went on a rant about ‘goofy soccer guys’ (and in the clips he showed, literally every soccer player was a person of colour) saying that Canadian players better not look or act like those guys. That’s not the ‘Canadian Way’.

    Throughout his career he’s said awful things about Russian players, Euros, Francophones and just about anyone who didn’t look or think like he does.

    In 1990, he was interviewed for the Fifth Estate, an interview in which he claimed ‘Canadians are ticked off at the foreigners coming over earning the dough … I just say what I think, and that’s the way I think. You can say it’s bigotry if you want; I don’t think it is Canada first, and Canada only. That’s what I am. A nationalist. I want to start a new power, the nationalists.’

    Don was fired today because he had to be, not just for what he said on the weekend but for the things he’s said over the last 38 years of broadcasting, because people finally grew sick of enabling and defending him, hiding him, shielding him from criticism and because quite frankly times have changed.

    I’m going to leave a quote here from the great journalist Sydney J. Harris, who articulates the difference between patriotism and nationalism far better than I ever could: “The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.”

    The blind arrogance is why it was time for Don to go. Personally I won’t miss him.

  118. leadfarmer says:

    jp:
    Hahaha. This is so fucking sad.

    It’s too funny that two guys that have never done any research or published a peer review paper are experts on the process.
    First of all the scientific process has changed quite a bit since bloodletting. From absolutely none
    To a closely vetted process even before you get funded because the dollars are so short
    Secondly you get caught fudging data you are discredited for life. You DONT WANT that. You will not get hired or find funding.
    Yes A lot of research has next to little impact on the average persons life but once in a while someone discovers something significant
    Yes sometimes the accepted conclusion gets changed over time as something new gets discovered but you need to publish so it can be critiqued and your experiment can be reproduced and confirmed by an independent scientist.
    So for example in a 100 years I’m sure they will look back on our current cancer treatments and think we did nothing but inject poison into people which sometimes helped but you know what it was vetted by many experts and through scientific process determined to be the best treatment
    Not a freaking blog

  119. Harpers Hair says:

    Halfwise:
    Great thread today.

    I learned more today about what Scott Adams calls the ‘other half of the movie audience’. His memorable interpretation is that we all sit in the same theatre but are watching different movies.

    Trump, racism, world wars, climate change, polar bears, Trudeau, multiculturalism, poppies, Larsson, whatever. The way some other people interpret things is as surprising to me as my views would be to them.

    I’m glad we are free. Thank you, vets, for your service.

    Can’t endorse this strongly enough but also need to also caution there is a very strong undercurrent of silencing of dissenting opinions in our society.

    Much vigilance is required.

  120. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: A proper critique by whom exactly?

    Galileo and Einstein among many, many others would disagree since their “peers” were relative idiots.

    Do you know that leading Egyptologists still maintain the pyramids were built as tombs for the Pharaohs despite the fact that NOT ONE tomb has ever been found in the hundreds of pyramids in Egypt?

    But, the science is settled.

    Ok back to relevant, modern day science, ‘peer reviewed’ means other experts in that field of research. There are no stand alone Einsteins anymore. There are brilliant minds in all aspects of math, science, and humanities.

  121. duct tape and foil says:

    leadfarmer:
    duct tape and foil,

    Yes but today is the day to remember those people that were told to go and knowing they may not come home they went willingly
    Not the people who were responsible for the war

    Respectfully, it’s a day to both remember the sacrifices of ordinary people and the avarice that sent them into harm’s way for nothing but bloody lucre. Sacrifice without purpose, or for evil purpose, needs to be remembered if we are to avoid it in the future.

  122. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: Can’t endorse this strongly enough but also need to also caution there is a very strong undercurrent of silencing of dissenting opinions in our society.

    Much vigilance is required.

    Dissenting opinions just screams internet pseudoscience.

  123. texmex says:

    Todd Macallan:
    Caps come back from down 3 zip to beat the Yotes in OT. I’ll take it.

    Nope. Oshie was offsides.

    Yotes win in SO

  124. stephen sheps says:

    Harpers Hair: there is a very strong undercurrent of silencing of dissenting opinions in our society.

    Much vigilance is required.

    We often sit on opposite sides of the political spectrum my friend, and yet I always thoroughly enjoy our chats. I hope eventually finding a way to disagree respectfully makes its way back to being the norm rather than the exception, in terms of research (publicly funded or otherwise), politics and daily life.

  125. Material Elvis says:

    Halfwise: That’s the intent, but it’s not the reality. Humans are only human.

    I don’t understand your response. Why is that not the reality? What circumstance can you direct me to that rejects my statement?

  126. Todd Macallan says:

    texmex: Nope. Oshie was offsides.

    Yotes win in SO

    Yikes. Thanks for the correction. That’s what I get for trying to beat OP to an Oiler-relevant hockey update.

  127. Material Elvis says:

    Anyone watching MNF? DK Metcalf is a load for the Seahawks.

  128. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: Dissenting opinions just screams internet pseudoscience.

    Denying conformity is a pernicious force just screams a vested interest.

  129. Halfwise says:

    Material Elvis: Dissenting opinions just screams internet pseudoscience.

    Science advances from dissenting opinions.

    How do you feel about continental drift? Or the virus explanation for ulcers? Dissenters were mocked until they were proved right.

    Humans are just human.

  130. vangolf says:

    The idea of social justice has always been offensive to me. Why the need for “social”? It just invites subjective interpretation for preconceived narratives. “Justice” without any qualifier should be the goal imho.

  131. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: Denying conformity is a pernicious force just screams a vested interest.

    The dissenting opinion crowd has a vested interest. Not sure what your point is.

  132. leadfarmer says:

    Harpers Hair,

    Actually there’s a lot of distrust in what is called establishment
    Researchers make up data to get funding
    Doctors are just trying to get rich and are in the pocket of big pharma
    The world is run by the Illuminati
    How do I know this
    I read it on the internet so I know it must be true

  133. Halfwise says:

    stephen sheps: We often sit on opposite sides of the political spectrum my friend, and yet I always thoroughly enjoy our chats. I hope eventually finding a way to disagree respectfully makes its way back to being the norm rather than the exception, in terms of research (publicly funded or otherwise), politics and daily life.

    +1

  134. Kinger_Oil.redux says:

    stephen sheps,

    – Thanks for this and thanks for sharing it.

    – One of my friends was trying to say that it’s too bad that 49 years of work goes down the tube because he misspoke. I had to shut that down.

    – I was looking forward to the day Grapes finally hung up his skates and hear what he said on his final coaches corner but he made sure that wasn’t happening

    – His use of the term “you people” reminded me of whenFuzzy Zoeller was asking about the dinner Tiger was going to serve for his first Masters Champions Dinner and Fuzzy said something similar about grits and collared greens or “whatever those people eat”. Fuzzy never recovered from that.

  135. Material Elvis says:

    Halfwise: Science advances from dissenting opinions.

    How do you feel about continental drift? Or the virus explanation for ulcers? Dissenters were mocked until they were proved right.

    Humans are just human.

    No, science advances from experimentation, testing conclusions, and sharing that information to be challenged and retested.

  136. JimmyV1965 says:

    Material Elvis: Is he arguing for or against scientific method?I can’t tell.‘My peers are rejecting my pseudoscience therefore they are wrong’ is false.

    Blood letting was not peer reviewed by anything close to the standards set today.That was a poor analogy.

    It would probably take my 15 minutes to find a dozen studies illustrating the flaws with peer review, especially in the medical field. One of the most famous of course is Rape Culture and Queer Performativity at Urban Dog Parks, a made up study vetted by peer review.

  137. Harpers Hair says:

    stephen sheps: We often sit on opposite sides of the political spectrum my friend, and yet I always thoroughly enjoy our chats. I hope eventually finding a way to disagree respectfully makes its way back to being the norm rather than the exception, in terms of research (publicly funded or otherwise), politics and daily life.

    That’s what we all should strive for. But increasingly tribalism is making that very difficult.

    With your family background, I am certain you can see that respectful disagreement is becoming much more difficult.

    This can be very dangerous.

  138. Material Elvis says:

    leadfarmer:
    Harpers Hair,

    Actually there’s a lot of distrust in what is called establishment
    Researchers make up data to get funding
    Doctors are just trying to get rich and are in the pocket of big pharma
    The world is run by the Illuminati
    How do I know this
    I read it on the internet so I know it must be true

    The Illuminati *and* the Clinton Foundation!

  139. Harpers Hair says:

    leadfarmer:
    Harpers Hair,

    Actually there’s a lot of distrust in what is called establishment
    Researchers make up data to get funding
    Doctors are just trying to get rich and are in the pocket of big pharma
    The world is run by the Illuminati
    How do I know this
    I read it on the internet so I know it must be true

    This a prima facia case of a drive by smear.

  140. flyfish1168 says:

    Lowetide: Vegreville game should be a blast. There’s a Burger Baron!

    Maybe Slats will be there.

  141. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: The Illuminati *and* the Clinton Foundation!

    And another.

  142. Halfwise says:

    Material Elvis: No, science advances from experimentation, testing conclusions, and sharing that information to be challenged and retested.

    Yes.

    That requires dissent if the conclusion disagrees with the consensus. Dissent requires courage because humans are tribal.

  143. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: And another.

    The Pentaverate?

  144. JimmyV1965 says:

    stephen sheps:
    Well, even though nobody asked me to chime in (and people can see my thoughts on the twitters if they want), but I feel like as a sociology professor who’s occasionally asked to publicly speak about this sort of thing and who’s written about hockey, race and Don Cherry in a professional context, I probably should weigh in on the debate. If it crosses a line, I assume Lowetide, will send me a note asking me to take it down and I’ll happily and respectively abide by such a request.

    There are lots of competing and often contradicting ideas being thrown about in the wake of Don’s firing, one that I am admittedly very happy about and wish would have happened years ago. I have many questions, not the least of which being ‘why now?’ I’ve also seen many takes suggesting that what Don said (this time) wasn’t blatantly racist or intolerant and that a good man and patriot lost his job as a result of straw-men like ‘cancel culture’ and ‘millennials’ being too sensitive. I’ve seen equally impassioned conversations from racialized hockey fans, immigrants and children of immigrants whose own family members also fought in the great war or fought against fascism barely a generation later who were justifiably upset. I’m going to share my family’s story now and provide a bit of insight into where I stand on all of this.

    As many but not all of you know, my family is Jewish. My late grandmother escaped Poland before things got real bad in 1930. My grandfather was the first to be born in the ‘new world’ in Brooklyn in 1922, his family emigrated as a result of real bad pogroms in Belarus in the early 1900s. My dad’s side of the family also had similar stories, escaping the shtetl for a better life here in Canada.

    My father’s great uncle, Capt. Sam B. Sheps was one of the few Jewish soldiers in the Canadian Forces during WWII, while my grandfather, Cpl. J. M. Soroka fought for the US army in that same war. My Zaida, because he was Jewish was sent to Asia, serving at a supply station in Korea. He made it home, met my grandmother a year later and moved to Edmonton in 1950. My great uncle was not so lucky. As a result of Capt. Sheps’ bravery, the Canadian gov’t named a lake after him, Sheps Lake, in northern Manitoba.

    See, my family were Jewish immigrants to North America in what was at the time the most difficult period in Jewish history. My family members served. They did what they needed to do, and those that made it back built lives for themselves here. It’s pretty awesome.

    What Don said on Saturday hurt. What he said essentially devalued immigrants and immigration, effectively suggesting that ‘us people’ are not Canadian enough in his eyes, whatever that means. But this form of bigotry, xenophobia and cruelty was not the first incident. If it had been, perhaps the outcry would not have been so extreme. This is the point I think many have missed – it wasn’t about what Don said on Saturday that made the network decide to pull the plug, it was about the history of Don saying things that were, quite honestly much worse.

    Just shy of two weeks ago during the heritage classic, the National Chief of Canada’s Assembly of First Nations was invited onto Coach’s Corner to speak on the significance of the event, the location, the involvement of Indigenous communities and the NHL’s new scholarships provided to two universities in treaty 4 territory for indigenous student athletes. Ron MacLean had thoughtful, insightful questions, tried to highlight the number of skilled players currently in the league and even made an attempt to use Indigenous words (i.e. Miigwech – Nishnaabeg for ‘thanks’). Don wanted to watch highlights of classic indigenous players getting into fights, and when a photo of the national Chief’s father was shown, he immediately said ‘boy that’s a big guy. Must’ve been an enforcer!’

    What Don was doing on national television was essentially engaging in an old sport-media trope – racial stacking. I teach the idea of racial stacking in sports in my sport sociology class, drawing upon the history of African American quarterbacks and Indigenous hockey players – quarterbacks as most of us know were historically told they were best suited to other skilled positions by virtue of their bodies and physicality vis-a-vis their perceived lack of intelligence. Indigenous hockey players on the other hand were historically stacked into the enforcer’s role. This was framed as being a result of the hard lives they lived, surviving the difficult conditions of living on reserves or residential schools. The key here is about fighting to survive – land being occupied, language and culture stripped, playing the sport of the colonizer and being told that fighting was your ticket to the big leagues. This is heady stuff, yet it’s a part of the settler-colonial legacy of Canada that is badly under-studied. When Don kept going on and on about the various tough guys from indigenous communities he knows, even calling Stan Jonathan his ‘pit bull’, this is the message he was putting into the world.

    In 2015, Don went on an anti-Russian rant involving kids playing in the GTHL, a for profit minor hockey league in the GTA and surrounding areas. After going on one of his usual ‘took our jobs’ rants, he closed by saying ‘Keep Canadian Hockey for Canadians and keep the Foreigners out. And you better listen, because I’ll be watching’.

    In 2009, he went on a rant about ‘goofy soccer guys’ (and in the clips he showed, literally every soccer player was a person of colour) saying that Canadian players better not look or act like those guys. That’s not the ‘Canadian Way’.

    Throughout his career he’s said awful things about Russian players, Euros, Francophones and just about anyone who didn’t look or think like he does.

    In 1990, he was interviewed for the Fifth Estate, an interview in which he claimed ‘Canadians are ticked off at the foreigners coming over earning the dough … I just say what I think, and that’s the way I think. You can say it’s bigotry if you want; I don’t think it is Canada first, and Canada only. That’s what I am. A nationalist. I want to start a new power, the nationalists.’

    Don was fired today because he had to be, not just for what he said on the weekend but for the things he’s said over the last 38 years of broadcasting, because people finally grew sick of enabling and defending him, hiding him, shielding him from criticism and because quite frankly times have changed.

    I’m going to leave a quote here from the great journalist Sydney J. Harris, who articulates the difference between patriotism and nationalism far better than I ever could: “The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.”

    The blind arrogance is why it was time for Don to go. Personally I won’t miss him.

    Excellent; excellent post.

  145. Professor Q says:

    Harpers Hair: A proper critique by whom exactly?

    Galileo and Einstein among many, many others would disagree since their “peers” were relative idiots.

    Do you know that leading Egyptologists still maintain the pyramids were built as tombs for the Pharaohs despite the fact that NOT ONE tomb has ever been found in the hundreds of pyramids in Egypt?

    But, the science is settled.

    The peers of Galileo and Einstein were most definitely not idiots, relative or not. Some of the greatest minds we know of were their contemporaries.

  146. Material Elvis says:

    Halfwise: Yes.

    That requires dissent if the conclusion disagrees with the consensus. Dissent requires courage because humans are tribal.

    If the conclusion disagrees with the consensus, then that should be an indication to re-examine both the consensus and the outlier. How has experimenter bias affected results?

  147. Wilde says:

    Harpers Hair: A more nuanced view.
    https://arcdigital.media/the-dayton-shooting-and-left-wing-extremism-594aa1ae9895

    Even if I were to stipulate that shooting was a political act (it wasn’t, very obviously, but you’ll just dodge that too) you still are attempting to defend an indefensible position, that political positions and goals are the same if similar (not really similar) acts are taken for their purposes.

    Under this logic, Canadian and German soldiers in WW2 were the same because they were both trying to kill each other.

    And, and, and, AND, this position was also your pivot away from the previous one: that the Quebec Mosque shooting wasn’t a political act but a trust fund baby trans woman litigiously harassing a salon is.

    To summarise:

    1) The left is out of control because trans lady bad

    2) Explicitly committing an act of political terrorism isn’t political

    3) Accepting it’s political (?) but someone on the left did it

    You move to 2) without addressing the obvious argument against 1) and then move to 3) without addressing that it’s in contradiction with 2).

    Can shootings be political or can they not be? Are shootings worse than civil lawfare? If they are, why didn’t you lead with the Dayton shooting?

    The worst thing about your dishonesty is that you don’t even accept premises and then pivot out to make a broader point, you just jump away from engaging. It’s cowardly.

  148. godot10 says:

    JimmyV1965: I can’t stand Justin Trudeau. I think he’s a fraud, I think he puts virtue signalling ahead of public policy, and I don’t think he’s particularly intelligent. I dislike him more than any other political leader since his father.

    But he’s not a racist. He did something stupid, repeatedly for some bizarre reason, but that does not make him racist. Just like Cherry’s stupid comments don’t make him racist.

    There were many many reasons not to vote for Trudeau. Racism isn’t one of them.

    The India trip was racist.

    In the Rolling Stones profile after the election in 2015, Trudeau said he intentionally targeted an indigenous person to beat up in a boxing match, and demanding a racist tribute as the stakes of the boxing match if he won. He then followed through and exacted his racist claim on the loser.

    He has tattooed himself with a colonizer’s tattoo.

    At a Liberal fundraiser in Toronto, in response to two indigenous persons who paid to attend to challenge him on his broken promises on Grassy Narrows, he sarcastically responded to them “Thank you for your donation”, and had them forciably removed.

    Trudeau had anonymous bullies defame Wilson Raybould in the media during the SNC-Lavalin scandal. Both the Toronto Star and Canadian Press have subsequently apologized from those pieces (but refuse to name Trudeau’s bullies).

    He has groped a women. Warren Kinsella, in his blog and in a published opinion piece in the Sun, says he was told by a senior Liberal that there are multiple affadavits regarding his behavior towards women. i.e. There is never just one cockroach.

    When Sophie was at home with two youn children during the Liberal leadership convention in 2012 (which Ignatieff won), he (then forty) hit on then college student Faith Goldy and her friends in a bar, and invited them to another.

    While an elected MP, Trudeau collected speaker’s fees from charities and NGO’s, and refused to return them when it was revealed.

    He has admitted to breaking the law while an elected MP. (smoking cannabis).

    This has all been normalized by the Laurentian establishment, their media, and “social justice warriors”. Anyone else would have been cancelled or disqualified.

    We have (and have normalized) a racist and misogynist as prime minister of Canada.

  149. leadfarmer says:

    Harpers Hair: That’s what we all should strive for. But increasingly tribalism is making that very difficult.

    With your family background, I am certain you can see that respectful disagreement is becoming much more difficult.

    This can be very dangerous.

    You can find opinions on anything you want on the internet and a lot of them are inconsequential
    But sometimes they are harmful
    When you have patients that swear their turmeric is going to cure their cancer because a turmeric salesman convinced them otherwise You understand that some of those voices should not be heard
    I think you are smart enough to realize that a lot of those dissenting opinions have motives outside of truth, such as money

  150. Halfwise says:

    Material Elvis: If the conclusion disagrees with the consensus, then that should be an indication to re-examine both the consensus and the outlier.How has experimenter bias affected results?

    First you said that dissenters had a vested interest. Glad you changed your mind.

    All experimenters have bias. We are human.

  151. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Henceforth OP will be the sole arbiter of who is and who is not a prospect.

    Nope, not at all but, if we are being honest, I think we can agree that Quinn Hughes is an established NHL player that won’t be seeing development time in the AHL.

    Can you agree to that.

    Yes, I will also look at each player in the context of their development and NHL abilities and use that over an arbitrary games played number.

    We can often discuss and have differing opinions on whether a player is established and done with the development league or not but, if you are being honest with yourself, I’m very confident you know there is no discussion with Hughes,

    Noah Dobson has been on the NHL roster this year for the same amount of time as Hughes but he is very much still a prospect and likely headed back to the Q. Q. Hughes – not the same.

  152. Wilde says:

    stephen sheps,

    what’s your twitter @

  153. jp says:

    JimmyV1965: It would probably take my 15 minutes to find a dozen studies illustrating the flaws with peer review, especially in the medical field.One of the most famous of course is Rape Culture and Queer Performativity at Urban Dog Parks, a made up study vetted by peer review.

    Can you find anything that doesn’t have flaws sometimes?

    Any system that isn’t perfect can be completely discounted?

  154. Munny says:

    Material Elvis: I don’t view it that way.The peer review is a necessary component of maintaining the integrity of the process.Any conclusions (hypothesis, methods, samples, analyses) should be able to withstand a proper critique in order to achieve valid results.

    There are dire issues with peer review.

    Bias:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1420798/

    Replication Crisis:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replication_crisis

    Edit: as JimmyV says there are dozens of articles on this serious issue.

  155. flyfish1168 says:

    stephen sheps:
    Well, even though nobody asked me to chime in (and people can see my thoughts on the twitters if they want), but I feel like as a sociology professor who’s occasionally asked to publicly speak about this sort of thing and who’s written about hockey, race and Don Cherry in a professional context, I probably should weigh in on the debate. If it crosses a line, I assume Lowetide, will send me a note asking me to take it down and I’ll happily and respectively abide by such a request.

    There are lots of competing and often contradicting ideas being thrown about in the wake of Don’s firing, one that I am admittedly very happy about and wish would have happened years ago. I have many questions, not the least of which being ‘why now?’ I’ve also seen many takes suggesting that what Don said (this time) wasn’t blatantly racist or intolerant and that a good man and patriot lost his job as a result of straw-men like ‘cancel culture’ and ‘millennials’ being too sensitive. I’ve seen equally impassioned conversations from racialized hockey fans, immigrants and children of immigrants whose own family members also fought in the great war or fought against fascism barely a generation later who were justifiably upset. I’m going to share my family’s story now and provide a bit of insight into where I stand on all of this.

    As many but not all of you know, my family is Jewish. My late grandmother escaped Poland before things got real bad in 1930. My grandfather was the first to be born in the ‘new world’ in Brooklyn in 1922, his family emigrated as a result of real bad pogroms in Belarus in the early 1900s. My dad’s side of the family also had similar stories, escaping the shtetl for a better life here in Canada.

    My father’s great uncle, Capt. Sam B. Sheps was one of the few Jewish soldiers in the Canadian Forces during WWII, while my grandfather, Cpl. J. M. Soroka fought for the US army in that same war. My Zaida, because he was Jewish was sent to Asia, serving at a supply station in Korea. He made it home, met my grandmother a year later and moved to Edmonton in 1950. My great uncle was not so lucky. As a result of Capt. Sheps’ bravery, the Canadian gov’t named a lake after him, Sheps Lake, in northern Manitoba.

    See, my family were Jewish immigrants to North America in what was at the time the most difficult period in Jewish history. My family members served. They did what they needed to do, and those that made it back built lives for themselves here. It’s pretty awesome.

    What Don said on Saturday hurt. What he said essentially devalued immigrants and immigration, effectively suggesting that ‘us people’ are not Canadian enough in his eyes, whatever that means. But this form of bigotry, xenophobia and cruelty was not the first incident. If it had been, perhaps the outcry would not have been so extreme. This is the point I think many have missed – it wasn’t about what Don said on Saturday that made the network decide to pull the plug, it was about the history of Don saying things that were, quite honestly much worse.

    Just shy of two weeks ago during the heritage classic, the National Chief of Canada’s Assembly of First Nations was invited onto Coach’s Corner to speak on the significance of the event, the location, the involvement of Indigenous communities and the NHL’s new scholarships provided to two universities in treaty 4 territory for indigenous student athletes. Ron MacLean had thoughtful, insightful questions, tried to highlight the number of skilled players currently in the league and even made an attempt to use Indigenous words (i.e. Miigwech – Nishnaabeg for ‘thanks’). Don wanted to watch highlights of classic indigenous players getting into fights, and when a photo of the national Chief’s father was shown, he immediately said ‘boy that’s a big guy. Must’ve been an enforcer!’

    What Don was doing on national television was essentially engaging in an old sport-media trope – racial stacking. I teach the idea of racial stacking in sports in my sport sociology class, drawing upon the history of African American quarterbacks and Indigenous hockey players – quarterbacks as most of us know were historically told they were best suited to other skilled positions by virtue of their bodies and physicality vis-a-vis their perceived lack of intelligence. Indigenous hockey players on the other hand were historically stacked into the enforcer’s role. This was framed as being a result of the hard lives they lived, surviving the difficult conditions of living on reserves or residential schools. The key here is about fighting to survive – land being occupied, language and culture stripped, playing the sport of the colonizer and being told that fighting was your ticket to the big leagues. This is heady stuff, yet it’s a part of the settler-colonial legacy of Canada that is badly under-studied. When Don kept going on and on about the various tough guys from indigenous communities he knows, even calling Stan Jonathan his ‘pit bull’, this is the message he was putting into the world.

    In 2015, Don went on an anti-Russian rant involving kids playing in the GTHL, a for profit minor hockey league in the GTA and surrounding areas. After going on one of his usual ‘took our jobs’ rants, he closed by saying ‘Keep Canadian Hockey for Canadians and keep the Foreigners out. And you better listen, because I’ll be watching’.

    In 2009, he went on a rant about ‘goofy soccer guys’ (and in the clips he showed, literally every soccer player was a person of colour) saying that Canadian players better not look or act like those guys. That’s not the ‘Canadian Way’.

    Throughout his career he’s said awful things about Russian players, Euros, Francophones and just about anyone who didn’t look or think like he does.

    In 1990, he was interviewed for the Fifth Estate, an interview in which he claimed ‘Canadians are ticked off at the foreigners coming over earning the dough … I just say what I think, and that’s the way I think. You can say it’s bigotry if you want; I don’t think it is Canada first, and Canada only. That’s what I am. A nationalist. I want to start a new power, the nationalists.’

    Don was fired today because he had to be, not just for what he said on the weekend but for the things he’s said over the last 38 years of broadcasting, because people finally grew sick of enabling and defending him, hiding him, shielding him from criticism and because quite frankly times have changed.

    I’m going to leave a quote here from the great journalist Sydney J. Harris, who articulates the difference between patriotism and nationalism far better than I ever could: “The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.”

    The blind arrogance is why it was time for Don to go. Personally I won’t miss him.

    Best written peace of the of the day

  156. Victoria Oil says:

    DocFan:
    I’ve read the entire comments section today, please forgive me for adding my 2 cents

    This whole Don Cherry or Remembrance day issue isn’t really about Don Cherry or Remembrance Day. I don’t think there is any group (First Nations, Multi Generational Canadian, 1st Generation Canadian, New Immigrant) who does not appreciate what WWI / WWII or any war for that matter means to those who serve. I cannot even begin to imagine what those people who lived through that era went through. If Canadians are not supporting their veterans, then it’s something we should all talk about openly as Canadians, not as a member of an individual group. As we can see throughout the comments, many of us have served or have relatives who have served, regardless of our heritage or backgrounds.

    What this issue is really about, to me, is singling out a group of people. I don’t believe this represents any Canadian values that I’m aware of. We accept diversity in Canada, it’s one of our strengths. So if Don Cherry, or anyone for that matter, chooses to single out a group of Canadians, there should be consequences. Sometimes, we have to do whats hard to maintain what we believe is right (which is what a lot of WWI / WWII was all about).

    Lest we forget.

    If Don just said that all Canadians should get off their butts, buy a poppy, wear it and proudly support our current and past armed forces personnel, we’d probably all me nodding in agreement today.

    Unfortunately, he turned a positive sentiment into a negative by singling out a group of Canadians. Sad and unfortunate.

  157. Material Elvis says:

    Halfwise: First you said that dissenters had a vested interest. Glad you changed your mind.

    That’s not how the conversation went. HH said that the experimenters had a vested interest in the results (implying financial compensation I assume). I replied by stating that the dissenting opinion had a vested interest (the need to be right in the face of irrefutable evidence; also financial compensation).

  158. stephen sheps says:

    Wilde,

    @ShepsStephen

    To be fair I very rarely use it for anything other than DMs and once in a while a post self-promoting my academic stuff or when I write about music. DMs are great though. Made a few great friends from this community by directly chatting with them over there.

    JimmyV1965,
    Kinger_Oil.redux,

    Thanks for the kind words

    Halfwise,
    Harpers Hair,

    Indeed it’s difficult, and you’re right I do understand. we live in very weird, polarizing times. This place is often a wonderful solace from the usual mudslinging and virtue signalling online. Today’s wide-ranging 500+ comment on a non-game-day thread is no exception

  159. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: I’m quite happy adhering to Pronmans or Lowetides parameters since they tend to capture a wide range of prospects.
    No need that I can see to make exceptions.

    A very good test case would be the Canucks Adam Gaudette who has played 69 games spread over three seasons.

    He played 56 games last season only because Brandon Sutter and Jay Beagle were out for the season due to injury.

    He started this season in the AHL so hasn’t established himself and is waiver exempt and can be sent back down.

    Most, me included, would no longer call him a prospect but a tweener but OPs thinking would seem to suggest he is still a prospect.

    Yup, I would still consider him a prospect. He is 23 (just 23) and could very well still establish himself as an middle 6 or bottom six NHLer.

    Its interesting that you don’t consider the 23 year old Gaudette as a prospect but yet, when this conversation started, you posted current stats of a 23 year old and a 26 year old in the AHL as evidence of the Canucks prospect superiority.

    Is that not direct and irrefutable evidence that you are changing your own parameters in order to meet your own chosen narrative?

    Come on HH, be honest in discussion, and with yourself.

  160. Pouzar says:

    Side: antifa

    ANTIFA…garbage can pushers.

    You can’t make it up.

  161. knighttown says:

    Seismic Source: But it doesn’t. Alberta plays no role in deciding who the PM is.

    A single province party (like the Bloc) shouldn’t decide an election and a double province party probably shouldn’t either. A Justin Trudeau badly wounded by the SNC scandal was exceedingly beatable but the conservatives just have to make SOME effort to appeal to the rest of the country.

  162. OriginalPouzar says:

    AndyDufresne: Why not trade him in the summer for picks or prospects?

    I would think the plan for next year is to be a contender and, at this point, there is no established replacement for him in the top 4 right side – Bouchard will not be established there by the end of this year. He is needed for the team next year.

  163. Material Elvis says:

    Munny: There are dire issues with peer review.

    Bias:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1420798/

    Replication Crisis:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replication_crisis

    I wouldn’t describe those issues as dire. As the author of the link you posted says’”The question isn’t if we should abandon peer review, but how to improve it”.

  164. Halfwise says:

    Material Elvis: That’s not how the conversation went.HH said that the experimenters had a vested interest in the results (implying financial compensation I assume).I replied by stating that the dissenting opinion had a vested interest (the need to be right in the face of refutable evidence; also financial compensation).

    Everyone has a vested interest. Money, acceptance, comfort with the status quo. The consensus has a vested interest, which will usually be stronger than a dissenter’s vested interest.

    Humans are just human. It’s not complicated.

  165. godot10 says:

    Lowetide:
    I’m not wading in here on Cherry, will save my comments for the radio. However I do have a question for the group: Why do people think ‘social justice warrior’ is an insult?? If being one means that I stand for equal rights for all, for free speech, freedom of religion, freedom to pursue your dreams as long as it’s legal, freedom of race, creed, color or orientation, then sign me the hell up!

    Social justice is fine. So-called “social justice warriors”, as others have said, no long stand for most of the things you mention, i.e. equal rights for all, free speech, freedom of religion.

    Specifically, although it is extremely muddied right now, it will eventually become clear that so-called “social justice warriors” are the greatest menace to women’s rights and gay rights. Women’s rights are in grave danger from contemporary “social justice warriors”.

  166. JimmyV1965 says:

    godot10: The India trip was racist.

    In the Rolling Stones profile after the election in 2015, Trudeau said he intentionally targeted an indigenous person to beat up in a boxing match, and demanding a racist tribute as the stakes of the boxing match if he won.He then followed through and exacted his racist claim on the loser.

    He has tattooed himself with a colonizer’s tattoo.

    At a Liberal fundraiser in Toronto, in response to two indigenous persons who paid to attend to challenge him on his broken promises on Grassy Narrows, he sarcastically responded to them “Thank you for your donation”, and had them forciably removed.

    Trudeau had anonymous bullies defame Wilson Raybould in the media during the SNC-Lavalin scandal.Both the Toronto Star and Canadian Press have subsequently apologized from those pieces (but refuse to name Trudeau’s bullies).

    He has groped a women.Warren Kinsella, in his blog and in a published opinion piece in the Sun, says he was told by a senior Liberal that there are multiple affadavits regarding his behavior towards women. i.e. There is never just one cockroach.

    When Sophie was at home with two youn children during the Liberal leadership convention in 2012 (which Ignatieff won), he (then forty) hit on then college student Faith Goldy and her friends in a bar, and invited them to another.

    While an elected MP, Trudeau collected speaker’s fees from charities and NGO’s, and refused to return them when it was revealed.

    He has admitted to breaking the law while an elected MP.(smoking cannabis).

    This has all been normalized by the Laurentian establishment, their media, and “social justice warriors”.Anyone else would have been cancelled or disqualified.

    We have (and have normalized) a racist and misogynist as prime minister of Canada.

    I was pretty clear that I really really don’t like Trudeau. SNC Lavellin clearly illustrates his unethical nature. I’ve never heard the boxing story. I have no idea about his tattoo. The other stories you mention show he’s an unethical creep. I’m sold. I still don’t think he’s a racist. IMO he’s way too woke for that.

  167. Harpers Hair says:

    The visionaries of the last 50 years.

    Bill Gates…dropped out of Harvard.

    Stephen Jobs…dropped out of junior college.

    Mark Zuckerberg…dropped out of Harvard in his sophomore year.

    Elon Musk….dropped out of Stanford after two days.

    Jeff Bezos…a degree in electrical engineering from Princeton…expect he didn’t do a lot of peer reviewed research before he launched Amazon.

    Transformative science doesn’t come from peer reviewed drones labouring away in their cubicles.

    It comes from visionaries who eschew conventional wisdom…just as it always has.

  168. Harpers Hair says:

    OriginalPouzar: Yup, I would still consider him a prospect.He is 23 (just 23) and could very well still establish himself as an middle 6 or bottom six NHLer.

    Its interesting that you don’t consider the 23 year old Gaudette as a prospect but yet, when this conversation started, you posted current stats of a 23 year old and a 26 year old in the AHL as evidence of the Canucks prospect superiority.

    Is that not direct and irrefutable evidence that you are changing your own parameters in order to meet your own chosen narrative?

    Come on HH, be honest in discussion, and with yourself.

    I did nothing of the sort.

    I answered one query about the Utica Comets because someone asked and I prefaced my remarks with that proviso.

    Stop making shit up.

  169. Pouzar says:

    godot10: The India trip was racist.

    In the Rolling Stones profile after the election in 2015, Trudeau said he intentionally targeted an indigenous person to beat up in a boxing match, and demanding a racist tribute as the stakes of the boxing match if he won.He then followed through and exacted his racist claim on the loser.

    He has tattooed himself with a colonizer’s tattoo.

    At a Liberal fundraiser in Toronto, in response to two indigenous persons who paid to attend to challenge him on his broken promises on Grassy Narrows, he sarcastically responded to them “Thank you for your donation”, and had them forciably removed.

    Trudeau had anonymous bullies defame Wilson Raybould in the media during the SNC-Lavalin scandal.Both the Toronto Star and Canadian Press have subsequently apologized from those pieces (but refuse to name Trudeau’s bullies).

    He has groped a women.Warren Kinsella, in his blog and in a published opinion piece in the Sun, says he was told by a senior Liberal that there are multiple affadavits regarding his behavior towards women. i.e. There is never just one cockroach.

    When Sophie was at home with two youn children during the Liberal leadership convention in 2012 (which Ignatieff won), he (then forty) hit on then college student Faith Goldy and her friends in a bar, and invited them to another.

    While an elected MP, Trudeau collected speaker’s fees from charities and NGO’s, and refused to return them when it was revealed.

    He has admitted to breaking the law while an elected MP.(smoking cannabis).

    This has all been normalized by the Laurentian establishment, their media, and “social justice warriors”.Anyone else would have been cancelled or disqualified.

    We have (and have normalized) a racist and misogynist as prime minister of Canada.

    *slow clap*
    *raises glass*

  170. Ryan says:

    Munny: There are dire issues with peer review.

    Bias:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1420798/

    Replication Crisis:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replication_crisis

    Edit:as JimmyV says there are dozens of articles on this serious issue.

    I would say that the systemic publication bias towards positive results along with post hoc data dredging are at the forefront of salient issues. With the rebranding of statistics as “data science” this issue will only get magnified.

  171. leadfarmer says:

    Harpers Hair,

    I don’t think you know what science is
    Getting rich out of building something out of established blocks does not mean you discovered those blocks
    For some reason you have quite the disdain for the scientific community
    “Drones”
    A lot of these people are very bright and innovative people

  172. Fuhr and Lowething. says:

    stephen sheps,

    Would you mind if I shared your piece publicly?

  173. godot10 says:

    JimmyV1965:
    People are people. We are often a product of our culture and the racial cues we grow up with.Many of the people who founded this country are consisted racist by today’s standards. The most superficial of our leaders want to hold them to account for that racism today, 200 years later. What they fail to realize is that standards will be muchdifferent 200 years from now, and the most woke person today might be considered a racist in the future. I find it sad that some people think it’s okay to cancel someone without truly knowing who they are. If Cherry is a racist, he should be held to account for that. I just hope we use more than his ramblings the other day to label him racist.

    One doesn’t have to wait 200 years to consider most woke people today as racist or misogynist. It is clear today.

    Intersectionality is inherently misogynist. It undermines real actual feminism. And once that is actually understood, wokeness will crumble as a massive fraud. Intersectionality denies biology, denies science, the uniqueness of two X chromosomes.

  174. leadfarmer says:

    leadfarmer,

    And not to take away from those people. Lot of them were absolutely brilliant minds that did great things
    Just like the guy that took McDonald’s from a small shop and spread it to every town in the world
    Brilliant mind ? Yes
    A scientist? No

  175. Harpers Hair says:

    leadfarmer:
    Harpers Hair,

    I don’t think you know what science is
    Getting rich out of building something out of established blocks does not mean you discovered those blocks
    For some reason you have quite the disdain for the scientific community
    “Drones”
    A lot of these people are very bright and innovative people

    I have a very clear understanding of what science is.

    Creating formative change out of blocks that the drones don’t know how to assemble is what genius looks like.

    You appear to believe that only drones who pick away at the margins and get published in obscure publications only read by other drones is somehow ingloriously noble.

    While these folks may occasionally develop something useful, thousand\s of them spend their careers navel gazing.

  176. stephen sheps says:

    Fuhr and Lowething.,

    Where did you plan to share it? I’m a bit leery about that, in part because of my family’s personal details and in part because of the fact that I am writing a post-script to a forthcoming book chapter on this very subject and kinda test drove part of my draft in that post.

    I think if you block out the names it’ll be ok, depending on where you decided to share it. Send me an email or twitter DM and we can sort that all out

    (stephensheps (at) gmail (dot) com)

  177. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Jesse is not a prospect any longer…he’s a failed draft pick.
    He’s proven it repeatedly in the NHL.

    Jack Hughes is a prospect just like his brother.

    While he started slowly he is New Jersey’s third leading scorer ahead of Nico Hischier, Pavel Zacha and Jesper Bratt.

    One would assume he would be less likely to be sent down than any of those players since he’s outproducing them.

    So once again we run up against subjectivity and your argument falls apart.

    In my opinion Puljujarvi is very much still a prospect – he is 21 years old and NHL teams are interested in acquiring him to give him an NHL shot. Yes, this is subjective and there are arguments.

    Jack Hughes is also a prospect as he hasn’t established himself as a full time NHL player – he very well could be re-assignment for development time.

    Quinn Hughes has established himself as an NHL player and a valuable one to his team. Sure, its subjective to say that he’s no longer a prospect but we both know that he is not leaving the national hockey league – we know this because we know hockey. To include him in a prospect ranking in order to rate it higher than a rival is dishonest.

    By your objective measure, one day he’ll be a prospect and the next day, when he plays a 25th game, no longer a prospect – some magical and arbitrary number.

    I’ll continue to go by my subjective analysis as opposed to some arbitrary number.

  178. OriginalPouzar says:

    rickithebear:
    19 gm in our team has given up 47 ga,
    Less 5 EN,
    42 reg phase = 2.21 GA/gm
    Less 2 Smith specials.
    40 reg phase GA = 2.11 GA/ gm

    Last yr
    271GA = 3.30 GA/gm
    Less 14 EN
    257 GA = 3.13 GA/gm

    Their is approx. 48 minutes of even play per game.

    Prefer dman evga be per 16.
    1/3 of Even game minutes.

    Oiler D:
    Manning 8 gm .18 evga/16
    Russel 19 gm .21 evga/16
    Benning 19 gm .26 evga/16
    —————————————-
    Klefbom 19gm .61 evga/16
    Persson 10gm .73 evga/16
    Nurse 19gm .77 evga/16
    Bear 19gm .77 evga/16

    Makes it clear as day that one of the bottom 4 needs to seed for Larsson.

    Do you believe that Manning and Russell are better and more valuable d-men than Klefbom and Bear?

  179. JimmyV1965 says:

    jp: Can you find anything that doesn’t have flaws sometimes?

    Any system that isn’t perfect can be completely discounted?

    I have no issue with the peer review process – as long as we recognize there are some flaws. It’s not perfect. I didn’t say it was useless. I was originally responding to a commenter critiquing Susan Crockford simply because she didn’t do field studies or peer reviewed research.

  180. OriginalPouzar says:

    rickithebear:
    Seth Jones:
    19/20
    .84 evga/16
    .35 evp/16 #309 skater
    That is not good goal diff math per 1/3 of gm even minutes.

    Pass!

    Seth Jones – at his age and with his contract may be the most valuable player (vis-a-vis his contract and performance) in the NHL.

  181. Pescador says:

    Pouzar: *slow clap*
    *raises glass*

    *empties glass into gullet*
    *fills glass up again*

  182. defmn says:

    Munny: There are dire issues with peer review.

    Bias:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1420798/

    Replication Crisis:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replication_crisis

    Edit:as JimmyV says there are dozens of artiles on this serious issue.

    Humans going to human, eh?

    The social sciences & humanities are in disarray these days imo.

    There are a lot of considerations that go into how we got here but I would propose that a misreading of the original doctrine outlining the parameters of the scientific method in Francis Bacon’s New Organon explains more than most contemporary social scientists understand.

    There is a disconnect between Aristotelian teleological & Baconian/Cartesian utilitarian science that deliberately obfuscates the distinction between what we today call the social sciences and the physical sciences that Bacon was primarily focused on advancing.

    But then my reading of the tradition clearly indicates the emergence of all of the social sciences during the 19th century are compromised by confusing Hobbes rhetoric with his philosophic metaphysics.

    If this makes any sense. 😉

    Or

    Yeah, there is a lot of politics in the social sciences; especially these days. 😉

  183. OriginalPouzar says:

    HarpersHair: Upon the news of Don Cheery’s firing…Fabricland has declared bankruptcy.

    Too soon?

    Now we are plagiarizing jokes

  184. godot10 says:

    Unfriendly Regional Arachnid Individual: I’m pretty sure almost everybody WANTS to make the world a better place.

    This is almost certainly not true for the people who make the decisions, the powers-that-be, the existing Deep States, or wealth inequality would not be going exponential.

    The powers-that-be are neofeudalists. They want to make the world a worse place for most of the people.

  185. Pescador says:

    OriginalPouzar,

    Just read your review of Samorukov, Bouchard, Yammer in yesterday’s thread.
    Excellent stuff, thx O.P

  186. knighttown says:

    godot10:

    We have (and have normalized) a racist and misogynist as prime minister of Canada.

    I always find this “speech” so interesting because of all the things JT is, a racist and a misogynist are the most unlikely. It’s like calling McDavid a poor skater. His record in promoting equality in his government and elsewhere is excellent and in fact one of the most common criticisms is that he’s too “woke” and he’s even accused of tokenism; giving visible minorities and women positions that aren’t warranted.

    As someone eloquently stated earlier, if you want a reason to vote out Trudeau you’ve got one withSNC which was absolutely abhorrent.

    So why go to this Sun media drivel?

    But let’s give you the benefit of the doubt and assume racism and misogyny and LGBTQ rights is your one and only election issue. You sir, are a one-issue voter. In this case I can absolutely see voting out Trudeau because he doesn’t meet your expectations as a leader in this crucial-to-you topic. So by that logic I’d have to assume you voted Jagmeet and the NDPs who would have the strongest record on social justice and equality. If that’s you, I applaud your stance with full honesty.

    But I have a sneaking suspicion you voted for the party of old white guys and this is all a smokescreen.

  187. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair:
    The visionaries of the last 50 years.

    Bill Gates…dropped out of Harvard.

    Stephen Jobs…dropped out of junior college.

    Mark Zuckerberg…dropped out of Harvard in his sophomore year.

    Elon Musk….dropped out of Stanford after two days.

    Jeff Bezos…a degree in electrical engineering from Princeton…expect he didn’t do a lotof peer reviewed research before he launched Amazon.

    Transformative science doesn’t come from peer reviewed drones labouring away in their cubicles.

    It comes from visionaries who eschew conventional wisdom…just as it always has.

    All of these guys are great entrepreneurs. Nobody is arguing that you can’t achieve business success without advanced education. The science behind their respective business models is conducted by people with advanced education. An aside, several of your visionaries ripped off other people’ ideas (so who is the true visionary?).

  188. godot10 says:

    leadfarmer: But Canada’s population is really centered around its 10 largest population centers.So to give you the “equality” you want you would have to make people’s vote in those centers worth less than 1 vote
    Which is one of the problems in US is one person does not equal one vote because depending on where you live your votes value is different

    Atlantic Canada has as many seats as Alberta and half the population. The 40 seat lead the Liberals have would only be 20 if that were not true. It gave Trudeau the majority in 2015, whereas it would have only been a minority if there was not this embedded extreme violation of population per riding in Atlantic Canada.

  189. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: All of these guys are great entrepreneurs.Nobody is arguing that you can’t achieve business success without advanced education.The science behind their respective business models is conducted by people with advanced education.An aside, several of your visionaries ripped off other people’ ideas (so who is the true visionary?).

    Please name all the other people whose ideas they “ripped off” and then we’ll talk.

  190. Victoria Oil says:

    leadfarmer: It’s too funny that two guys that have never done any research or published a peer review paper are experts on the process.
    First of all the scientific process has changed quite a bit since bloodletting.From absolutely none
    To a closely vetted process even before you get funded because the dollars are so short
    Secondly you get caught fudging data you are discredited for life.You DONT WANT that.You will not get hired or find funding.
    Yes A lot of research has next to little impact on the average persons life but once in a while someone discovers something significant
    Yes sometimes the accepted conclusion gets changed over time as something new gets discovered but you need to publishso it can be critiqued and your experiment can be reproduced and confirmed by an independent scientist.
    So for example in a 100 years I’m sure they will look back on our current cancer treatments and think we did nothing but inject poison into people which sometimes helped but you know what it was vetted by many experts and through scientific process determined to be the be
    st treatment
    Not a freaking blog

    I am not an academic, but I will give my two cents on peer reviewed papers. I have written about 8-10 articles/papers for various industry journals over the years. The non-peer reviewed pieces I wrote took 3-30 hours to write. The one peer reviewed paper took about 150 hours to complete and address all the questions and concerns that I had to deal with. So yes, it does make a difference.

  191. Mr DeBakey says:

    Harpers Hair:
    The visionaries of the last 50 years.

    Bill Gates…dropped out of Harvard.

    Stephen Jobs…dropped out of junior college.

    Mark Zuckerberg…dropped out of Harvard in his sophomore year.

    Elon Musk….dropped out of Stanford after two days.

    Jeff Bezos…a degree in electrical engineering from Princeton…expect he didn’t do a lotof peer reviewed research before he launched Amazon.

    Transformative science doesn’t come from peer reviewed drones labouring away in their cubicles.

    It comes from visionaries who eschew conventional wisdom…just as it always has.

    The Myth of Selfmade Men:

    Harley Davidson – rich uncle lent them startup money
    Bezos – parents lent him $250k seed money
    Bill Gates – Grandpa was CEO of a bank, Dad was partner at a law firm
    Elon Musk – Dad owned an emerald mine in Africa

    https://twitter.com/pitchforkcosmo/status/1187015991458439169

  192. McSorley33 says:

    Halfwise:
    Great thread today.

    I learned more today about what Scott Adams calls the ‘other half of the movie audience’. His memorable interpretation is that we all sit in the same theatre but are watching different movies.

    Trump, racism, world wars, climate change, polar bears, Trudeau, multiculturalism, poppies, Larsson, whatever. The way some other people interpret things is as surprising to me as my views would be to them.

    I’m glad we are free. Thank you, vets, for your service.

    Agreed.

    It was like a Republican ( adamant anti-Trumper) said about the reaction to the election
    of Trump. Like watching a large segment of the population take a Rosearch test.

    Trump hadn’t moved into the Whitehouse yet.

  193. godot10 says:

    Woodguy v2.0: I don’t think extending Larsson is a good idea.

    I like him playing out his contract next year though.

    Depends what he will sign for and the duration, and on his performance this year and next (i.e. whether last year was an aberration).

  194. Harpers Hair says:

    Mr DeBakey: The Myth of Selfmade Men:

    Harley Davidson – rich uncle lent them startup money
    Bezos – parents lent him $250k seed money
    Bill Gates – Grandpa was CEO of a bank, Dad was partner at a law firm
    Elon Musk – Dad owned an emerald mine in Africa

    https://twitter.com/pitchforkcosmo/status/1187015991458439169

    Donald Trump.

    It’s not what you start with, it’s how you finish.

    J. Robert Oppenheimer was a classically educated physicist who, while a chain smoker, avowed Communist and noted philanderer only published 5 papers in his life and had short shrift for academic life.

    He came into his own after he read the Bhagavad Gita in the original Sanskrit, and later he cited it as one of the books that most shaped his philosophy of life.

    “I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”

    I doubt he had that peer reviewed.

  195. Material Elvis says:

    Harpers Hair: Please name all the other people whose ideas they “ripped off” and then we’ll talk.

    Zuckerberg stole the Winklevoss twins idea.
    Steve Wozniak invented the Apple computer.
    Don Estridge is the father of the first IBM personal computer.
    Jeff Bezos expanded on online retailing.
    Elon Musk certainly didn’t invent the electric car and he wasn’t even the first to introduce a modern electric car — Toyota released a Prius Hybrid in 1997. His SpaceX stuff is interesting.

  196. Material Elvis says:

    This MNF game is pretty crazy.

  197. godot10 says:

    AussieOil:
    Hi Lowetide Community, long time lurker, who comments rarely. But a question for those who have followed the team on the Road. My partner and I are going to games in SJ, LA and LV (woo hoo!), and was wondering any tips on road games. In particular was wondering if it is possible to watch the team practice?

    Lowetide thanks for the Blog, part of my morning routine to get a coffee and read the blog and comments!

    In Edmonton, for practices, one has to be a guest or invited by one of the teams. Do you know someone who can “put you on the list”?

    Write to the Oilers and ask? Write to the local team and ask?

  198. Harpers Hair says:

    Well…it has indeed been an epic thread and we must thank our host for his generous space and tolerance.

    I am happy to report that the leftover pork belly was stir fried with some Korean BBQ sauce and served on an Asian salad.

    I’ve finished up a wee dram of Oban and now headed to bed with fond thoughts of OP holding onto his dream of Jesse as a prospect and his desire to rewrite what “prospect” actually means.

    Also have to mention that Stephen Sheps is an actual class act that I would like to see more of and that I hope I haven’t offended any “scientists” who think there is only one way to skin a cat.

    Adios.

  199. Harpers Hair says:

    Material Elvis: Zuckerberg stole the Winklevoss twins idea.
    Steve Wozniak invented the Apple computer.
    Don Estridge is the father of the first IBM personal computer.
    Jeff Bezos expanded on online retailing.
    Elon Musk certainly didn’t invent the electric car and he wasn’t even the first to introduce a modern electric car — Toyota released a Prius Hybrid in 1997.His SpaceX stuff is interesting.

    And yet…none of those drones changed a thing…go figure.

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